Forgot your password?

Do you take a print newspaper at home?

Displaying poll results.
Yes -- more than one, daily.
  822 votes / 2%
Yes -- one, daily.
  4634 votes / 15%
No -- but I used to take at least one.
  8718 votes / 29%
No --and never have.
  11997 votes / 40%
Not in print, I don't.
  3676 votes / 12%
29847 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Do you take a print newspaper at home?

Comments Filter:
  • geezer (Score:3, Insightful)

    by geo3rge (937616) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @11:05AM (#37085516)
    Some of us lived before the internet, you insensitive clod! If you wanted news in the 1950s, you had to buy a paper paper.
    • by PPH (736903) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @12:47PM (#37086422)
      Some of us had to depend on the town crier!
      • by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @01:53PM (#37087044)

        You had a town crier? Well, didn't you kids have it easy. When I was a lad, we had to get our news by reading waterhole tracks and sniffing fresh piles of animal dung while we were dodging tyrannosaurs and brushing up on our COBOL and WATFIV Fortran lessons.

        Now get off my cave!

        • by Lanteran (1883836)

          Oh you young ones had it so good, with your caves and animal dung! We had to sleep in the middle of an open field! We didn't have thees amenities such as "fire". You want warmth, shelter? Go kill that mammoth. And your COBOL, we had to learn damned assembly!

          Get off my glacier!

          • by Teancum (67324)

            Boy are you young. I remember when the glaciers first came down, back when the Arctic Ocean was ice-free and full of plants and other wildlife.

            As for you and your darned assembly, I had to manually wire each instruction with a phone patch chord. Geez, you guys had it so easy with those newfangled assemblers. Hand assembly is the way to go!

            • by rwa2 (4391) *

              ASSEMBLY?! LUXURY!! WE had to wire up logic circuits with nothing but NOT gates made from REDSTONE! Oh, wait, and we STILL DO!

            • by rthille (8526)

              You've got it good, when I was young, we were still waiting for the stars to generate the heavier elements!

      • Didn't you grow up watching the newsreels along with movies, and knowing that the rest of the world was in Black&White, while your part was in color?

        And for that matter, radio. You not only got to hear The Lone Ranger and sports scores, you got to hear Paul Harvey when he was only kind of old, and Walter Winchell, the prototype Rush Limbaugh of his day.

    • Re:geezer (Score:5, Insightful)

      by vlm (69642) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @01:55PM (#37087066)

      Some of us lived before the internet, you insensitive clod! If you wanted news in the 1950s, you had to buy a paper paper.

      I worked for a newspaper conglomerate many years ago. Even back then, the age distribution of subscribers was simply staggering:

      Below 30 : "What's a newspaper? news-paper ... is that like the latin root word where news.google.com got its name?"

      30-60 : "I don't subscribe, but I know someone who does. But, I still watch the nightly network news, and all its prescription commercials."

      Above 60 : "Everyone subscribes to the paper, everyone, right?"

      • We get junk mail flyers, real estate catalogs, the local city advertising rag, and suchlike just about every day. Several actually style themselves "newspapers", but not having read them, I can't accurately judge their claim.

        However, some of them are quite useful indeed, being regularly employed in lighting the sauna furnace or the fireplace. Others are worthless - they have so much coating and fillers in the paper that they don't burn properly, and we just put them straight into the recycle bin.

      • by arth1 (260657)

        Below 30 : "What's a newspaper? news-paper ... is that like the latin root word where news.google.com got its name?"

        People under the age of 30 who would use phrases like "latin root word" or correctly write its instead of it's? I find that hard to believe.

        I used to buy newspapers. In the morning, I got the newspaper, read the obituaries, and if I didn't find my name there, I would brew a cup of coffee and peruse the rest of the paper.
        Then Murdoch happened. Once the desk disappeared and journalists were replaced with blindfold copying, the newspapers lost their value, except as padding in the bird cage, and the increas

      • by afidel (530433)
        I guess people just don't give a crap about their community today. I get the local paper from where I grew up mailed to me as my parents still live there and I live on the border between the county that paper serves and the one where my house and job are. I also get the tuesday/sunday/holiday package from the much bigger large town paper because most of the big county wide news is covered on those days (and I get online access with my subscription) and then I read the local biweekly that services my town of
    • by rwa2 (4391) *

      Some of us lived before the internet, you insensitive clod! If you wanted news in the 1950s, you had to buy a paper paper.

      We had a crab feast at a friend's house yesterday and they had to go out and buy a newspaper... does that count?

    • by 1s44c (552956)

      Some of us lived before the internet, you insensitive clod! If you wanted news in the 1950s, you had to buy a paper paper.

      Sure, but what's the reason to read one today?

      • I like getting up in the morning and reading the paper with all of the local level news that never makes it to the internet in a consolidated places, or is even mentioned on the TV or Radio.
    • don't read all the paper. we also want our turn in the outhouse

      thats why dad bought the paper afterall!

    • What is this News that you speak of. Do you mean these facts that I want hear sources or are they those lies and false reporting that says things I don't want to hear sources?

      They both call themselves news. I think I will listen to the source that I agree with it makes me happier.

    • by mangu (126918)

      If you wanted news in the 1950s, you had to buy a paper paper.

      No, that was the 1910s. By the 1920s, 1930s at most, the radio was an alternative.

  • Weekends, (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    for breakfast. I love a cup of coffee, a croissant and a newspaper. Sometimes the really bad tabloids are also good for this purpose.

  • Missing Option (Score:5, Informative)

    by Lord Grey (463613) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @11:19AM (#37085638)

    Once per week

    My wife and I receive a newspaper only on Sunday and then on every national holiday. The holiday thing is just part of the subscription. What my wife is really after is the Sunday newspaper, for the coupons. She loves coupons and, hey, they save money when we shop for groceries.

    • Re:Missing Option (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Pharmboy (216950) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @12:12PM (#37086146) Journal

      This should have been the most obvious answer. All I can figure is that whoever wrote the poll has never had paper delivery and didn't realize that weekly was an option. Like you, we get the coupons and such with Sunday and have no reason to get daily. Or even read the paper, since it is easier to read the exact same stories online.

      • by vlm (69642) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @01:51PM (#37087022)

        Or even read the paper, since it is easier to read the exact same stories online.

        The informal motto of our local paper is "yesterday's news, tomorow"

      • by jgrahn (181062)

        This should have been the most obvious answer. All I can figure is that whoever wrote the poll has never had paper delivery and didn't realize that weekly was an option.

        There are several options: weekly by choice (get the Sunday issue of a daily paper when you actually have time to read it); weekly by design (the way my local paper works; not much happens in this town); three or four times a week (the way the local paper works in my hometown); and I suppose other variations.

        Like you, we get the coupons and such with Sunday and have no reason to get daily.

        They still have those? I fondly remember the coupons from the 1970s. Haven't seen one for a while, I think.

      • by iONiUM (530420) *

        The way the poll is phrased, with "do you take a newspaper", leads me to believe they're British. Because that just sounds a little bit weird. So maybe in the UK they don't really do weekly newspapers, whereas in North America it's very common to get a newspaper weekly.

    • by pavon (30274)

      I wish the local paper would treat the Sunday edition as a separate weekly paper, covering the most important things that they covered during in the daily paper through out the week. Instead, all the ones I've read the just treat it as just one of their daily editions, only covering the news that happens to fall on the day before, but with a bunch of extra crap (coupons, comics, celebrity gossip, etc), that I don't really care about.

      • Re:Missing Option (Score:5, Insightful)

        by The Man (684) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @01:18PM (#37086726) Homepage

        What you want is called The Economist.

        • by pavon (30274)

          I love the Economist and had a subscription before I went back to grad school and no longer had time to read it. What I have never been able to find is a decent weekly that covers local news and politics.

          Those markets seem to be dominated by dailies both in print and on TV. In addition to the fact that I don't have time to read a paper every day, daily coverage tends to result in shallow blow-by-blow coverage, rather than more filled out coverage after there has been time to get sufficient information about

        • by vlm (69642)

          What you want is called The Economist.

          I like the Economist, although its a little too mainstream to be useful. Something like "Zerohedge magazine", if it actually existed, would be pretty useful.

          Did the Economist ever fix that bug where Kindle subscriptions were like twice the cost of paper subscriptions?

          • Did the Economist ever fix that bug where Kindle subscriptions were like twice the cost of paper subscriptions?

            Had not heard of that one. However, iPad and Android subscriptions are free with a print subscription (so is web access). We installed the Android app on my daughter's phone, so she would stop stealing my print copy of The Economist every time I put it down.

    • by ayjay29 (144994) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @01:02PM (#37086584)

      >>She loves coupons and, hey, they save money when we shop for groceries.

      My wife saved over $400 on a new fridge last week, the week before she saved $500 on furnature. She says she is saving for our retirement...

      • by Javaman59 (524434)

        My wife saved over $400 on a new fridge last week, the week before she saved $500 on furnature. She says she is saving for our retirement...

        I save at least $40/week by buying cask wine, and cigarettes in cartons.

      • by Kittenman (971447)

        >>She loves coupons and, hey, they save money when we shop for groceries.

        My wife saved over $400 on a new fridge last week, the week before she saved $500 on furnature. She says she is saving for our retirement...

        We saved even more by NOT buying a new fridge or furniture.

        • by Pharmboy (216950)

          So you keep your milk bottles in a wet sack, in a dark cupboard? They do need replacing every now and then. And newer models are energy efficient enough to pay for themselves after 5-10 years, assuming they last that long. Lower carbon and all that as well.

          I replaced a 5 year old heating system because the new system would pay for itself in 3 to 4 years, for example. Oh, and I hate sitting on the bare floor, so furniture is nice every now and then.

    • Re:Missing Option (Score:4, Interesting)

      by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Sunday August 14, 2011 @03:46PM (#37088118)

      My wife and I receive a newspaper only on Sunday and then on every national holiday.

      We wanted the Sunday paper for the same reason, and we also wanted access to the electronic version of the paper. For us it ended up being cheaper to get physical papers Friday through Sunday - it's a weird subscription option I guess, but then you don't have to pay for the "e-version".

      Generally I prefer reading the news online, but I also think it's important to help pay the salaries of the people out there gathering the local news. We have some so-called local news bloggers, but they have no idea how to investigate and develop a story.

      • I also think it's important to help pay the salaries of the people out there gathering the local news.
        We have some so-called local news bloggers, but they have no idea how to investigate and develop a story.

        Yeah, I don't... many, many jobs have been replaced by new technology and new ways of doing things...
        a reporter that is staying with a failing paper... deserves to disappear into the night. You have to stay
        flexible and stay ahead of the game if you are in an industry that is getting shaken up by progress and
        technology.

        Anyway except for a very rare one indeed... every reporter I've heard for the past decade+... has no
        idea how to report let alone WRITE a report. So, was there a point?

        And that's why newspapers

    • I don't have a subscription, but I also buy the weekly. On Fridays one of our newspapers has some interesting "supplements" (Reviews of cultural events, interesting interviews, etc) that make it worth it.

      I'd buy the digital version (which despite being cheaper, it's probably more profitable to them), but they manage to screw up the PDF so bad it's unbearable. The images in particular seem to have been compressed using JPEG's max level, and then resized down and up again. It's awful.

    • by Yvanhoe (564877)
      Once per week : Le Canard Enchainé.
    • The problem w/ Sundays only is the automatic "upsell" that some papers like to do.

      After a while, my local papers would start upgrading to "Weekends" for the same great price, then 7 days per week for the same price (for a short fixed period). Eventually it became a full priced subscription that ended up going straight to the recycle bin. At that point, I realize I get my news online and I rarely used coupons, and I'd cancel.

      My folks still read their papers religiously. I don't get why they enjoy yesterday's

  • Why would I pay for entertainment when politicians spend so much time dishing it out for free?
  • If my local paper offered it as an option, I'd take a Fridays-only scrip for the Fry's ad. Otherwise, no dead-tree newslitter for me.
  • I had to as part of school

    "current events" class.

    I can not believe you guys.

    -- Terry

    • Back in the early 70s, my high school had a deal with the New York Times that got them a cheap subscription to the daily paper, and reading it was part of American History class. I had that first period in the morning, so I got to read it when the teacher was also reading it for the day, so we got more newspaper time than the later classes did.

  • I'd much rather read the news in a paper than online, but there isn't a newsagent anywhere near where i live. The local shop only sells the Murdoch shit rag, the Northern Territory News, and i wouldn't even wipe my arse with that. If i want a decent newspaper, i have to catch the ferry over to town and buy the Sydney Morning Herald, which doesn't come in till mid afternoon anyway.

  • I have had a newspaper delivered in the past, but not for many years. The local broadsheet (The Age) has an excellent iOS app and I can read the paper in bed in the morning before getting up on my iPad, and get updates later in the day from their website.

    About the only thing I don't get through the electronic version is the daily quiz and th comics. But given my office gets the papers delivered daily, I read these in the breakroom when passing through at some point during the day.

  • is it just me or is the question and some options make no sense? 'Do I take a print newspaper at home?' what is it? a pill?

    • by MorePower (581188)
      That was my reaction too. "Do I take a print newspaper at home?"
      Take it where?
      • by turing_m (1030530)

        I'm guessing that the newspaper will need to be rolled up first.

      • by Dahamma (304068)

        Yeah, ironic (or intentional?) that they use an expression for "subscribe" that's even more archaic than print newspapers themselves...

    • by LMacG (118321)

      It's as if there's more than one dialect of English! Maybe they even use English in some other countries.

      What is this I don't even.

  • I buy The Age on saturdays but its more of a habit now than anything else. I only really read the magazine. If I want news I go to google. I don't follow links to The Age on sundays because their trolling pisses me off.

    • I, too, get the sunday paper, which usually sits in my driveway until Monday morning when it finally gets tossed, unread. But my wife insists we still need to get the paper.

  • The "crap" newspapers sell themselves on topless photos which tbh aren't all that good. The "good" newspapers are depressing as anything but do occasionally manage to put 3 half decent columns in the same issue. I have no idea why I would want to give money to either category of organisation.
  • The Thanksgiving weekend newspaper was always a killer. I can recall when they were as much as an inch thick after we had assembled them from the stacks of sections. I had over 150 subscribers in individual homes. Getting all that to their doorsteps was a problem with all the trips we had to make going back home to refill our carts.

    However, back then, there was no internet. There were about five BBS systems nationwide, and what few uploads and downloads we had were usually very short programs.

    I used my pr

  • It's probably not as common as Sunday only delivery vs daily but in the Denver area, the Post offers a Thursday/Friday/Saturday/Sunday delivery option which we use. While I do read the paper when we get it (most of the time), we mainly use it to line the litter box. It's just enough newspaper.

    I also pick up The City Paper (Westword) when we're in Boulder and the local town paper which is a weekly but shows up at least twice a week; once by itself and once in the Sunday Post.

    [John]

  • by Animats (122034) on Monday August 15, 2011 @01:13PM (#37096330) Homepage

    Silicon Valley used to have a good newspaper, the San Jose Mercury News. Although they were profitable, Knight-Ridder sold them to "Media News Group" (mission statement: "We will proactively identify and develop strategic partnerships and relationships to enhance our content and services while integrating our content for dissemination across all available distribution platforms in our markets, beginning with the local newspaper.") Most of the reporters were laid off, and there are perhaps three pages of original content in the daily edition.

    The San Francisco Chronicle has descended so far into mediocrity that parts of the paper are produced by Demand Media, the web spammer. Really. The previous mayor of San Francisco commented that "if the Chronicle stopped publishing a paper edition, nobody under the age of 30 would notice".

    Abandoned newspaper racks on streets are becoming a nuisance. Racks in SF were stickered with a city notice like the one for abandoned cars, which basically says "put some papers in this thing or it's going to be towed". Now most of them are gone.

    The US has maybe half a dozen real daily newspapers left - The New York Times, the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, and maybe a few others. Everything else is junk. There are still some good magazines, but the daily business is dead.

  • They promise 6AM but it came a 7AM as rotted outside in the sun all day if the neighbors didnt steal it.
    • I had that happen for a while but my neighbors didn't steal it so I would call and have them credit my account. After a couple of weeks of doing this the problems disappeared. Now if only I could get them to not just fling it out onto the drive way so the bag opens when it is raining things would be good. I swear sometimes the newspaper bag has a much water in it as a bag of minnows.
  • I lost all interest in the newspaper when Bill Waterson retired.
  • Where the "I get a newspaper on Weekends" option?

    On the weekeneds its time to kick back, read the paper, slow down.

    During the week, who has time?

  • My wife is a retired newspaper reporter/editor/managing editor and a news junkie. We get the New York Times and our local Midwest daily. We read them with our breakfast.
  • The only reason we signed up for it was because they gave my wife a special offer/deal. I don't even remember the details anymore, but I believe it amounted to receiving it free for at least the first month or two and some other kind of bonus thrown in. Most mornings, I don't have time to look at it before it's time to head off to rush the kid to school and go to work. By the time I'm home in the evening, I've usually heard most or all of the significant news they covered, so there's not much reason to r

  • I pay 75 cents to read the comics and do the puzzles, the rest of the paper is nothing but bullshit.

[Crash programs] fail because they are based on the theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get a baby a month. -- Wernher von Braun

 



Forgot your password?
Working...