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Piracy

+ - 200 UK court orders H33t, Kickass Torrents and Fenopy blocked->

Submitted by
angry tapir
angry tapir writes "A court in the U.K. has ordered key Internet service providers in the country to block three torrent sites on a complaint from music labels including EMI Records and Sony Music. The High Court of Justice, Chancery Division, ordered six ISPs including Virgin Media, British Telecommunications and British Sky Broadcasting to block H33t, Kickass Torrents and Fenopy."
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Science

+ - 224 New Research Sheds Light on the Evolution of Dogs

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens writes
Hugh Pickens writes writes "The first dogs descended from wolves about 14,000 years ago but according to Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods humans didn't domesticate dogs — dogs sought out humans and domesticated us. Humans have a long history of eradicating wolves, rather than trying to adopt them which raises the question: How was the wolf tolerated by humans long enough to evolve into the domestic dog? "The short version is that we often think of evolution as being the survival of the fittest, where the strong and the dominant survive and the soft and weak perish. But essentially, far from the survival of the leanest and meanest, the success of dogs comes down to survival of the friendliest." Most likely, it was wolves that approached us, not the other way around, probably while they were scavenging around garbage dumps on the edge of human settlements. The wolves that were bold but aggressive would have been killed by humans, and so only the ones that were bold and friendly would have been tolerated. In a few generations, these friendly wolves became distinctive from their more aggressive relatives with splotchy coats, floppy ears, wagging tails. But the changes did not just affect their looks but their psychology. Protodogs evolved the ability to read human gestures. "As dog owners, we take for granted that we can point to a ball or toy and our dog will bound off to get it," write Hare and Woods. "But the ability of dogs to read human gestures is remarkable. Even our closest relatives — chimpanzees and bonobos — can't read our gestures as readily as dogs can." With this new ability, these protodogs were worth knowing. People who had dogs during a hunt would likely have had an advantage over those who didn't. Finally when times were tough, dogs could have served as an emergency food supply and once humans realized the usefulness of keeping dogs as emergency food, it was not a huge jump to realize plants could be used in a similar way. " This is the secret to the genius of dogs: It's when dogs join forces with us that they become special.," conclude Hare and Woods. "Dogs may even have been the catalyst for our civilization.""
Mars

+ - 308 Curiosity Rover On Standby As NASA Addresses Computer Glitch->

Submitted by alancronin
alancronin (1171375) writes "NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has been temporarily put into “safe mode,” as scientists monitoring from Earth try to fix a computer glitch, the US space agency said. Scientists switched to a backup computer Thursday so that they could troubleshoot the problem, said to be linked to a glitch in the original computer’s flash memory. “We switched computers to get to a standard state from which to begin restoring routine operations,” said Richard Cook of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the project manager for the Mars Science Laboratory Project, which built and operates Curiosity."
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+ - 160 Replacing hard drive voids warranty 5

Submitted by Medieval_Thinker
Medieval_Thinker (592748) writes "I replaced a hard drive in my Chromebook and had a question for the Chrome-Ninjas. I got a reply back that my warranty was void. I suggested the tech consult a supervisor about the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975. I should be able to upgrade a hard drive or memory without voiding a warranty. I got this back in reply.

"Thank you for your message.
My supervisor was informed of the situation before sending out the previous email.
Unfortunately we are not going to be able to support your device any longer."

Have the rules changed? Is replacing a hard drive in a Chromebook any different than replacing one in a Dell?"

+ - 219 Can the Valve Company Model Work Elsewhere?->

Submitted by glowend
glowend (1214646) writes "I just listened to a fascinating podcast with Valve's economist-in-residence Yanis Varoufakis about the unusual structure of the workplace at Valve where there is no hierarchy or bosses. Teams of software designers join spontaneously to create and ship video games without any top-down supervision.Varoufakis discussed the economics of this Hayekian workplace and how it actually functions alongside Steam--an open gaming platform created by Valve. I kept wondering, assuming that his description of Valve is accurate, can this model work for other tech companies?"
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Debian

+ - 144 Debian Allows Trademark Use For Commerical Activities->

Submitted by sfcrazy
sfcrazy (1542989) writes "According to the new trademark policy, Debian logos and marks may now be used freely for both non-commercial and commercial purposes. Stefano Zacchiroli, current Debian Project Leader and one of the main promoters of the new trademark policy, said "Software freedoms and trademarks are a difficult match. We all want to see well-known project names used to promote free software, but we cannot risk they will be abused to trick users into downloading proprietary spyware. With the help of SPI and SFLC, we have struck a good balance in our new trademark policy. Among other positive things, it allows all sorts of commercial use; we only recommend clearly informing customers about how much of the sale price will be donated to Debian.""
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Android

+ - 223 Embedded Developers Prefer Linux, Love Android->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "In a recent EE Times 2013 Embedded Market study, Android was the OS of choice for future embedded projects among 16 percent of the survey's participants, second only to 'in-house/custom' (at 28 percent). But if a spectrum of disparate approaches can be lumped together as a single option, why not aggregate the various shades of Linux to see how they compare? Parsing the EE Times data that way makes it abundantly clear that Linux truly dominates the embedded market."
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+ - 292 The Web Standards Project (WaSP) Shuttered-> 1

Submitted by hypnosec
hypnosec (2231454) writes "Aaron Gustafson and two of his fellow contributors, Bruce Lawson and Steph Troeth, have announced the closure of The Web Standards Project (WaSP) which was formed back in 1998 by Glenn Davis, George Olsen, and Jeffrey Zeldman to get browser makers support the open standards established by World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The project described itself as a “coalition fighting for standards which ensure simple, affordable access to web technologies for all." Founded at a time when Microsoft and Netscape were battling it out for browser dominance, WaSP aimed to mitigate the risks arising out of this war – an imminent fragmentation that could lead to browser incompatibilities. Noting that "..Tim Berners-Lee’s vision of the web as an open, accessible, and universal community is largely the reality" Aaron noted that it was time to "close down The Web Standards Project.""
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Data Storage

+ - 276 Seagate to Cease Production of 7200rpm Laptop HDDs

Submitted by jones_supa
jones_supa (887896) writes "'We are going stop building our notebook 7200rpm hard disk drives at the end of 2013,' said David Burks, director of marketing and product management at Seagate Technology, during a conversation with X-bit labs. The mainstream market demand is expected shift to different products, such as hybrid drives. Users who need maximum performance and cares about battery life, have been choosing notebooks with SSDs for years now, whereas those who required capacity, performance and moderate price do not really care about actual performance. With the introduction of third-generation solid-state hybrid drives later this year, Seagate will position them for performance and capacity demanding end-users. The company will also continue to offer 5400rpm HDDs for value notebooks."
Space

+ - 189 How to stop a meteor hitting Earth->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson talks stopping extinction-level meteor hits:

"Here in America, we’re really good at blowing stuff up and less good at knowing where the pieces land, you knowSo, people who have studied the problem generally – and I’m in this camp – see a deflection scenario is more sound and more controllable. So if this is the asteroid and it's sort of headed toward us, one way is you send up a space ship and they'll both feel each other. And the space ship hovers. And they'll both feel each other's gravity. And they want to sort of drift toward one another. But you don't let that happen. You set off little retro rockets that prevent it. And the act of doing so slowly tugs the asteroid into a new orbit.""

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IOS

+ - 247 Apple's Lightning-to-HDMI Dongle Secretly Packed With ARM, Airplay->

Submitted by
joelville
joelville writes "After noticing artifacts and a 1600 × 900 image in the output from Apple's new Lightning Digital AV Adapter, the Panic Blog sawed it open and found an ARM chip inside. They suspect that video bypasses the cable entirely and instead uses Airplay to stream three inches to make up for the Lightning connector's shortcomings."
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Power

+ - 147 The US Nuclear Exit?->

Submitted by Lasrick
Lasrick (2629253) writes "John Mecklin introduces the rather provocative new issue of the Bulletin, which describes the decline and exit of the US from nuclear power. These articles in the Bulletin are free in the March/April Digital Journal, and include: How to close the US nuclear industry? Do nothing; The limited national security implications of civilian nuclear decline; Nuclear exit, the US energy mix, and carbon dioxide emissions; and The economics of a US civilian nuclear phase-out (by Amory Lovins). Also free is the Nuclear Notebook: US Nuclear Forces 2013. Good reading for energy wonks."
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+ - 249 Florida Sinkhole Highlights State's Geologic Instability

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Last Thursday night, a sinkhole took the life of a man (TV news video, with ad) while he slept in his home in Seffner FL, near Tampa. While human fatalies are rare, sinkholes are so common in Florida that the insurance industry successfully lobbied the state lawmakers to pass legislation in 2011 making it more difficult for homeowners to claim sinkhole damages. The bedrock in Florida is limestone, a weakly soluble mineral formed from calcified deposits of sea creatures tens of millions of years ago. Above the limestone is a clay layer called the Hawthorn Formation which shields the limestone from ground water; and above the clay is sand. However, the protective clay layer is thin or nonexistent in some areas of Florida, particularly in the middle part of the state near the Gulf coast, where caves and sinkholes are common. Geologists say that human activity, particularly construction and irrigation, can trigger sinkholes by destabilizing the landscape above caverns by drawing down water tables and massing structures above them."
Microsoft

+ - 178 A new version of Office every 90 days!->

Submitted by Billly Gates
Billly Gates (198444) writes "Of course to get these new wondrous features and bugfixes you have to have a subscription to Office 365. It appears Microsoft is following Chrome's agile development model like Mozilla did. Are the customers who most prefer subscriptions (Corporate) want new things in the enterprise every 90 days? It is frustrating to see so many of them still on IE 7, XP, and Office 2003 which hurts Windows and Office sales and holds back innovation. At the same time the accountants notice significant savings by keeping I.T. costs down with decade/semi decade updates to their images while I.T. only puts out fires in between. Will this change that or will Microsoft cloud offerings with outsourced Exchange and Sharepoint make up for this with cost savings and continually updated software in the enterprise?"
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Technology

+ - 147 'Download This Gun' — 3-D Printed Gun Reliable Up To 600 Rounds->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "We've talked previously about Texan gunsmith Cody Wilson's efforts to create 3-D-printable parts for firearms. He has a printed magazine that can withstand normal operation for quite a while. But he's also been working on building parts of the gun itself. An early version of a 3-D printed 'lower receiver' — the part of the gun holding the operating parts — failed after firing just 6 rounds. Now, a new video posted by Wilson's organization shows their design has improved enough to withstand over 600 rounds. Plus, their test only ended because they used up their ammunition; they say the receiver could have easily withstood a thousand rounds or more. Speaking to Ars, Wilson gave some insight into his reasoning behind this creation with regard to gun laws. 'I believe in evading and disintermediating the state. It seemed to be something we could build an organization around. Just like Bitcoin can circumvent financial mechanisms. ... The message is in what we’re doing—the message is: download this gun.' A spokesperson for the ATF said that while operating a business as a firearm manufacturer requires a license, an individual manufacturing one for personal use is legal."
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