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Security

+ - 136 How Lockheed Martin's 'Kill Chain' Stopped SecurID Attack->

Submitted by
CowboyRobot
CowboyRobot writes "A few months after RSA's SecurID database was hacked, defense contractor Lockheed Martin discovered an intruder using valid credentials of one of their business partners, including the user's SecurID token. But the user soon began tripping alarms, including pulling data in stages and trying to access unrelated data. So Lockheed launched its homegrown Cyber Kill Chain framework, which tracks an intruder's movements and blocks each attempt to siphon data. But the Cyber Kill Chain framework isn't for everyone, according to Steve Adegbite, director of cybersecurity for Lockheed Martin, "We have a multimillion-dollar investment in this technology." And that only makes sense for organizations at risk for advanced persistent threat attacks."
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China

+ - 128 China Claimed Millions of Computers Hacked by U.S.-based Servers->

Submitted by hackingbear
hackingbear (988354) writes "While we have heard reports of computers being hacked from China almost every other day, China's National Computer Network Emergency Response Centre identified 7.8 million computers in China had been hacked in the first six months of last year, with the most common location of the attackers being in the US (pay wall). According to CNCERT, 73,286 overseas IPs were involved in hacking China’s 14.19 million IPs, among which 10.5 million received attacks from US-based servers, 780,000 from South Korea and 778,000 from Germany. Apparently, as neither side can prove their claims or disprove the other's claims with absolutely indisputable evidences, the war of words will keep going."
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NASA

+ - 154 NASA's Garver Insists that American Commitment to Space Exploration Undiminished->

Submitted by
MarkWhittington
MarkWhittington writes "Space.com reports that NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, at a space-entrepreneurship forum organized by Stanford University's Institute for Economic Policy Research, insisted that the space agency's commitment to space exploration is undiminished. To support her contention, Garver cited overall spending for NASA as compared to that of space agencies of other countries. But other data, from the money spent on the space agency's space exploration and planetary science accounts to a scathing report from the National Research Council tells a different story."
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Earth

+ - 194 Obama Proposes 'Meaningful Action' on Climate Change->

Submitted by
astroengine
astroengine writes "President Barack Obama called for "meaningful progress" on tackling climate change in his State of the Union speech in Washington, DC on Tuesday night. While acknowledging that "no single event makes a trend," the President noted that the United States had been buffeted by extreme weather events that in many cases encapsulated the predictions of climate scientists. "But the fact is, the 12 hottest years on record have all come in the last 15. Heat waves, droughts, wildfires, and floods — all are now more frequent and intense. We can choose to believe that Superstorm Sandy, and the most severe drought in decades, and the worst wildfires some states have ever seen were all just a freak coincidence. Or we can choose to believe in the overwhelming judgment of science — and act before it’s too late," Obama added."
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Microsoft

+ - 117 Xbox Originator: Stupid, Stupid xBox!! 1

Submitted by Freshly Exhumed
Freshly Exhumed (105597) writes "You can't begrudge Nat Brown for claiming some pride in the birth of Microsoft's game console: ' I was a founder of the original xBox project at Microsoft and gave it its name. Almost 14 years after the painful, pointless, and idiotic internal cage-match to get it started and funded, the hard selling of a compelling and lucrative living-room product to Bill (and then Steve as he began to take over), a product that consumers would want and love and demand, I am actually still thrilled to see how far it has come...' but in his recent ILIKE.CODE blog post he is driven to lament that '...as usual, Microsoft has jumped its own shark and is out stomping through the weeds planning and talking about far-flung future strategies in interactive television and original programming partnerships with big dying media companies when their core product, their home town is on fire, their soldiers, their developers, are tired and deserting, and their supply-lines are broken.' Nat goes on to detail a list of Microsoft's past and present strategic Xbox blunders, while tossing some barbs towards Nintendo's and Sony's game console strategies."
Security

+ - 205 How Lockheed Martin's 'Kill Chain' Stopped An Attacker Already Inside->

Submitted by ancientribe
ancientribe (1057834) writes "Lockheed Martin's director of cybersecurity provided a rare inside look at how the Defense contractor was able to stop sophisticated attackers who had gotten inside its network from actually stealing anything. Lockheed's multi-million dollar Cyber Kill Chain framework, a combination of security intelligence tools and manpower was built to prevent determined attackers who inevitably gain a foothold in the network from taking anything with them. This Dark Reading article highlights an incident where an attacker posed as one of Lockheed's business partners, using legitimate credentials and a stolen RSA SecurID token."
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Education

+ - 169 Missouri Legislation Redefines Science, Pushes Intelligent Design->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Ars reports on new legislation in the Missouri House of Representatives which is seeking equal time in the classroom for Intelligent Design as well as to redefine science itself. You can read the text of the bill online. It uses over 600 words to describe Intelligent Design. Scientific theory, the bill says, is 'an inferred explanation of incompletely understood phenomena about the physical universe based on limited knowledge, whose components are data, logic, and faith-based philosophy.' It would require that 'If scientific theory concerning biological origin is taught in a course of study, biological evolution and biological intelligent design shall be taught.' The legislation's references to 'scientific theory' and 'scientific law' make it clear the writers don't have the slightest idea how science actually works. It also has this odd line near the end: 'If biological intelligent design is taught, any proposed identity of the intelligence responsible for earth's biology shall be verifiable by present-day observation or experimentation and teachers shall not question, survey, or otherwise influence student belief in a nonverifiable identity within a science course.'"
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Government

+ - 199 Earth-buzzing asteroid could be worth big bucks: $195B if we could catch it->

Submitted by
coondoggie
coondoggie writes "The asteroid NASA say is about the half the size of a football field that will blow past Earth on Feb 15 could be worth up to $195 billion in metals and propellant. That's what the scientists at Deep Space Industries, a company that wants to mine these flashing hunks of space materials, thinks the asteroid known as 2012 DA14 is worth — if they could catch it."
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+ - 140 Computer Repair Company Takes Revenge on Devious Customer-> 3

Submitted by herrshuster
herrshuster (2839577) writes "Nerds on call, a small computer repair company, was sued for $500,000 dollars by a customer claiming that they had lost critical information in his litigation. But when they looked into his history, they found this was not the first time he had tried to get money from a company through either his own error or ignorance: http://blog.oregonlive.com/complaintdesk/2011/07/when_store_clerks_give_advice.html In retaliation, they posted an explanation of the circumstances on their site that totalled more than 17,000 words in an attempt to google-bomb his name. Their closing statement: "In the end we won’t label him a scam artist, or assume he had nefarious intent, however, we will let the entire history of our interactions with him stand on their own.""
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+ - 198 Progress Bars 6

Submitted by hyperorbiter
hyperorbiter (876833) writes "How come after 25 years in the tech industry someone hasn't worked out how to make accurate progress bars? This migration I'm doing has sat on "less than a minute" for over 30 minutes . . . I'm not an engineer, but is it that hard?"
Science

+ - 194 Appendix Evolved More Than 30 Times->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "The appendix may not be useless after all. The worm-shaped structure found near the junction of the small and large intestines evolved 32 times among mammals, according to a new study. The finding adds weight to the idea that the appendix helps protect our beneficial gut bacteria when a serious infection strikes."
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+ - 315 PeerJ is changing everything in academic publishing->

Submitted by
Mirk
Mirk writes "Academic researchers want to make their papers open access for the world to read. If they use traditional publishers like Elsevier, Springer or Taylor & Francis, they'll be charged $3000 to bring their work out from behind the paywall. But PeerJ, a new megajournal launched today and funded by Tim O'Reilly, publishes open access articles for $99. That's not done by cutting corners: the editorial process is thorough, and they use rigorous peer-review. The cost savings come from running lean and mean on a born-digital system. The initial batch of 30 papers includes one on a Penn and Teller trick and one on the long necks of dinosaurs."
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The Internet

+ - 269 Is the concept of "Cyberspace" stupid?->

Submitted by
frank_adrian314159
frank_adrian314159 writes "In an article titled "Stop Pretending Cyberspace Exists", Salon writer Michael Lind notes that "Some ideas make you dumber the moment you learn of them. One of those ideas is the concept of 'cyberspace.'” He says that analogizing cyberspace as a real place leads to an inability to think logically about laws, rules, and how and when the governments could or should intervene to regulate the Internet. He states that such a debate is essential, but that that an "[invasion of] a mythical Oz-like kingdom called cyberspace is just as dopey" when talking about governments and corporations taking a larger role in online communications. Is Lind right? Does the notion of cyberspace make the debate over its governance less fruitful?"
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Security

+ - 107 DARPA, FIDO Alliance Join Race to Replace Passwords->

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "Nearly everyone agrees that passwords are the bane of Internet security. For years, industry thinkers have somewhat vaguely referenced the need for Internet fingerprints capable of reliably verifing identities online. Yet here we are, it’s 2013 and passwords remain the primary means of authenticating users onto networks and workstations.

Two groups today announced projects bent on taking passwords to the curb. The first is an industry group calling itself the FIDO (Fast IDentity Online) Alliance. It consists of the computer-maker, Lenovo, the security firm, Nok Nok Labs, the online payment giant, PayPal, the biometrics experts, Agnito, and the authentication specialists, Validity. The second is the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), a research and development arm of the Defense Department.

DARPA’s Active Authentication program initially sought to develop tools designed to protect desktop workstations. The program is entering its second phase, in which the agency is calling for research that sets out to establish behavioral biometrics based on discernible cognitive processes and the observable ways that users naturally interact with their environment while using their computing devices. The Active Authentication program will also need to develop what DARPA is calling a “biometric platform,” that integrates all available biometrics into a single device that carries out the actual business of authentication."

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Businesses

+ - 265 Tesla Battles The New York Times->

Submitted by
redletterdave
redletterdave writes "Days after the New York Times released a brutal review of Tesla's electric Model S sedan, Tesla CEO Elon Musk has fired back, claiming the Times article was completely bogus and misleading. In the article in question, Times writer John Broder took the Tesla Model S on a test drive from Washington to Boston, stopping at various service plazas in Delaware and Connecticut well within the projected 265-mile range of the car, as rated by the EPA. However, Broder’s Tesla Model S, despite a heftier 85 kilowatt-hour battery for an extra 100 miles of range in “ideal conditions,” died shortly before reaching its final destination. Broder blames the cold weather and heating issues for his abridged trip; Musk, however, claims the driver did not follow Tesla's instructions, which is why his trip was cut so short. 'We’ve taken great pains to ensure that the car works very well in the cold, which is why we’re so incensed by this ridiculous article,' Musk said."
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Open Source

+ - 180 DIY Web-Controlled Robot that takes 1 hour to build->

Submitted by
fixpert
fixpert writes "We hooked up Pinoccio (an Open Source, wireless Arduino-compatible microcontroller) to a Pololu 3pi Robot to create an unmanned rover that can be driven via the Web. We posted a quick video where you can see us driving our Web Rover in Nevada all the way from Brazil. We used the iPhone's built-in accelerometer as a super-intuitive interface for driving the bot. You can read all about the project — how we built it, what you need to make your own (including source code), and a simulator of the accelerometer interface that you can play with. We're hoping to make Pinoccio the perfect platform for Software Developers to learn how to hack on DIY hardware."
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Google

+ - 237 More details on Google Pixels found in ChromeOS source->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Details on the Google Pixel have been found in the ChromeOS source code. The device will have a 2056x1700 touchscreen, an Intel IvyBridge Celeron CPU, LTE support and a back-lit keyboard. It's also interesting to note that Sergey Brin has posted a picture of a jellyfish that's similar (colorwise) to the jellyfish in the Google Pixel video. The Pixel is codenamed Link in the ChromeOS source code which contains many references to the device."
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Twitter

+ - 110 Twitter, American Express Letting People Purchase Goods via Hashtag->

Submitted by
Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster writes "What could possibly go wrong with this? American Express has announced a partnership with Twitter, giving customers the ability to sync “eligible cards” with the social network. Tweeting special product hashtags (i.e., #uselessjunk) will purchase a product via that synced card. American Express will then send a purchase-confirmation Tweet, and the usual shipping-and-handling of the product will commence. For Twitter, the partnership also holds significant advantages. If this initial foray succeeds, it could potentially evolve into a workable e-commerce model, and thus a separate stream of revenue for the social network aside from advertising. Also, research has shown that people tend to spend more money when using credit cards as opposed to cash. It’s also quite possible that a streamlined online purchase mechanism—think any number of e-commerce Websites’ “Buy Now” buttons—could compel potential customers to buy more often and in larger amounts."
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