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Submission + - The Privacy Illusion

LoLobey writes: Scott Adams has an entertaining entry on his Dilbert Blog about perceptions of privacy-
“It has come to my attention that many of my readers in the United States believe they have the right to privacy because of something in the Constitution. That is an unsupportable view. A more accurate view is that the government divides the details of your life into two categories:
1. Stuff they don't care about.
2. Stuff they can find out if they have a reason.

Written in response to some reader comments on another entry about privacy guardians and how swell life would be if we voluntarily gave up certain personal info.
Do slashdotters need privacy given that they don’t have it now?

Submission + - Superman's Home Star System Discovered (

kmoser writes: Everybody's favorite astronomer Neil deGrasse Tyson makes an appearance in upcoming Superman #14, in which Superman visits the Hayden Planetarium to view his original planet. Meanwhile, back in reality, DC Comics explains that NdGT has used his "astronomical" powers to select the red dwarf LHS 2520 as the most likely real-life red star to fit with Superman's back story.

Submission + - Neuromorphic Algorithms Allow MAVs to Avoid Obstacles with Single Camera (

aurtherdent2000 writes: IEEE Spectrum magazine says that Cornell University has developed neuromorphic algorithms that enable MAVs to avoid obstacles using just a single camera. This is especially relevant for small and cheap robots, because all you need is a single camera, minimal processing power, and even more minimal battery power. Now, will we see more of the drones and aerial vehicles flying all around us?

Link from Voice of America:

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Extreme cable management, any ideas? 1

An anonymous reader writes: I am not a fan of wireless except for wifi to a notebook, but have gotten so frustrated by the vast amounts of tangled cables around my computers: I have two machines, four monitors, multiple external hard drives, cable modem, network switch, router, usb hubs — everything requires power AND connection to the other devices. The tangles and tangles make it almost impossible to move anything without spending twenty or thirty minutes under the desk. I'd rather untie balled up fishing line than try to snake a monitor cable out from some thirty or so other wires. Anyone have good ways to prevent this?

Submission + - Gate One 1.1 Released: Run vim In Your Browser (

Riskable writes: "Version 1.1 of Gate One (HTML5 terminal emulator/SSH client) was just released (download). New features include security enhancements, major performance improvements, mobile browser support, improved terminal emulation, automatic syntax highlighting of syslog messages, PDFs can now be captured/displayed just like images, Python 3 support, Internet Explorer (10) support, and quite a lot more (full release notes). There's also a new demo where you can try out vim in your browser, play terminal games (nethack, vitetris, adventure, zangband, battlestar, greed, robotfindskitten, and hangman), surf the web in lynx, and a use full suite of IPv6-enabled network tools (ping, traceroute, nmap, dig, and a domain name checker)."

Submission + - Nanowires Improve Graphene Conductance (

MTorrice writes: "Researchers may have found a way to turn one-atom-thick sheets of graphene into a promising material for making transparent electrodes needed in solar cells and displays. Transparent electrodes in today’s devices are made of indium tin oxide films. These films are typically 90% transparent and have a resistance of less than 100 ohms. But they are expensive and brittle. Graphene could be a stronger, lower-cost, and more bendable alternative. However, the resistance of a typical graphene sheet is usually more than 500 ohms. By integrating metal nanowires into conventionally grown graphene films, researchers lowered the films’ resistance. The resulting material is 94% transparent and has a resistance of 64 ohms."

Submission + - Nvidia Doubles Linux Driver Performance, Slips Steam Release date (

leppi writes: Nvidia has announced the steam beta for linux should be out today. They also annouced an increase in performance thanks to Valve and other partner contributions to the driver.

Nvidia said “Steam gaming platform that officially opened to gamers today” while announcing new Linux-optimised version of the R310 drivers for its GeForce graphics chips, including the new GTX 600 series. According to the chip maker, the drivers “double the performance and dramatically reduce game loading times” of Linux games — at least if a test comparing the new code with version 304.51 while running Valve’s Left 4 Dead 2 beta is anything to go by.


Submission + - UK Scientists Claim To Develop 2000 Times Faster Broadband via Fibre Optic (

clm1970 writes: A team of scientists working out of Bangor University in Wales has developed a commercially affordable method of using Optical Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OOFDM) over fibre optic lines, which could deliver broadband ISP speeds that are 2,000 times faster than current services.

Submission + - nVidia: new linux driver doubles performance, hints at imminent steam beta (

Tribaal_ch writes: "With this release, NVIDIA has managed to increase the overall gaming performance under Linux," said Doug Lombardi, vice president of marketing at Valve. "NVIDIA took an unquestioned leadership position developing R310 drivers with us and other studios to provide an absolutely unequalled solution for Linux gamers."

For the number hungry, the press release goes on to say:

"Comparing 304.51 driver performance of 142.7 fps versus 310.14 driver performance of 301.4 fps in beta build of Left for Dead 2. All tests run on the same system using Intel Core i7-3930K CPU @ 3.20GHz with 8 GB memory, GeForce GTX 680 and Ubuntu 12.04 32-bit"


Submission + - Microsoft Sponsors Linux Foundation Event (

darthcamaro writes: There was a time when the Linux Foundation wouldn't take money from Microsoft. That time is not today — Microsoft is listed as a Gold Sponsor of the LinuxCon Europe event, paying $20,000 for the privilege and also getting a guaranteed speaking slot as a result.
Data Storage

Submission + - Should a successful teenage entrepreneur sell out to Facebook? (

colinneagle writes: Andrew Mayhall is 19 years old and is running a server company, called Evtron, whose product has reportedly set the world record for data density (4.6 petabytes per server rack) and has begun attracting attention from investors.

One of those interested parties is reportedly Facebook, with whom the young CEO claims to have had casual discussions about a potential acquisition/hire agreement (Facebook did not respond to a request for comment on the talks). He says the opportunity to speak with Facebook was simply one he couldn't pass up, and seems more impassioned by entrepreneurship. He speaks often of building his company into an EMC or NetApp, and could very well compete with them soon.

But if an offer from Facebook ever comes, should he accept, or try to build something on his own?


Submission + - iPad Mini costs $24 more to make than Kindle Fire HD (

sweetpea86 writes: ... but retails for $130 more. Teardowns of the Apple iPad Mini and the Amazon Kindle Fire HD have revealed that the two devices cost almost the same amount to manufacture, despite the retail prices being significantly different. Andrew Rassweiler, senior principal analyst of teardown services for IHS iSuppli, explains that Apple is sticking to the premium brand strategy it has always used for its media tablet and smartphone products, whereas Amazon is banking on content. Could Amazon's strategy pose a competitive challenge to Apple’s media tablet dominance?

Submission + - What It's Like to Work for a Cloud Service Provider (

Lucas123 writes: As enterprises increasingly consider moving their computing infrastructure to the cloud, IT professionals wonder whether they should follow the migration. Jake Robinson said he remembers the day he really understood what it means to work on "the other side of the cloud." It was Thanksgiving, a couple of years ago. A customer posted an iPhone app designed to give users access to coupons and discounts the following day, Black Friday. The retailer had vastly underestimated demand for the app, and the ASP's database crashed. A solutions architect, Robinson was called in and spent most of the holiday tuning the client's database server to handle the traffic. Computerworld spoke to a half-dozen IT professionals who worked for cloud service providers to get their their experiences.

Submission + - Apple Said to Be Exploring Switch From Intel for Mac (

concealment writes: "Apple Inc. (AAPL) is exploring ways to replace Intel Corp. (INTC) processors in its Mac personal computers with a version of the chip technology it uses in the iPhone and iPad, according to people familiar with the company’s research.

Apple engineers have grown confident that the chip designs used for its mobile devices will one day be powerful enough to run its desktops and laptops, said three people with knowledge of the work, who asked to remain anonymous because the plans are confidential. Apple began using Intel chips for Macs in 2005."


Submission + - Verizon to shut down app store by January (

alphadogg writes: Verizon Wireless is closing down its app store by January next year, it said in a notice on its developer community portal. The operator said it will start removing in January the Verizon Apps application from all compatible Android and Research In Motion devices. It anticipates completing the process by March 27. The carrier's app store, launched in March 2010, has been overtaken by popular online app stores from tech companies like Google and RIM.

Submission + - David Braben Kickstarts an Elite reboot ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: The BBC report that David Braben has launched a Kickstarter for a remake of Elite, the classic space trading game that he co-wrote in the 1980s. It has already received £122,000 in less than a day. Can it reach its goal of £1,250,000?
The Internet

Submission + - Welsh Scientists Develop 2,000 Times Faster Fibre Optic Broadband (

Mark.JUK writes: "Scientists working under an EU funded (3 Million Euros) project out of Bangor University in Wales (United Kingdom) have developed a commercially-exploitable way of boosting broadband speeds over end-user fibre optic lines by using Optical Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OOFDM) technology, which splits a laser down to multiple different optical frequencies (each of which can be used to carry data), and low-cost off-the-shelf components.

The scientists claim that their solution has the ability to "increase broadband transmission by up to two thousand times the current speed and capacity" (most UK Fibre-to-the-Home or similar services currently offer less than 100 Megabits per second) and it can do this alongside a “significant reduction in electrical power consumption“."


Submission + - Portuguese Government wants to put its data in the cloud

NecroMancer writes: "The Portuguese Government is studying the possibility of storing its data in a privately-operated cloud, even the most secret data, in order to cut costs. Politicians are already asking the Minister of State Miguel Relvas about this and Freitas do Amaral is even saying he is perpelxed at the possibility. The Minister of Defense already stated that this study does not include Defense data, classified or otherwise. Meanwhile, the National Commission of Data Protection (CNPD, Comissão Nacional de Protecção de Dados, in Portuguese) is already analyzing the matter."