Submission + - Best phone carrier in the US 1 1

martypantsROK writes: "After nearly seven years of living abroad, I'm planning to return to the USA in early 2013. Last time I lived there, smart phones weren't out yet, dropped calls were common and poor reception (can you hear me now?) was an ad campaign. I'm used to South Korea's wicked speeds, both internet and wireless networks, and wondering what the slashdot community believes to be best carrier in the USA. Which is fastest? Which offers the best deal for unlimited data? Nationwide roaming and coverage? Prices? Service?"
Oracle

Submission + - Nokia bets big on mapping->

angry tapir writes: "Nokia and Oracle have joined forces on mapping, with details of the deal to be announced at the Oracle OpenWorld conference. To differentiate its smartphones from the competition, Nokia is betting big on location as well as imaging technology. Oracle is expected to add Nokia's mapping technology to its applications. Part of Nokia's location strategy is signing deals for the use of its Navteq mapping technology with as many companies as possible. Besides the deal with Oracle, Nokia has recently announced contracts with car makers BMW, Mercedes, Volkswagen and Korean Hyundai, which will all use Navteq map data in some of their vehicles. Garmin will also start using Nokia data on transit services and walking routes to power a new Urban Guidance feature, which will be available as part of its Navigon app for Android and iOS. Nokia's most important partner on navigation, though, is Microsoft. All smartphones based on Windows Phone 8 will have Nokia's Drive application as standard, while Microsoft's Bing Maps geographical search engine uses Nokia data."
Link to Original Source
IT

Submission + - Dysfunctional IT Relationships-> 1 1

snydeq writes: "In large technology departments, dysfunctional relationships breed like mushrooms in a dank basement. 'Your dev and ops teams are no longer on speaking terms, while your junior and senior developers can't seem to agree on anything. IT and legal are constantly at each other's throats. Storage wonks are ready to declare war on the database admins, while sys admins seem to be on everyone's bad side.' InfoWorld's Dan Tynan takes a look at how to rectify tensions that often arise when conflicting demands are placed on the same IT systems. How does your IT department handle friction?"
Link to Original Source
Patents

Submission + - Save the Web from software patents->

TheNextCorner writes: "PersonalWeb's software patent suit against Github and others threatens the freedom of the Web. In order to make sure that the Web can remain a free and accessible space for everyone, we need to rid ourselves of all the patents that threaten its viability. We need to end software patents."
Link to Original Source
Apple

Submission + - Apple Acknowledges iPhone 5 Camera Problem, Says You're Holding It Wrong-> 1 1

SternisheFan writes: "By Jesus Diaz, Gizmodo.com : "After initially denying it, Apple has acknowledged the iPhone 5's purple flare camera problemin an email to a Gizmodo reader. Their solution: "Angle the camera away from the bright light source when taking pictures." Here's their complete answer:"
    "Dear Matt, Our engineering team just gave me this information and we recommend that you angle the camera away from the bright light source when taking pictures. The purple flare in the image provided is considered normal behavior for iPhone 5's camera. If you wish to reach me regarding this case number *********, please contact me at 1-877-***-**** ext. *******. I currently work Thursday-Monday: 7:00am -3:30pm Mountain Time. If you reach my voicemail, please leave your name, phone number, case number and the best time to reach you. Email is ***********@apple.com. Sincerely, Debby AppleCare Support"
    "So it is final, folks: Apple says that, if your photos have a purple flare, this is totally normal behavior of the iPhone 5's camera. You are just holding it wrong. Also, it's not Apple's fault that the Sun is purple.""

Link to Original Source
NASA

Submission + - Former Apple, NASA engineers wed to brew up insane coffee system->

coondoggie writes: "What do you get when you combine work experience at Apple, NASA, MIT and BMW with an expert industrial designer? One helluva cup of coffee apparently. This is no run-of-the-mill coffee brewing system either, unless you have the $11,000 the new Blossom One Limited system costs."
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Study: Fraud growing in scientific research papers->

dsinc writes: In sharp contrast to previous studies suggesting that errors account for the majority of retracted scientific papers, a new analysis — the most comprehensive of its kind — has found that misconduct is responsible for two-thirds of all retractions. In the paper, misconduct included fraud or suspected fraud, duplicate publication and plagiarism. The paper's findings show as a percentage of all scientific articles published, retractions for fraud or suspected fraud have increased 10-fold since 1975. The study, from a collaboration between three scientists including one at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, published online October 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Link to Original Source
Android

Submission + - Galaxy Note II Released in the UK Today

YokimaSun writes: Samsung have today released the Galaxy Note 2 in the UK, the new iPhone 5 rival boasts 16GB of memory, comes with Android Jelly Bean installed, a massive 5.5” HD Super AMOLED screen, 16:9 screen ratio, 1.6 GHz quad-core processor, 3100mAh battery, 8 megapixel camera with best shot feature, S Pen functionality and is HSPA+ compatible. Lets see how long it is before Apple find something to take Samsung to court in the UK.

Submission + - Neanderthals and Early Humans Interbred and Lived in Harmony in Israel-> 1 1

An anonymous reader writes: Early humans may have lived in harmony with Neanderthals and possibly even interbred with them, according to new research.
Archaeologists have discovered stone axes and sharp flint arrowheads of both Homo species in the limestone caves of northern Israel.
The latest findings have led researchers working on the site of Nahal Me'arot, or the Stream Cave, to believe that the two sub-species may have co-existed peacefully in the coastal mountain range currently at war with its neighbors.

Link to Original Source
Iphone

Submission + - iPhone users defend iOS 6 Maps, wonder what the supposed problem is.->

billpalmer writes: "If you believe the tech headlines, Apples new iPhone Maps app in iOS 6 is the worst thing to ever happen to the platform, and it’s so inaccurate you can’t rely on it to accurately navigate you from your couch to your own kitchen. It’s not safe to buy the new iPhone 5, they claim, nor is it advisable to update your existing iPhone, they say. But real world iPhone users paint a very different picture: the new Maps app is a vast improvement over the old Google Maps-based app in terms of functionality, look and feel, and ease of use. I checked in with some typical iPhone users for feedback on iOS 6 Maps, and here’s a sampling of what I received:"
Link to Original Source

Submission + - The Pirate Bay servers offline after raid by swedish police->

An anonymous reader writes: Stockholm police raided the free-speech focused firm (PRQ) Monday and took four of its servers, the company’s owner Mikael Viborg told the Swedish news outlet Nyheter24.
While a number of bittorrent-based filesharing sites including PRQ’s most notorious client, the Pirate Bay, have been down for most of Monday as well as PRQ’s own website, Viborg told the Swedish news site that the site outages were the result of a technical issue, rather than the police’s seizure of servers.

Link to Original Source
Iphone

Submission + - Most Apple users avoiding iOS 6 upgrade-> 2 2

Velcroman1 writes: More than 100 million users have upgraded to the new iOS 6, the software powering the company’s iGizmos, Apple said last week. But according to analysts at data research firm Strategy Analytics, 173 million iPhone users, 85 million iPad users, and 25 million iPod touch users are eligible for the upgrade — -- 283 million in all. Which means 183 million have said “no thanks.” Consumers may be skipping the upgrade for a range of reasons, explained Ross Rubin, principal analyst with Reticle Research. “They could be in contract for a phone that can't update to iOS 6 or have a model that can't take advantage of some key features and therefore choose to hold off,” he told FoxNews.com. “Or they could have heard of the problems with the Maps application and choose to hold off until it improves.”
Link to Original Source
Government

Submission + - WCIT - Most Important Meeting You've Never Heard Of->

An anonymous reader writes: In December the nations of the world will gather in Dubai for the UN-convened World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT – pronounced “wicket”). The topic of the meeting is nothing less than the regulation of the Internet.

Under the auspices of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) the governments of the world will review the international treaty known as the International Telecommunications Regulations (ITR). The last review of the ITR was in 1988 when the Internet was just aborning. The remarkable and reshaping growth of the Internet provides the excuse for the new review. What’s really afoot, however, is an effort by some nations to rebalance the Internet in their favor by reinstituting telecom regulatory concepts from the last century.

Link to Original Source
Programming

Submission + - TypeScript - Microsoft's Replacement For JavaScript->

mikejuk writes: Everyone seems to have a replacement for JavaScript — Google even has two. Now Microsoft has revealed that Anders Hejlsberg, the father of C# among other languages, has been working on a replacement and it has released a preview of TypeScript. The good news is that it is compatible with JavaScript — you can simply load JavaScript code and run it. JavaScript programs are TypeScript programs.To improve on JavaScript, TypeScript lets you include annotations that allow the compiler to understand what objects and functions support. The annotations are removed by the compiler, making it a zero overhead facility.
It also adds a full class construct to make it more like traditional object oriented languages. Not every JavaScript programmer will be pleased about the shift in emphasis, but the way it compiles to a JavaScript constructor is fairly transparent.
At this early stage it is difficult to see the development as good. It isn't particularly good for JavaScript developers who already have alternatives, and it isn't good for C# developers who now have confirmation that Ander Hejlsberg is looking elsewhere for his future.

Link to Original Source
Cloud

Submission + - RightScale, Scalr, enStratus: Comparing the APIs->

Nerval's Lobster writes: "Back in May, I took a look at three cloud management platforms: RightScale, Scalr, and enStratus. Perhaps the biggest surprise was that people from two of those companies—RightScale and Scalr—took note of the article and replied in the comments, offering some clarification on their offerings. (And they were very civil: thank you!)

What I’d like to do next is re-visit these platforms, but focus directly on the APIs that the three offer—not so much coding, but a high-level picture of them. How do they stack up? What features do they have? How do they fit with standards? And what can you expect from the long-term?"

Link to Original Source
The Internet

Submission + - The Fastest ISPs in the U.S.

adeelarshad82 writes: For a second year in a row PCMag partnered with Speedtest to find out the fastest ISPs in the U.S. The results were a product of 110,000 tests ran between January 1, 2012 and September 19, 2012. Collecting data for both download and upload speeds for each test, Speednet was able to calculate an index score for a better one-to-one comparison, where downloads counted for 80 percent and uploads 20 percent. Moreover, rather than testing the upload and download speed of a single file, the tests used multiple broadband threads to measure the total capacity of the "pipe." While the results at the nationwide level were fairly obvious with Verizon FiOS crushing its opposition, the results at regional level were a lot more interesting and competitive.
China

Submission + - Washington confirms Chinese hack attack on White House computer 3 3

clam666 writes: White House sources partly confirmed an alarming report that U.S. government computers — reportedly including systems used by the military for nuclear commands — were breached by Chinese hackers.

I mostly submitted it because I just loved the phrase "The attack originated in the form of a spear phish, which involves a spoofed inbound email with either a link to a malicious website or a weaponized document attachment such as a .pdf, Microsoft Excel file or Word document"

Damn those weaponized Excel files.

Submission + - Supreme Court won't hear body-scanner appeal->

stevegee58 writes: After a long string of legal setbacks, the case brought by Jonathan Corbett challenging TSA's use of full body scanners and enhanced pat-downs has come to and end.
Today the Surpreme Court declined to hear the case so current TSA practices will stand.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Linux 3.6 released

diegocg writes: Linux 3.6 has been released. It includes new features in Btrfs: subvolume quotas, quota groups and snapshot diffs (aka "send/receive"). It also includes support for suspending to disk and memory at the same time, a TCP "Fast Open" mode, a "TCP small queues" feature to fight bufferbloat; support for safe swapping over NFS/NBD, better Ext4 quota support, support for the PCIe D3cold power state; and VFIO, which allows safe access from guest drivers to bare-metal host devices. Here's the full changelog.