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In light of the squeeze in hard drive prices ...

Displaying poll results.
I've ordered a new HDD before all prices rise
  862 votes / 5%
I've ordered 2+ HDDs before all prices rise
  964 votes / 5%
I've decided to switch to SSD
  2556 votes / 15%
I've decided to make do with current HDDs
  11269 votes / 66%
Something else, explained below
  1263 votes / 7%
16914 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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In light of the squeeze in hard drive prices ...

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  • I bought a couple of 2TB drives earlier this year when I decided to rip my entire DVD collection for streaming - one drive for the videos, one to serve as backup. I doubt I'd have bought any more for a while, even if prices were going to be stable.

    • I had four 3TB drives priced at about $130 each in my cart at Newegg last Thursday and was narrowing down selection of the actual NAS in which to install them. I figured I'd make up my mind over the weekend and order it on Monday. I picked out the NAS, but when I went back to order the drives, the price had jumped to $210, limit one per customer. I had a budget of about $1000 for the NAS, but I'm now out of options until either Black Friday/Cyber Monday or whatever the date is that Western Digital brings

      • by danomac (1032160)

        Did you know about the impending doom/shortage before delaying your decision?

        I can't see someone doing that intentionally when there's a known shortage of drives coming.

        • I was peripherally aware of the news of the floods and that it would impact drive production, but didn't know the full extent of the damage at the time. Even factoring that in, a price jump of that magnitude over a weekend isn't something one would normally expect.

          I'm pondering whether to delay the NAS project until January (it's not terribly necessary) or to go with lesser drives at $160 each. I'll probably wait, though.

          • by danomac (1032160)

            Still, finding news like that out must've been a shock. My supplier actually informed me Friday that prices were increasing rapidly already. I wonder if SSDs are impacted by the facilities - probably not, but the demand for them will rise and so will the prices. SSDs are okay for an OS drive, but any large storage requirements are going to be spinning drives.

            I think I saw a 1 TB SSD for $2000. Ouch.

    • If I may ask, what is the point of having everything networked so you can stream videos? I don't really see the advantage over what I do (which is 1) rip/download 2) burn to DVD in .avi format 3) erase the file off the server. ) My way I have a clean, simple DVD catalogue to flip though, where if I have everything on the network I have to navigate through file systems, looking all over hell's half acre for a movie I might have. The other issue is the system overhead - the server is always on, plus an HTPC o
      • by vlm (69642)

        The other issue is the system overhead - the server is always on, plus an HTPC on every TV I could want to stream to. As well, the network infrastructure has to be able to handle the possibility of multiple streams, so the router has to kick ass. This is against the $60 stand-alone player I picked up at Walmart which handles the vast majority of formats. To me, there seems to be very little upside to networking for this.

        Having lived thru this for about a decade, its gone from experimental cutting edge $1000 per box 250 watt full size PC hardware with roaring fans in the early 00s to 5 watt $300 hardware accelerated playback where even the lowest end consumer gear is far in excess of whats necessary. I think you'd be surprised at how little it takes with 2011 hardware instead of 2002 hardware.

        The server is always on anyway, the "htpc" like my old zotec zbox draws a bit more than a clock radio but not much.

      • by jedidiah (1196)

        What's so complicated? Do you get lost in the local mall too? it's really not that hard to sort out 500 or even 2000 DVDs.

        Organization is pretty obvious. It's the same method used by Blockbuster, Virgin Megastore, or even iTunes. You can even employ some sort of search tool if you like. Or you could just view all of your DVD covers in one big pile MCE/Kaledescape style.

        "Smart playlists" are also an interesting option.

        Unless you are using a samba share and a DOS prompt, the options aren't quite as dire as yo

      • by jedidiah (1196)

        > his is against the $60 stand-alone player I picked up at Walmart ...which probably has the gruesome sort of interface that makes dealing with a large media collection more trouble than it needs to be.

        "the vast majority of formats" is probably in truth not much really.

        Consider the likelihood that people willing to "waste money on expensive options" probably have direct experience with any "cheaper option" you care to name.

      • by Splab (574204)

        I used to do what you do. I have a NAS and a HTPC; no more scratched DVDs to worry about, no more battling with the DVD drive; all files are put in simple folders and ready to rock and roll within seconds.

        If I know I have a movie, locating it on the harddrive is a matter of opening "movies" catalog and find it by alphabetical order. Locating it on my DVD rack can take ages, since they are never in order and some have been lent out and never returned - and even when you manage to figure out where you put it,

      • by geekoid (135745)

        wha? it's just a list of files. How hard is that to organize?

        Personally, I;m still looking for a good tool that lets me copy the DVD as a whole, and then allow me to turn dubbing and/or subtitles. Avi doesn't work for that.

        • DVD Decrypter lets you take a copy of the whole disc, but only as an .iso (some players can play ISOs as if they were self contained DVD files, some you need to actually mount, though VLC plays ISOs), naturally there is no compression so you need a couple gigs for each.
          • Actually DVD Decrypter will also do the "main movie" on the free version and that give you a Video_TS folder. Personally I use Handbrake on Linux. Once DeCSS is installed you rip the DVD with Handbrake. I use MKV and run it as 900Kabr (2-pass encode) for the video and direct copy of the AC3. I then have access to my entire collection from my WD Live TV+ connected to the HD TV in the living room and the optical SPDIF the the Yamaha receiver. All the joy of DVD in about ¼ the space and can on a rain
        • I use dvdbackup [sourceforge.net]. It creates a VIDEO_TS directory mimicking the structure of the original DVD, but with the copy protection removed. Players like VLC will happily open it and it behaves exactly like the original DVD. With hard drive space as cheap as it is, there isn't a great deal of point in transcoding unless you want to play back on some mobile device (and many of these can run VLC or similar now and play back ripped DVDs directly). I think my entire DVD collection is probably only about 1TB, which s
      • If I may ask, what is the point of having everything networked so you can stream videos? I don't really see the advantage over what I do (which is 1) rip/download 2) burn to DVD in .avi format 3) erase the file off the server. ) My way I have a clean, simple DVD catalogue to flip though, where if I have everything on the network I have to navigate through file systems, looking all over hell's half acre for a movie I might have.

        I don't understand the "have to navigate through file systems" comment. I'm using a Tivo, but it could just as well be a DLNA-aware TV or other device. There are free programs (I'm using streambaby) that will take whatever media files you've put in an arbitrary directory (or group of directories) and make them available from a menu on your TV. No searching through folders, it's just a matter of looking through an alphabetically-organized list of movies and TV shows.

        Of course the way you choose to do it and

      • by Lumpy (12016)

        "If I may ask, what is the point of having everything networked so you can stream videos?"

        Many people have more than 1 TV. I have a living room tv, a bedroom tv and the game room tv and finally the theater that has a 102" screen. instead of causing problems and having to copy movies to 4 places I put them on a NAS. works great. and with XBMC, If I stop a movie in the theater, I can go to the bedroom and resume it where I left off as it remembers where I left off. but then I built a media server not a

      • 1) rip/download 2) burn to DVD in .avi format 3) erase the file off the server.

        4) end up with ~235 DVDs for just 1TB.

        When I recorded 200 DVDs, I realized that they take too much space and effort (recording, labeling, cataloging every disc) and switched to tapes. The basic procedure is the same, but as one tape holds 100GB (200GB after upgrade), I need to do it less often (instead of swapping ~40 discs every 10 minutes, I just start the process and can do something else while the file server writes and verifies the tape in ~4 hours), and hopefully tapes will last longer than DVDs, as 6

  • by khr (708262) <kevinrubin@gmail.com> on Wednesday October 26, 2011 @12:24PM (#37846212) Homepage

    I've dug through my old floppies for a program a former employer of mine, PC-Kwik, made, but never released that allows swapping an almost unlimited number of floppies in and out in place of more hard drive space... That should hold off the hard drive crunch, for me, for at least an hour or two...

    • by hjf (703092)

      That should hold off the hard drive crunch, for me, for at least an hour or two...

      An hour or two? What are you on? Dialup?

    • by rcpitt (711863)

      I've dug through my old floppies for a program a former employer of mine, PC-Kwik, made, but never released that allows swapping an almost unlimited number of floppies in and out in place of more hard drive space... That should hold off the hard drive crunch, for me, for at least an hour or two...

      damn - and I just threw out a whole case of floppies - still have some 8" though - do you need some?

  • by vlm (69642)

    I've already switched to SSDs for everything but "big bulk network accessible media storage".

    They're just too cheap, for the sizes I need. My mythtv frontends only use two or three gigs, my desktops only use a couple gigs. Gaming PC needs a large rotating media, but thats about it, and by the time it fries, SSDs will be big enough and cheap enough for that too.

    • Re:SSDs (Score:4, Interesting)

      by DigiShaman (671371) on Wednesday October 26, 2011 @12:52PM (#37846544) Homepage

      Apple doesn't enable TRIM on any SSD drive unless the firmware is branded as "Apple". This applies to both Snow Leopard and Lion. Crippled intentionally. My guess is that Apple wants to control the hardware so much, they don't want to be responsible for data loss because of buggy or untested SSD firmware normally conducted in their lab for QC. It could also be because they want their drives to perform the best and hence up-sell you on their over-priced hardware. Good news however, there are commands you can run in the terminal to edit a file. It basically removes this "Apple" specific check.

      • by keeboo (724305)
        Macs have been like this since before OS X.
        I remember that, during the beige era, there was SCSI HDs which were simply rejected by the OS (you could not use those at all, AFAIR the OS reported those as "unsupported"), and the fix was to run a 3rd-party software which enabled those.
  • I was going to vote "decided to make do" but then I realized I didn't make any decision at all as a result of the HDD pricing news since I have 4TB of drive space and no desire to expand any time soon.

    • I didn't make any decision based on the news either. I've recently fitted a cheap SSD to my laptop, but it was completely unrelated to this. The difference in performance, even using a relatively cheap V+100 made it worth losing the extra storage space.
  • by Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) on Wednesday October 26, 2011 @12:46PM (#37846494)
    Tried to order some replacement 15,000RPM SAS drives, and I simply can not get them. The problem is the server is down without new drives and I have no other options.
    I wonder if I could throw a couple of SATA SSD drives in there instead.
    • yes IIRC you can do this, however throughput wll be 1/2 of the SAS speed and overall transfer rate will suck as well, but it should keep you up and running. Or you could buy SAS SSDs, not cheap, but should give you all the performance you want.

      • by BitZtream (692029)

        ...

        WTF are you smoking? Almost ANY SSD will smoke pretty much EVERY spinning disk of the same form factor. You really have to get a shitty SSD for that not to be the case.

        Either way, at now point is the SATA or SAS channel the bottleneck. The fact that you think it is shows you really have no idea how these systems work.

        • by Vancorps (746090)

          Or you don't know RAID controllers of which many are SAS 6G/SATA 3G. So when it detects a SATA SSD even if it supports SATA 6G you run at half speed.

        • by geekoid (135745)

          SAS drives are all about platters. A large one will smoke SSDs. There are a lot of reasons for this, and if you don't know them, look them up.

          For Home use, yes SSDs are the way to go, but when you have 50TB? no.

  • Make it someone else's problem. After all, that's the whole point of the cloud, right?

  • by Bodhammer (559311) on Wednesday October 26, 2011 @01:33PM (#37847024)
    I don't need hard drives, I've developed a pornographic memory!
    • by j741 (788258)

      I don't need hard drives, I've developed a pornographic memory!

      Yes, because we know that's all hard drives are used to store these days anyway. A hard drive crunch just means a little less porn storage space. Time to fall-back to the old-school: magazines under the bed.

      • by Abstrackt (609015) *

        I don't need hard drives, I've developed a pornographic memory!

        Yes, because we know that's all hard drives are used to store these days anyway. A hard drive crunch just means a little less porn storage space. Time to fall-back to the old-school: magazines under the bed.

        I say meet in the middle and store DVDs under the bed. Not only do they take up less space physically but you can fit scans of every magazine you'd ever care to read on one.

  • In light of all the 2-4Tbyte drives that have been coming out, I've moved much of our video off the 200-500 Gig drives and now have a pile of them - seems I might have to start re-using them
  • I've not changed my behaviour at all, and not decided anything.

    • by treeves (963993)

      Same here. Haven't given it much thought. I've thought about buying one of those portable USB HDs, say 1TB, but it's not high on my list of priorities.

    • by maglor_83 (856254)

      Indeed. This is the first I've heard of a price squeeze.

    • by kent_eh (543303)
      My something else is: bought enough drives to triple my storage capacity before I was aware of an impending shortage.
      Have no plans to make changes because of the (rumors of an) impending shortage.

      Steady as she goes, Mr Sulu
    • by dkleinsc (563838)

      I'd notice that the poll question "In light of the squeeze in hard drive prices ..." certainly reads to me like "oh noes, hard drives are getting expensive, you should buy one right now", which is not the correct conclusion.

      Especially since I've not come close to running out of space - what I do with my personal machines (software development, writing, communication with the outside world, and a little bit of gaming) doesn't involve huge quantities of data.

  • decided to store my p0rn on the interwebs.
  • I'll just use a million monkeys and give them hammers and chisels to carve my data onto granite slabs.

  • by llZENll (545605)

    - I have no need for more drives in the immediate future.
    - I accept the price rise and will buy drives as needed.

  • Eh? They've already soared - 1TB hard disks were about £50, they're more like £100 now.

  • what's the big deal, Hard Drives are dirt cheap, even with the potential 50% price rise they will still be so cheap as to be irrelevant when it comes to deciding what storage to put in my machines and when to buy it.
    • by jedidiah (1196)

      I will do nothing.

      Or rather I will replace drives as they need to be replaced on the schedule I have already determined without considering this distortion in prices.

      Fortunately, I just bought replacements for my most "needy" drives. They were due.

    • by vlm (69642)

      what's the big deal, Hard Drives are dirt cheap, even with the potential 50% price rise they will still be so cheap as to be irrelevant when it comes to deciding what storage to put in my machines and when to buy it.

      A respectable rule of thumb is the electricity to run an old fashioned rotating drive 24x365 for five years (a long lifetime) costs about $100. So if the capital cost of the drive goes from $50 to $100, don't panic that the total cost of ownership has doubled, its only gone from $150 to $200 or "about a third more"

      Another respectable rule of thumb is at current prices, the cost of the rest of the infrastructure for the bare drives swamps the cost of the drives until you get over 10 TB or so. Below 10 TB d

  • Now I won't need one for another 3 years.

  • The company a friend works for just dumped a bunch of 1 TB 5400 RPM drives. He gave me six of them. I'm set. (Now if only my server machine that has a six drive bay wasn't such a power hog and so insanely noisy...)

  • by PPH (736903) on Wednesday October 26, 2011 @06:08PM (#37850062)

    ... drive.

    I guess I'll have to cut back on downloading pr0n.

  • Switched to that a few years ago so why do i care about a 'hard drive' with all those pesky moving parts ( and such a low storage ability )?

    And no, you cant have one yet, its research material that is still highly classified on how it works.

  • I've been on the fence about putting a terabyte drive in my laptop, the impending price rise pushed me over the edge. Now I'll finally have room for the 496 Gigabytes of photos I've taken since 1997... this should hold me for about a year or up to the time I get a new d-SLR with video capability.

    So far I've managed to load the photos up through mid-2001.... and it's only going to get slower from here on as the cameras got better and higher resolution.

  • I am hoarding the stack of HDDs we recently replaced with SSDs, to sell when supply starts to dry up.

  • I ordered a new hard drive because I needed more space. Potential price increases had nothing to do with it.

  • I have a 1 year old 2TB drive, a 1TB drive, and two 500GB drives, all SATA. I also have a 750GB external drive. The external isn't as handy as it used to be, only for the fact that my current case has a SATA dock built into the top, and my system supports hot-swapping of hard drives. Unless I need to be sure I can access files on another machine, I can just plug in one of the spare drives as needed.

  • What squeeze? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by HTMLSpinnr (531389) on Wednesday October 26, 2011 @11:47PM (#37852340) Homepage

    Where's the option for those who are ignorant of the "problem"?

    • This - I buy disks when I need them, not when there's a price rise. I bought 6 hard drives recently, perhaps before that rise, maybe after the squeeze, and I'm going to buy more soon. What does the price rise have anything to do with my needs?

    • Re:What squeeze? (Score:4, Informative)

      by bakuun (976228) on Thursday October 27, 2011 @05:42AM (#37853694)
      The floodings in Thailand have hit both harddrive manufacturers directly (Western Digital, Hitachi), and component suppliers hard. They think it will take months until things have normalized again. As a result, hard drive prices have gone up quite a lot lately.
  • I was planing on upgrading my two internal HDs, which total in capacity at ~300GB.

    Was going to buy a 30GB SSD and a 2TB HD. But I can wait this out. It was more of a convenience for me, so I don't have to push things out to the NAS quite so often.

    Maybe drive storage isn't fungible?

  • I'm probably the exception rather than the rule here... but why the hell would I need new hard drives? At some point one may fail, but I assure you I'm not about to run out and stockpile them in case it does. Most of my work and play these days is taking place on my iPad anyways.

    I have at least 250GB of (personally owned) cloud storage, and 500GB in my laptop with an additional 500GB for backup. I'm probably using half of that.

    Now that I'm thinking about it, the only real data hogs I have are the virtual ma

  • I have 10 terabytes of storage. 90% full. (that's 6x2T hdd, where 2 marketing T != 2 real T)

    I have enough work sorting that much data out for now, I'll up it when the next paradigm comes along.

  • I saw this poll earlier this week and thought I would stay with what I have (I have a NAS with 1.5/2TB still empty). But today I realised I also have another 2TB just sitting on drives in my machine that are not backed up anywhere. A dangerous place to be. So I picked up a 2.5TB external and an esata caddie to back up on.
  • Paper Tape is making a comeback!

  • But I always said 8 tracks would make a comeback.

We can defeat gravity. The problem is the paperwork involved.

 



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