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Regarding timezones: I would rather live ...

Displaying poll results.
A timezone or two to the east
  923 votes / 4%
More than two timezones to the east
  921 votes / 4%
A timezone or two to the west
  1909 votes / 9%
More than two timezones to the west
  1346 votes / 6%
My current timezone is where it's at.
  14375 votes / 68%
I'll explain my complicated answer below.
  1630 votes / 7%
21104 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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Regarding timezones: I would rather live ...

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  • by MadKeithV (102058) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @03:28AM (#37324162)
    I want to live several timezones to the south!

    Oh,
    wait.
    • I want to live several timezones to the south!

      Oh,
      wait.

      My sentiments entirely. A few hours flight south would be nice, especially during the winter months.
      We're much too close to the arctic circle for comfort (we're about 62.5N).

      • Sitka, Alaska, to be exact.

        I hope to make it back there soon.
        • by Z00L00K (682162)

          Bodö, Norway, Kiruna, Sweden are both at 62.5N and both are way south of Kirkenes, Norway at 69.73N,30.03E, and even more south from Nordkapp, Norway at 71.12N,25.78E.

          But if you want to go really north; Svalbard at 78.60N,16.03E - It's so very North that you have lower taxes if you select to work there.

          And Sitka, Alaska; 57.05N,135.55W - that's still way south of my location at 57.65N,12.02E and I'm in the Southern part of Sweden.

          And I have been living in Kiruna, Sweden and found that it's cold as fsck

          • by Gorshkov (932507)
            Alert, NWT for the win (82.30N, 62.20W) - I had two tours there while in the military. Enough so that I now consider Labrador, where I grew up, as being in the south (Only 52.90N)
            • by c0lo (1497653)

              Alert, NWT for the win (82.30N, 62.20W) - I had two tours there while in the military. Enough so that I now consider Labrador, where I grew up, as being in the south (Only 52.90N)

              Well, would farther south be better? Like here [wikipedia.org]?

            • by cbiltcliffe (186293) on Thursday September 08, 2011 @08:12AM (#37338484) Homepage Journal

              Kids these days.

              When I was a lad, there were 75 of us living in a cardboard box 100 miles north of the north pole. We used to have to get up before the sun came up, which was harder in summer than winter, and lick the glaciers for water.

              But you try to tell that to young people today, and they'll never believe you.....

      • by Tsingi (870990)
        That is up there quite a bit. But if you're patient few years, and live high enough above sea level, it will become more tropical.

        30 years ago I made jokes about Club Frobisher. Frobisher Bay is in the Canadian arctic.

      • by TWX (665546)

        We have no Daylight Savings Time here, and I see no reason for DST's existence. Things work out just fine here.

        I always liked the quote about cutting the end off of a blanket, sewing it to the other end of the blanket, and claiming to have improved it.

      • Re:None of the above (Score:4, Interesting)

        by MaXintosh (159753) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @11:57AM (#37328186)
        Fun fact: Most of Alaska should be one or two timezones behind where they are. The state is UCT -9. Geographically, every non-SE part should be UCT -10, -11 or ±12. But since time is so screwed up in the state's non SE-bits (Either endless light or pretty much none, with rapid changes between the two), UCT -9 works in a pinch. Of course that fact underlines how useless DST is in the north.

        Okay, I lied. That fact wasn't even slightly fun.
      • by Kittenman (971447)

        I want to live several timezones to the south! Oh, wait.

        My sentiments entirely. A few hours flight south would be nice, especially during the winter months. We're much too close to the arctic circle for comfort (we're about 62.5N).

        I live in the Southern hemisphere, you insensitive clod!

      • by Rei (128717)

        I wish I lived around 64N. Anyone here have any laus störf for programmers around that latitude? ;)

    • That would be traveling back in time... You can go back in time to life as it was 50 years ago - just travel down south.

  • by anti-pop-frustration (814358) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @03:47AM (#37324238) Journal
    Or have slashdot polls really being going downhill lately? Both unfunny *and* uninteresting? Several times in row?
    • by Thnurg (457568)

      Are you missing Cowboy Neal? I am.

    • Really? I found something interesting :D

      Even though most slashdotters are happy with their timezones, more people favor the west over the east. A possible reason: slashdotters commonly stay up late and some of them want a reasonable routine. To do so, they only have to move westwards a few hours. Convoluted, yeah, but plausible. ;)

      • by mcmonkey (96054)

        Really? I found something interesting :D

        Even though most slashdotters are happy with their timezones, more people favor the west over the east. A possible reason: slashdotters commonly stay up late and some of them want a reasonable routine. To do so, they only have to move westwards a few hours. Convoluted, yeah, but plausible. ;)

        Another possible reason: some people will click on anything. The first four options make no sense. East of what? West of what? Those options do not mean anything. And yet almost a quarter of the voters pick one of those options.

        • by AuMatar (183847)

          East of where you live. Which is why I picked it- living in EST would make playing with stocks easier.

  • There really is no reason to move from Norway - just saying...
  • Always west (Score:4, Insightful)

    by funkatron (912521) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @04:43AM (#37324440)
    I seem to live about 2 timezones west of where I am and I don't think moving would help. Mornings are just something I can't do.
    • Slow Down The Earth (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Dr. Hok (702268) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @05:45AM (#37324724)

      I seem to live about 2 timezones west of where I am and I don't think moving would help. Mornings are just something I can't do.

      I wish our earth would rotate slower. My personal day length is somewhere around 26 hours. I have experimentally verified it during long holidays (when I studied physics I used to have 3 months of summer holidays with enough funding and nothing to do), where my perceived day would rotate roughly one cycle in a fortnight.

      When I talked to others I found that this is more os less the same for a lot of people. I wonder why we haven't managed to adapt to a 24 hour cycle. Or maybe we did adapt, but our no-longer-hunter-and-collector lifestyle makes us un-adapt.

      • by beerbear (1289124)
        Sure it's not due to artificial light? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circadian_rhythm#Humans [wikipedia.org]
      • by Roger W Moore (538166) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @01:07PM (#37329282) Journal

        I wish our earth would rotate slower. My personal day length is somewhere around 26 hours.

        Don't worry - you are probably just a few million years ahead of the rest of us. Thanks to tidal friction from the moon the earth's rotation is slowing. Days used to be several hours shorter and, in the future will be longer. The rate of increase of a solar day is currently about +1.70 ± 0.05 ms/century [wikipedia.org] which is slightly less than the +2.3ms/cy because the polar caps are still rebounding from the last ice age, shrinking the earth's equator and causing the Earth to spin a little faster due to conservation of angular momentum (the same way that ice skaters use to increase their spin rate by pulling in their arms and legs).

        Assuming we maintain an average 2.3 ms/cy (the crust rebound time is only on the order of a few thousand years) in about 313 million years the earth will have a 26 hour day. So hang around for a bit and your problem will be solved!

    • First off, this is yet another goofy poll that can be interpreted a number of different ways. That being said, I' thinking we need to be moved about two (or more) timezones *EAST*. That way when we crawl out of bed at a civilized hour (8:00 am or later) we're synchronized with those gawd-awful morning people we have to deal with who get up before sunrise and expect us to do the same.

      Just remember: the early worm deserves the bird.

      Cheers,
      Dave

      • Yes. The insane early morning people should move more west, and the late wakers should move more east. Create the full spectrum so that everyone wakes up at roughly the same time completely naturally. I realize that means some people are waking up in the middle of the night. Actually... I would be over in the area of waking up in the middle of the night, because I seem to sleep best in the middle of the day (or perhaps that's just because of the timezone I'm in...). Too bad I have to be awake and at work at

    • I'm at 3 or 4 with an infant who doesn't sleep through the night. Today I started at 11am.
    • by oldhack (1037484)
      I, too, wish we have 30-hour day, rather than 24-hour day.
  • by zebadee (551743) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @04:53AM (#37324482) Homepage
    ....there aren't many options to the east (in the same day anyway).
  • The time zone i live in (Northern Territory, Australia) is half an hour different from the next time zone to the east (and 1.5 hours from the next zone to the west), which is just plain silly. Either make it an hour different - which would bring it closer to local time in the territory capital, Darwin - or don't bother with a difference at all.

    • It gets worse : Nepal has a UTC+05:45 timezone. WTF?

      • Saudi Arabia even tried going by "Riyadh Solar Time" for a few years. This had 00:00 defined as sunset in Riyadh. I suspect they used standard seconds & hours (giving days which might differ from 24 hours), rather than using variable length seconds. Luckily, they abandoned such a perverted and imprecise scheme around 1990. Timetables for ships, airplanes, trains, etc. must have been a bit sloppy.
      • by _merlin (160982)

        Nepal has a UTC+05:45 timezone. WTF?

        It's because they couldn't possibly allow the country to run on UTC+05:30 because that would be the same as India, but they still want to maximise overlap of business hours with India for practicality, and have the day roughly aligned with the sun. Politics as usual.

      • by PhilHibbs (4537)

        There's a thin coastal strip in Australia that is a quarter hour out as well, but it is an informal time zone.

    • The 3 people who live near the WA/SA border use their own timezone of 45 minutes behind you you guys. Confused the heck out of me as I was driving through, thought I must have been breaking the sound barrier for the last hundred miles.

  • I really don't care. How's that for a complicated answer?

  • ...you will be workdayicated. I've lived in several timezones, and I just want to be left alone so I can go to bed at 5am like my body wants me to. Latitude, now that's another story. So far I'm loving 65N, but get back to me in February...
  • by Torodung (31985)

    Happy with my time zone (GMT -6:00), would be happier if I didn't live somewhere where there is Daylight's Savings Time. So not terribly happy about that.

  • by mjwx (966435) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @07:41AM (#37325202)
    Time is an illusion, Time zones doubly so.

    In all seriousness, why does it matter. It's not like I get an extra hour in the day a +7 GMT then I do at +8 GMT. It's still 24 hours no matter where I am.
  • currently in cold NSW but wants to be in warm WA

  • I live in Indiana, which sits firmly in the US central time zone, according to some scientists' editorials in our local paper, but is classified as US eastern time zone by our state government. Until a few years ago, we enjoyed not having to deal with the DST silliness, but our state government (much like our national government) decided that they represented businesses, not people (or maybe they decided businesses were people, but that fails because the businesses wouldn't have had as many votes for DST as

    • by tverbeek (457094)

      Indiana is the only state in the Great Lakes region that somehow manages to be part of the old South as well.

  • I would rather like on the ISS !

  • by Abstrackt (609015) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @09:12AM (#37325762)

    I would love to live somewhere that doesn't bother with daylight saving time.

  • I will have heard of it yesterday, but not now.

  • I want to live by GMT, and have all schedules set to x hours since sunrise. (Sunrise would be at the center of the timezone)

    Time would be constant, but schedules would shift.
  • At noon the sun is pretty much directly overhead. Rises in the morning, sets at night. All good.

    Now, if we can get rid of Daylight Savings Time, I'd be a happy camper.

  • One without DST (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Colven (515018) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @12:26PM (#37328646)

    Any location where I don't have to change my friggin clocks twice a year would be great.

  • I was going to write up a bunch of stuff about metric time and decided all I wanted to say was "metric time".

    Metric Time.

    If you want more information Google it.

  • because DST is stupid.

  • Y'know, it can really be quite a pain when all your friends and family live three time zones east of you.

    I can't really game with them in the evenings. By the time I've gotten my kids to bed, it's midnight for my gaming buddies. It's hard to Skype with family when they get together, as they are usually going their separate ways by the time I get home from work. It doesn't help that all my favorite sports teams from the east play their games early in the morning. Nothing like rolling out of bed to try
  • Where is the "A Timezone that doesn't change twice a year" choice? That's the one for me... Enough of these sun games.

  • Having been born, raised, and lived all but a couple of years of my life in the Pacific time zone, one thing I find slightly weird when I visit places east of here is having to wait for those lazy western slobs to get up and get in to the office.

    In a past life I got to the company's European head office in Brussels quite a bit, and worked with customers in places like London and Paris. Not only were we at the wrong end of an eight or nine hour time difference, many of the engineering types were rarely in

  • I really just want to wake up an hour or so later every day, so I think drifting west would be the best way to go. Just each night while I sleep move over a time zone and slowly circle the globe. Plus, think of all the cool places you'd get to wake up

    I think there was an xkcd about this once...

  • ...if you ever lived in "the west", you know the answer. The further west you go, the nicer it gets, parts of the desert southwest (and all of Texas) excepted.
  • This poll is not about timezones. It is about wanting to live somewhere other than where you currently live, but excluding any reference to living north or south of where you live. It is nonsensical. Why even mention timezones? I suppose just asking people where they'd rather live would require too many options.

    • by Ksevio (865461)

      Clearly you don't work for a company with offices/clients around the world. Being on the US west coast can be a problem with clients in Europe but a benefit for clients in Japan. Opposite is true for living on the East coast.

      I guess it applies to gaming too for games that don't have enough players locally.

      • by treeves (963993)

        I'm on the west coast of the US and work for a Japanese company that has customers in Europe and the Middle East, and I don't care what time zone I'm in. I suppose I might care if I did live on the east coast, but that is not an option as long as I work for this company, so I did not consider it. Anyway, most communication is via email, not phone, so it's not a big deal.

  • Unfortunately, I currently live in EDT, and moving spatially in either direction isn't going to help. The only fix is to wait a couple more months.
  • by Shadowhawk (30195) on Wednesday September 07, 2011 @04:22PM (#37332200)
    I exist in all time zones simultaneously.
  • I'm a fan of Mars time, which is to say, a day that's 39 1/2 minutes longer than these Earth days.

  • says it all, though even we aren't immune to those living off the teat of advertising by preaching doom and gloom.

    Never has there been anywhere more comfortable/indulgent to look forward to (increasing) retirement, nor to work on interesting stuff/making it even better unless you insist on relative poverty of those around you as your reward.

    Though I really might appreciate the extra half hour on Mars.

  • I already live one time zone to the east.

    I live in west Michigan, which – according to longitude – should be in the Central time zone. But when they were establishing time zones, Detroit wanted to be in the same time zone as the east coast, and (most of) the rest of the state went along with it. I don't care for the reasons (I have no connection to the east coast, and not much more to Detroit), but I don't mind the result: it stays light later here and than it does in the rest of Eastern at th

  • We should all be on TAI.

  • ...that is the extra time in the length of the day on Mars. Meaning, of course, that I'd be on Mars. How cool would that be?
  • ..for a future in which we just have one Global Earth Time. Oh, and can we get rid of hours, minutes, seconds, please? We could just count time in some sort of decimal way, keeping seconds as unit... something like using kilo-seconds instead of hours. And, while we are at it, we can fix the calendar mess as well, so it is easier to add and subtract time.... but I understand these may be ideas whose time has not come... maybe in 500 years more we will unify measurement systems. Oh, and one more thing: can we
  • I just want a time zone that doesn't jump around twice a year. The moving of the clocks forwards and backwards is annoying.

  • Just wish I lived a bit further south where it's warmer and rains less!

Competence, like truth, beauty, and contact lenses, is in the eye of the beholder. -- Dr. Laurence J. Peter

 



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