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Sandy and Corporate Greed

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  • by chill (34294) on Friday November 02, 2012 @02:32PM (#41856043) Journal

    The people's jobs, schools, etc. are where they are, not where the empty houses are. If it were that simple then many fewer houses would be empty as people moved across the country to take advantage.

    • I didn't say it would be simple. But jobs and schools are your reasoning? In this day and age of telecomuting?

      • by chill (34294)

        Yes. No one but remote communities telecommutes to elementary, middle or high school. The experience is wholly different and uproots entire families. People attending campus classes in college don't always have telecommuting options as not all classes are available online.

        As for work, any job that is "hands on" can't telecommute. Only the computer stuff can. And while I've seen some small towns in the Midwest encourage families to move there with the offer of free houses, this doesn't scale.

        However, if you

        • In Oregon, lots of students telecommute to elementary, middle, and high school [about.com]. been legal here for 10 years now.

          But the hard part is getting the foreign banks to let go of their massive land ownership.

          • by chill (34294)

            Legal, yes, and I'm willing to bet what you're referencing is rural and remote communities.

            I'm talking about the essential change of dynamic. We're talking kids from NY and NJ where both parents probably work.

            You're proposing removing them from their existing community where all their friends and support groups are. A lot less group social interaction. Most aren't going to be able to stay home unsupervised, so now we're talking changing the parent working situation.

            In short, a massive cultural shift that ju

            • "Legal, yes, and I'm willing to bet what you're referencing is rural and remote communities."

              It's also extremely popular among former homeschooling parents, autistics, and anybody else who doesn't want the social garbage that goes along with the public school system.

              "I'm talking about the essential change of dynamic. We're talking kids from NY and NJ where both parents probably work."

              True enough. Like I said, wouldn't be easy. But we *seriously* need to decentralize in this nation anyway. We're getting a

      • by Bill Dog (726542)

        I think it's typically only higher education that's started down the path of offering some online schooling. There's a lot of competition in that space, and there's room for growing the size of the market if they can convince working adults to go back to school. Compare that with K-12, which has basically no competition and a captive, fully-expanded market.

        And as far as working remotely, even in fields like programming that are ready-made for it, PHB's can't overcome the feeling of needing to keep an eye on

  • We attack the symptoms

    We deny the cause

  • We have enough housing capacity in the US that everyone can have their own.
    Is the reason that we do not related to the reason you need to get a cast off a limb as soon as the bone has knit?

I never cheated an honest man, only rascals. They wanted something for nothing. I gave them nothing for something. -- Joseph "Yellow Kid" Weil

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