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DRM

+ - 224 Blizzard in trouble over Diablo III DRM->

Submitted by The_Myth
The_Myth (84113) writes "Blizzard appears to be under investigation in Korea, France and Germany over Diablo III requiring an "always connected" internet connection to play. The limitations on being unable to onsell or return Diablo III and the lack of capacity on Battle.Net have caught the attention of consumer advocacy groups who are preparing for potential class action lawsuits. Who knew that piracy could potentially cost a game publisher less than legal settlements?"
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Microsoft

+ - 235 Microsoft Unvailes New Ipad Challenging Tablet ->

Submitted by SchrodingerZ
SchrodingerZ (2576405) writes "Microsoft today unveiled its newest piece of technology; The Surface Tablet, a tablet computer meant to challenge the popular Ipad computers created by Apple. The company showed off a tablet that is about the same weight and thickness as an iPad, with a 10.6-inch screen. "The device has a built-in “kickstand” that allows it to be propped up for watching movies, and a thin detachable cover that will serve double duty as a keyboard." The tablet will run a version of Microsoft 8 with the intention of companion hardware being used for innovations on the product. The presentation of the new tablet was to the way in which Apple traditionally opens a new product; giving the media only a few days notice and withholding the exact location of the announcement until only hours before presenting. The announcement thus far has not affected Microsoft stock."
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Amiga

+ - 140 How Icaros Desktop brings the Amiga experience to x86 PCs->

Submitted by
angry tapir
angry tapir writes "Icaros Desktop is an effort to build a modern Amiga-compatible operating system to standard x86 hardware. It's a distribution built atop AROS, which is an open source effort to create a system compatible at the API level with the AmigaOS 3.x series. I recently had a chat to the creator of Icaros, Paolo Besser, about the creation of the OS and why Amiga continues to inspire people today."
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Censorship

+ - 114 Google Reveals What Governments Asked It To Remove->

Submitted by Lord_of_the_nerf
Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) writes "Google has released all government content removal and user info requests in its transparency report (released on Sunday). It's interesting to note that the largest number of info requests have come from the US. Also interesting is what wasn't taken down, despite these requests. On a lighter note, some of the more amusing ones include a request from the Passport Canada office a 'YouTube video of a Canadian citizen urinating on his passport and flushing it down the toilet'."
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Censorship

+ - 115 Google Sees Surge in Censorship Demands->

Submitted by
CowboyRobot
CowboyRobot writes "Silencing speech isn't just for dictators; democracies are trying it also. U.S. authorities, for example, asked Google to remove information 6,192 times in the second half of 2011. Google senior policy analyst Dorothy Chou characterizes requests to limit political speech as troubling. "We noticed that government agencies from different countries would sometimes ask us to remove political content that our users had posted on our services," said Chou. "We hoped this was an aberration. But now we know it's not.""
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Microsoft

+ - 457 Microsoft announces Surface tablet, with kickstand and fold-out keyboard-> 7

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "At its much-discussed “big unveil” this evening, Microsoft did indeed launch a tablet — but rumors that the device would showcase a Barnes & Noble partnership were misplaced. Instead, Microsoft showed a vision for a next-gen PC that combines the portability of a tablet with a minimalistic fold-out keyboard and integrated kickstand. Microsoft’s idea for the tablet (confusingly called Surface) is a device that integrates a better keyboard option than typing on the screen without adding size or weight. That’s where the new keyboard — which doubles as a screen cover — kicks in. At 3mm thick, it adds virtually nothing to the device’s size, but it opens up a world of inputs. There are two covers available — the Touch Cover (very thin) and the Type Cover (with proper, tactile keys). Microsoft is touting the device’s magnesium body, vapor-deposited construction, full PC functionality, and additional features like being the first tablet to showcase a 2×2 MIMO wireless antenna. Windows RT (ARM) and x86 versions are both in the works, with the x86 version apparently having a higher quality screen. No word on hardware specs yet; Microsoft is claiming it “rivals the best ultrabooks” and uses less power than the Core i5. I'm a little bit dubious on that front — and also dubious about how Microsoft's hardware partners will receive this new, rather competitive offering..."
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China

+ - 216 China to Build World's Tallest Tower in 90 Days->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Even since the current world’s tallest builing – the Burj Khalifa in Dubai – was completed, there has been a constant battle to build the world’s next tallest building. The current record holder stands tall at 828 meters and took five years to build, but a Chinese company called Broad Sustainable Building (BSB) aims to smash that record by building the 838 meter Sky City tower, in Changsa, China in a mere 90 days. BSB plans to use prefab building techniques to construct the tower in record time."
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Security

+ - 196 Schneier: Stuxnet cyberattack by US a 'destabilizing and dangerous' action->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "Revelations by The New York Times that President Barack Obama in his role as commander in chief ordered the Stuxnet cyberattack against Iran's uranium-enrichment facility two years ago in cahoots with Israel is generating controversy, with Washington in an uproar over national-security leaks. But the important question is whether this covert action of sabotage against Iran, the first known major cyberattack authorized by a U.S. president, is the right course for the country to take. Are secret cyberattacks helping the U.S. solve geopolitical problems or actually making things worse? Bruce Schneier, whose most recent book is "Liars and Outliers," argues the U.S. made a mistake with Stuxnet, and he discusses why it's important for the world to tackle cyber-arms control now."
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+ - 99 News in Brief: American Astronomical Society Annual Meeting->

Submitted by
AlfonAri
AlfonAri writes "By Nadia Drake — 20 hours of fame — Seen in gamma rays, the sun is usually dark. But on March 7, it blazed for 20 hours after a massive solar flare dumped high-energy particles and light into space. “The sky looked completely different,” Stanford University’s Nicola Omodei said on June 11..."
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+ - 140 Best solution to run an email discussion forum

Submitted by
John3
John3 writes "For the past 15+ years I've maintained The Hardlines Digest (URL omitted to reduce the /. effect), an email discussion list for members of the retail hardware and lumber business. Since the beginning I've run the list on a Windows box running Lyris Listmanager, and it's worked admirably over the years. However, the list now has over 2,600 members and Listmanager doesn't have a nice web interface for users that like to read via their browser. Listmanager also doesn't handle attachments and HTML formatting well for the daily "digest" version of the discussions. Finally, I'd really like to move hosting off-site so I don't need to maintain the server. The list members are hardware store owners and many are technically challenged, so I need to keep change to a minimum and make it easy for them to migrate. I've considered Google Groups and that seems to have most of the features I need. Are there any other low cost solutions for hosting a large discussion list?"
IBM

+ - 109 IBM deploys hot-water cooled supercomputer->

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "With the ISC (International Supercomputer Conference) kicking off this week, there’s been a flurry of announcements around new supercomputer buildouts. One of the more interesting systems debuting this week is SuperMUC — IBM’s new supercomputer at the Leibniz Supercomputing Center in Germany IBM is billing SuperMUC as the first “hot-water cooled supercomputer," an advance it claims cut power consumption by 40%. Dubbed Aquasar, the new system looks like any standard water cooler: water is pumped in one side of the blade, circulates throughout the system, and is pumped out. The difference, according to IBM, are the microchannels etched into the copper heatblock above the CPU cores. Rather than simply being dumped, SuperMUC’s waste heat is designed to be converted into building heat during winter. Presumably it is mostly radiated away in summer, rather than being dumped into the offices of angry German scientists."
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Science

+ - 118 Air Pollution Linked to Chronic Heart Disease->

Submitted by
ChromSolutions
ChromSolutions writes "Air pollution, a serious danger to the environment, is also a major health risk, associated with respiratory infections, lung cancer and heart disease. Now a Tel Aviv University researcher has concluded that not only does air pollution impact cardiac events such as heart attack and stroke, but it also causes repeated episodes over the long term."
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Science

+ - 165 Tracking Designer Drugs, Many At Once->

Submitted by LilaG
LilaG (2576095) writes "Drug tests spot banned substances based on their chemical structures, but a new breed of narcotics is designed to evade such tests. These synthetic marijuana drugs, found in "herbal incense," are mere chemical tweaks of each other, allowing them to escape detection each time researchers develop a new test for one of the compounds. Now chemists have developed a method that can screen for multiple designer drugs at once, without knowing their structures. The test may help law enforcement crack down on the substances.

The researchers used a technique called "mass defect filtering," which can detect related compounds all at once. That's because related compounds have almost equal numbers to the right of the decimal point in their molecular masses.

The researchers tested their technique on 32 herbal products with names like "Mr. Nice Guy" and "Hot Hawaiian." They found that every product contained one or more synthetic cannabinoid; all told, they identified nine different compounds in them — two illegal ones and seven that are not regulated.

The news story appears in Chemical & Engineering News and the original paper is (behind a paywall) in Analytical Chemistry."

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Technology

+ - 170 Ferrofluid tattoos vibrate your skin in response to calls and texts->

Submitted by
ericjones12398
ericjones12398 writes "Nokia is bringing tattoos into the high-tech world. The telecommunications giant recently filed a patent for the world's first smart tattoos. Made of ferromagnetic material, the tattoo would vibrate when your smartphone received incoming phone calls, texts and emails.
The tattoo is either cool or creepy depending on your attitude toward such things as tattoos and cyborg implants. But human cyborg technology is nothing new. Indeed, Nokia's vibrating magnetic tattoos are part of a broader trend in technology. No longer content to carry gadgets, there's a movement toward getting the conveniences of smartphones and other electronic devices embedded right in your body."

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Intel

+ - 138 Intel Announces Xeon Phi For "Exascale" Computing->

Submitted by
MojoKid
MojoKid writes "At the International Supercomputing Conference today, Intel announced that Knights corner, the company's first commercial Many Integrated Core (MIC) product will ship commercially in 2012. The descendent of the processor formerly known as Larrabee also gets a new brand name--Xeon Phi. The idea behind Intel's new push is that the highly efficient Xeon E5 architecture (eight-core, 32nm Sandy Bridge) fuels the basic x86 cluster, while the Many Integrated Core CPUs that grew out of the failed Larrabee GPU offer unparalleled performance scaling and break new ground. The challenges Intel is trying to surmount are considerable. We've successfully pushed from teraflops to petaflops, but exaflops (or exascale computing) currently demands more processors and power than it's feasible to provide in the next 5-7 years. Intel's MIC is targeted at hammering away at that barrier and create new opportunities for supercomputing deployments."
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Power

+ - 107 The State of the Smart Grid->

Submitted by be new here
be new here (1431563) writes "The "smart grid" has been hyped for years, with talks of everything from utility frequency changes and better energy management. But what is the current state of the smart grid, and what changes are imminent in the immediate future? This article analyzes the smart grid in terms of the consumer/business end and the utility companies' end (the micro- and macro-side, respectively) as to what makes the grid "smart" now, as well as what we can expect within the next year or so. Also interesting is Cisco's involvement in the grid with their new "rugged" grid routers, featured in the R&D stage in the article's video."
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Government

+ - 180 US government spending $19 million to assign contractors a number->

Submitted by Sparticus789
Sparticus789 (2625955) writes "A GAO report shows that "The government handles more than $1 trillion a year in contracts and grants. Washington needs to assign a unique number to each one of them, to track all the businesses and other entities it deals with. For more than three decades, it has turned to one company — Dun & Bradstreet — for its numbering needs." The article goes on to say "the government is now spending roughly $19 million a year on the system that cost just $1 million annually one decade ago."

The database only contains 625,000 entries, how many better ways are there to store this same amount of data?"

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+ - 121 Sun-believable Solar Nonotechnology May Revolutionize Renewables->

Submitted by
jackandtoby
jackandtoby writes "A team of scientists and engineers led by Professor Prashant Kamat is generating energy from solar paint. Building on recent advances in semiconductor nanocrystal research, they’ve developed a one-coat solar paint for designing quantum dot solar cells. Generating energy may soon be a brushstroke away."
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Cloud

+ - 115 The Plot To Get Larry Ellison -> 1

Submitted by
pacopico
pacopico writes "Facebook IPO got you down? Fear not, Silicon Valley has already picked another darling. It's Workday, a cloud computing start-up that is selling HR and finance software. Businessweek reports that it's going to IPO this month, seeking about $500 million and that it's taking some big, big money sales from Oracle and SAP. Dave Duffield, the founder of PeopleSoft, founded Workday to make life tough on Larry Ellison and seems to be succeeding, according to the story. Michael Dell, Jeff Bezos and Reid Hoffman have invested $250 million in this Ellison attack."
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