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Annual power consumption at your residence?

Displaying poll results.
0-1000 kWh
  1005 votes / 5%
1000-2500 kWh
  1672 votes / 9%
2500-5000 kWh
  1773 votes / 10%
5000-10000 kWh
  1786 votes / 10%
10000-25000 kWh
  1865 votes / 10%
25000-50000 kWh
  543 votes / 3%
50000+ kWh
  1223 votes / 7%
Depends how hard I work my hamsters
  7147 votes / 42%
17014 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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Annual power consumption at your residence?

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  • Missing Option (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Huntr (951770) on Monday December 06, 2010 @10:45PM (#34469208)
    I have no idea.
    • Re:Missing Option (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Dr Damage I (692789) on Monday December 06, 2010 @11:15PM (#34469478) Journal
      why do you think the hamsters option is so popular? cause it's so funny?
    • I honestly have no idea either... but the bill is a few hundred dollars a month. That's really the only part of it I care about.

      • by AliasMarlowe (1042386) on Tuesday December 07, 2010 @05:58AM (#34471266) Journal
        The net annual energy consumption at our residence is roughly zero. We pay for various energy inputs, but the atmosphere sucks almost all of it away (on a handful of days annually, it may contribute a smidgen of energy to the house). Losses of heat to the ground also occur, but are much smaller.

        At the end of the year, the mass and temperature of the house are about the same as at the start of the year. The net gain or loss of energy is quite small. Ergo, net consumption is negligibly small.
      • by PopeRatzo (965947) *

        but the bill is a few hundred dollars a month.

        Do you line your house with space heaters? "A few hundred" seems pretty high. I think we've only gone over two hundred once and that was the month my wife bought the AC powered massage-o-matic.

        No, seriously, if you're at a "few" hundred, which I take to mean three, you should have an electrician look the place over unless you're running a server farm. Oh wait, this is Slashdot. Never mind.

        • but the bill is a few hundred dollars a month.

          Do you line your house with space heaters? "A few hundred" seems pretty high. I think we've only gone over two hundred once and that was the month my wife bought the AC powered massage-o-matic.

          No, seriously, if you're at a "few" hundred, which I take to mean three, you should have an electrician look the place over unless you're running a server farm. Oh wait, this is Slashdot. Never mind.

          Perhaps he lives, as I do, in a place where running the air conditio

    • by dwarfsoft (461760) on Tuesday December 07, 2010 @01:59AM (#34470366) Homepage
      I thought the missing option was 1.21JWh?
    • The poll assumed that people can just add up the power of some appliances, divide by 1000 for kW, and multiply by the amount of hours it is on per year for kWh/yr.

      I did just that (*click*). ... And then I remembered my gas stove, and gas powered boiler for heating and hot water.

      So I completely screwed up my answer.

      • by lazybeam (162300)

        I got a new meter about a year ago and it is reading "3617, -318". The negative number is the amount of kWh I've sent to the grid from my PV cells. So I call tell you how much my house used with a degree of accuracy!

    • by Zedrick (764028)
      Don't you have some online account on your electricity providers site where you can check?
    • Don't you have an electricity bill at hand and the kw/h price that you pay?

      I know that I pay 135$ per month for electricity at my home, so 1620$ per year, and the price per kw/h is 0.07$, so this gives 1620/0.07=23142.86kw/h per year.
    • by sjs132 (631745)

      how about none of your business?? I pay for it, so nobody should care. Besides, where is the 1.21 gigawatts option? It's almost Christmas time, I've got to keep the lights going to annoy the neighbors!

    • Another: I haven't lived in this residence for an annum.
    • Here's a solid way to estimate:
      Average Monthly Bill / Cost per kWh * 12

      Turns out I'm over 5000 kWh. I have no idea how "good" or "bad" that is.
  • I'm not sure how I should answer this. I generate all my power of solar. Is my annual power consumption the amount of power I pulled off the grid or how much power I use from the panels?
    • by Pharmboy (216950)

      Consumption is consumption. It didn't ask where you got it, or if you bought it or made it, only how much you used.

      • by cayenne8 (626475)
        How would one even know how much power they use in a year?

        I'm guessing somewhere on the power bill each month it tells you your monthly amount, but honestly, does anyone look at that, and keep a running total to see how much they use in a year?

        For that matter, does anyone actually LOOK at the bill for anything other than the amount to send in? I have levelized billing and just pay basically the same amount each month, so I don't ever really look at usage. I mean, it is like gasoline, I need it...I just p

        • by russ1337 (938915)

          How would one even know how much power they use in a year?

          I'm guessing somewhere on the power bill each month it tells you your monthly amount, but honestly, does anyone look at that, and keep a running total to see how much they use in a year?

          For that matter, does anyone actually LOOK at the bill for anything other than the amount to send in? I have levelized billing and just pay basically the same amount each month, so I don't ever really look at usage. I mean, it is like gasoline, I need it...I just pay for what it costs without hardly looking at it...necessities of life and all.

          yes, I do.

          If I use more than 500kWh per month I go looking for the leech.

          • 500KWh per month? You're joking right? Do you live in a one-room shack with a single LED lightbulb and a Mac mini? I can burn 500KWh in about a week, sometimes less if the temp drops below freezing.

            Granted, I have a fully electric house, but I live damn cheaply. I keep my thermo at 66F (thankfully I like it on the cold side), I am newly single so it's just me at the house now, I have all CFL bulbs and I turn off any light I'm not actively using, and I work two jobs plus consulting so I'm pretty much home on

            • by NNKK (218503)

              500KWh per month? You're joking right? Do you live in a one-room shack with a single LED lightbulb and a Mac mini? I can burn 500KWh in about a week, sometimes less if the temp drops below freezing.

              Granted, I have a fully electric house, but I live damn cheaply. I keep my thermo at 66F (thankfully I like it on the cold side), I am newly single so it's just me at the house now, I have all CFL bulbs and I turn off any light I'm not actively using, and I work two jobs plus consulting so I'm pretty much home only to eat and sleep most days.

              So please, in all seriousness, enlighten me with your power-miserly ways. Obviously I'm doing something wrong.

              WTF dude? Get your appliances checked, _now_. Fridge, furnace, washer, dryer, dishwasher, stove, oven, water heater, everything. Or see if another house is tapped into your feed.

              500kwh/week is bloody insane. It's over 71kwh/day, or the equivalent of running 1.65 typical US household circuits (120volt, 15amp) full-bore, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Nobody does that.

              I've lived in all-electric houses. Several of them. With multiple people. None used anything close to 71kwh/day.

              See also: http://www.eia.doe.go [doe.gov]

            • 500KWh per month? You're joking right? Do you live in a one-room shack with a single LED lightbulb and a Mac mini? I can burn 500KWh in about a week, sometimes less if the temp drops below freezing.

              We use about 1000 including pumping and heating water for forty horses.

              Obviously I'm doing something wrong.

              Yes. Using electric heat.

          • by cayenne8 (626475)
            I may go check it out.

            Like I said, I have levelized billing....and pay I think about an avg of $220/mo or so. Considering that the AC down here in New Orleans clicks on in late March or early April, and doesn't go off again till maybe early Nov. (it was 80F here for Thanksgiving, so the AC was on again)...I don't bitch too much about that cost.

            I generally turn lights off in rooms I'm not in...but I have several computers in the house that are all on 24/7...and when I'm home, pretty much every TV in the ho

        • by ottffssent (18387)

          Actually, yes. I can tell you exactly how much (electrical) energy I've been billed for every month for the past several years. In theory this tracks closely with actual energy consumption. I can further tell you that my energy consumption from gas for heating slightly exceeds my electrical energy consumption, but they're quite close (within 1% for the past 12 billed months). My condo association dues include hot water, so my true energy consumption is somewhat higher, and specifically underestimates ga

        • by jeffmeden (135043)

          How do you know you aren't getting totally f****** on the "levelized billing" system? At the end of the year do you sit down and say "I paid this much x 12, and divided by the actual usage it's the same amount plus or minus some error factor" or do you sit down and say "i paid how much they told me"? Because you could be getting taken to the cleaners and not even know it.

          I for one scrutinize my power bill for trends and averages, and look for ways to reduce consumption based on that knowledge. It's one t

      • Consumption is consumption. It didn't ask where you got it, or if you bought it or made it, only how much you used.

        The question is quite inclusive, but consequently also a bit ambiguous. Everyone seems to assume it refers to consumption of electrical power, but the question is not so specific.

        In electrical mains input, we consume about 12000kWh. However, the house has a higher total energy input since some of that electricity goes into a heat pump which produces about 4 times as much heat (transfers energy from outside atmosphere to inside house). This boost would appear to be an additional power consumption at the r

    • by ildon (413912)

      Power consumed = power generated by solar +/- (power taken from)|(contributed to) grid.

  • 0-1000? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by robot256 (1635039) on Monday December 06, 2010 @10:50PM (#34469252)
    I want to know how those people can get on slashdot without using any power. Or do they come on just once a year to post to this survey?
    • by vxice (1690200)
      It says at your residence. It may be that people are going to the internet cafe or work to post.
    • I am not sure if you are trying to be funny, but that is a range topping off at 1000kWh.

      • Re:0-1000? (Score:5, Informative)

        by robot256 (1635039) on Monday December 06, 2010 @11:44PM (#34469698)

        Haha yes I was trying to be funny. But 1000kWh is not very much electricity for a whole year.

        Maybe if you live in an apartment and don't do much cooking or laundry it would come out to that. A fridge is ~400kWh/yr [thegeoexchange.org]. A laptop could be 40W*3hrs*360days=52kWh/yr, and lighting could be 200W*8hrs*360days=576kWh/yr. So you might barely get in under 1000kWh. If you spend a lot of time outside the house, that would obviously be easier.

        • by afidel (530433)
          Many people in NYC and Chicago don't have a refrigerator or even a kitchen.
        • WTF?
          A small fridge like Liebherr IK-1504, which is big enough for a single person, needs around 140 kWh/year. 576kWh/year for lighting you mention is also way too much. My fish tank needs about that amount of power annually and it is a fairly large one.

        • by Halo1 (136547)

          I have a small house (65 m^2), and last year I consumed a little over 600kWh. I have a regular 9-5 job.

          My lighting is very minimal though: one 8 Watt CFL, with occasionally 2 additional 11 Watt CFL's if I need more light (and a bunch of 20 Watt spots that I use very seldom).

          Other than that I have a laptop, a combo fridge/freezer of about 1m40 tall (no idea how much it consumes, but it's 5-6 years old), an electric cooking fire (generally only used on weekends), an ADSL modem/router (switched off when I'm no

      • by jeffmeden (135043)

        I am not sure if you are trying to be pedantic, but the point is to ask why they listed "0-1000" when "1-1000" encompasses a smaller set and still includes all feasible responses?

        I for one would have liked to see a 0 and a 1-1000, since there could be a portion of the /. population using no energy at home (aka they are literally off the grid) and signing in at a library or net-cafe. Finding out if they exist in any amount is more interesting to me than finding out who managed to live a whole year running o

    • 1000 kWh is an average of about 100 W continuously...

      Or it's 1 kW, but only 10% of the time...

      Very realistic for people who are away a lot, as the poll specifies "at your residence".

    • Big solar array. But it all depends on which meter you're reading-- our net for last year was a little over 1000 kWh below zero. But if you just look at the meter that tells how much we used (ignoring how much we produced), it's a big number. Air conditioning in Arizona is a monster, even if you keep the thermostat at 82F.

  • How can we find out? :P

    • by hjf (703092)

      Ever take a look at the electric bill?

    • I took a swag as...

      usually pay at least a hundred a month, so that's $1,200, plus I spend at least another hundred a month in the summer, so that's another $600, for $1,800

      according to my utility's web site, I pay $0.12175 (middle rate of three depending on usage) per kwh, putting me about 15,000 kwh

      ymmv

      • by antdude (79039)

        I do remember elecricity bills going up to $200 during the Southern CA's summer times in the heat waves in this small house. :(

  • Translation (Score:5, Informative)

    by michaelmalak (91262) <michael@michaelmalak.com> on Monday December 06, 2010 @11:01PM (#34469368) Homepage
    • 0-1000 kWh I live in my mom's basement.
    • 1000-2500 kWh I live in my mom's basement and I have a lot of cool stuff
    • 2500-5000 kWh I live in an apartment
    • 5000-10000 kWh I live in a house
    • 10000-25000 kWh I live in a McMansion
    • 25000-50000 kWh My name is Al Gore
    • Re:Translation (Score:4, Informative)

      by Pharmboy (216950) on Monday December 06, 2010 @11:10PM (#34469434) Journal

      Wow, best translation ever. Thank you!

      I will point out, however, that my electric bill is significantly lower in my 3200 sq ft home than it was many years ago living in a double wide @ 1600 sq ft. On the order of 1/2 the bill for about twice the space, meaning it is 4x as efficient. Much of that is better insulation and newer heat pump, plus less environmental exposure, and much better windows. It does show that an electric bill isn't exactly linear with the amount of square footage you are using it in.

    • I live in a desert and don't like heat stroke you insensitive clod!

    • by Cimexus (1355033)

      I chew about 9000 kWh and I live in a SMALL apartment. So that guide isn't necessarily very accurate.

      Having said that, around 70% of that usage is heating. If I had natural gas heating rather than electric, I'd be in the 'apartment' zone, or maybe even the high end of the 'mom's basement' zone ;)

    • by green1 (322787)

      2500-5000 kWh I live in an apartment

      5000-10000 kWh I live in a house

      Maybe I'm absurdly efficient, but I average 300 - 400kWh per month (which by my math puts me in your "apartment" category), and I live in a house... And to be honest, I could definitely be more efficient. I still have 10 incandescent lights that I use on a regular basis (dying to do something about it, but 8 of those are on dimmers, and no matter what they say on the packaging, I have yet to find a fluorescent that actually dims), My appliances aren't high efficiency, many of them aren't even all that new,

    • 10000-25000 kWh I live in a McMansion

      Hmm, I used 10,895 KWH and I live in a small 3 bedroom house that I share with 2 other guys. We'd love to know how the hell it's a McMansion, but heck, you can come visit us and see. If you come in the winter, pack a sweater though because we use mostly electric heat (cheaper than diesel) and so the thermostat never goes about 60. New England -- it's *****ing cold during the winter and ****ing hot and humid during the summer. Just heating to 60 and cooling to 80 is easily 3000-4000KWH/year (more in the wint

      • by Marcika (1003625)

        10000-25000 kWh I live in a McMansion

        Just heating to 60 and cooling to 80 is easily 3000-4000KWH/year (more in the winter, less in the summer, by about a factor of 2).

        There's your problem then - electric heating and bad home insulation. Alas, this is an agency problem: you'd have to convince the owners of the apartment building that it is advantageous for them to install better insulation, oil/gas heating and/or a heat pump...

        • There's your problem then - electric heating and bad home insulation. Alas, this is an agency problem: you'd have to convince the owners of the apartment building that it is advantageous for them to install better insulation, oil/gas heating and/or a heat pump...

          That's a joke right? This house was built in 1955 -- it's a teardown. There's a gigantic crack running down the foundation that precludes ever putting another dollar into it. It has a diesel-oil boiler for heat and hot water. And lead paint in the walls to boot. If this house were sold, it would be sold so someone could tear it down.,

          The only thing keeping this house standing (and wasting energy) is the unintended result of rather strict environmental regulations that would make it a huge hassle to tear it

    • by Xugumad (39311)

      50000+ kWh - Mad scientist at work

    • by hcdejong (561314)

      Prefix those with "I'm an American and...". For Europeans, it's closer to half those values.

  • ((monthly power bill - extra fees and taxes) / avg. price per kwh) x 12 = an answer in units that most people don't understand
  • Over the past ten years, I've been steadily lowering my average annual usage, to about 7000 kWh a year. I fully expect that to continue to drop. And of course, with my photovoltaic array being installed later this week, my consumption from the grid should fall to next to nothing for 2011 and beyond.
  • by DaveAtFraud (460127) on Tuesday December 07, 2010 @12:45AM (#34470022) Homepage Journal

    I thought about how to collect enough information to answer the poll for about a second or two and then voted for the hamster option. Hopefully anyone attempting to compare answers will take into account that most people will only consider their electric power consumption.

    We have a natural gas furnace, water heater and stove. Quite a few people have electric water heaters and stoves and some have electric baseboard or radiant floor heating. Their "power consumption" is significantly greater than mine even though we use about the same amount of energy (I'll ignore the cost of conversion from some other energy source to electric power). My electric bill usually drops to around $30 to $40 a month through the winter so I'm not using much "power" but has been close to $200 a month in the summer when the air conditioner runs. My natural gas bill does just the opposite (high in the winter; low in the summer).

    And then there are people like my sister-in-law who heats her house with a wood burning stove. What's her "power consumption" when she's got the stove going? She also has electric baseboard heat which she rarely uses since it's much cheaper to burn wood in the stove but the two heat sources are complementary. That is, burning wood in her stove offsets a significant portion of her potential "power consumption."

    Really useless poll.

    Cheers,
    Dave

    • I'm in the same boat as you. Spring and fall sure are nice.. I get about two months on each end of summer where both of my bills are nice and low :)
  • My household of a family of 4 averages 17kWh/Day.

    http://mrflash818.livejournal.com/101951.html [livejournal.com]

    (17kWh/Day)*365Day/Year=6205kWh/Year

  • One therm is approx 29.3 kwH. I should have looked that up before I picked my answer. I just guestimated based on the electricity bill this month. Electric doesn't change month. Gas goes sky-high in the winter for obvious reasons.

  • by pesc (147035)

    Why do we talk about power consumption in units of kWh/year. Why not simply measure average consumption in kW (kilowatts)?

    And why do we pay by the kWh and not by the MJ (Megajoule)?

    Don't they teach everyone stuff like this in school?

  • Are we talking about electric only... or the equivalent of all domestic fuels? This would make a big difference to me
  • 1.21 Gigawatts. Thats the exact ammount i would like to use (and have the vehicle too, of course) each time i see the power bill.
  • My residence is entirely powered by steam, which is as god intended, you insensitive clod.

  • I came up to 10285 for 2009. I almost made it in the lower category. I blame the big ol' Dell Poweredge server I used to run. I retired it when I calculated the cost of the electricity I was using and realized it cost more in electricity to run it than to pay GoDaddy for hosting the services it was providing plus a small local NAS. I suspect this year I'll fall into the lower range (if I can get the kids to shut down their PC when they're done for the day).
  • My household of 2 adults and 2 kids consumes about 1000 kWh a month. So about 12,000 kWh a year, which is obscene really.

    But I noticed my bill going up quite a bit ever since I got Mac Pro. That thing dims the lights in the house when you turn it on :D.

    The other large consumer is the drier and washer. These go on a lot since we got the kids.
  • at 0.4$ pr kWh i know damn well how much i use, and i write it down every month.
    Stupid 75% eviromental taxes.

  • I use 2400KWH/year and I generate 1900. Some of you out there don't have nearly enough insulation.

"Lead us in a few words of silent prayer." -- Bill Peterson, former Houston Oiler football coach

 



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