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Cloud

+ - 201 The concept of private cloud is fundamentally flawed, says Salesforce->

Submitted by concertina226
concertina226 (2447056) writes "Speaking at the Cloud Computing World forum in London today, JP Rangaswami said that cloud provides the scalability and flexibility that organisations need to survive in the modern age. However, organisations that choose to adopt private rather than public cloud will miss out on the benefits.

“Whenever anyone uses that phrase to you, just ask them who are you sharing costs with. If all the costs you’re sharing are just with you, you’re just kidding yourself, it ain’t a cloud” said Rangaswami.

“The only way it has value is if someone else is taking the risk, and you can step it up or down. This isn’t just a question of infrastructure; IT is not just about hardware. Your processes have to be able to scale, your ability to put things on and take things off has to be able to scale – everything you do has to be able to scale in both directions.”

What do you think? Is private cloud flawed or is Rangaswami barking up the wrong tree?"

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The Internet

+ - 192 The 10 strangest domain name proposals->

Submitted by Velcroman1
Velcroman1 (1667895) writes "Apple, Sony and American Express are among companies that are seeking eponymous domain names using their brands, according to the newly revealed list of new gTLDs that have been applied for. You'd expect those big brands to buy in. But the list of domain name proposals runs the gamut from obvious to extraordinary. From .george to .ooo (with a stop at .ketchup and .plumbing) Here are the ten strangest."
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Medicine

+ - 238 Drug company disguised advertising as science->

Submitted by
ananyo
ananyo writes "A former pharmaceutical company employee has blown the whistle on drug promotion disguised as science.
Drug companies occasionally conduct post-marketing studies to collect data on the safety and efficacy of drugs in the real world, after they’ve been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. “However,” writes the anonymous author in an editorial in the British Medical Journal (subscription), “some of the [post-marketing] studies I worked on were not designed to determine the overall risk:benefit balance of the drug in the general population. They were designed to support and disseminate a marketing message.”
According to the whistleblower, the results of these studies were often dubious. “We occasionally resorted to ‘playing’ with the data that had originally failed to show the expected result,” he says. “This was done by altering the statistical method until any statistical significance was found.” He adds that the company sometimes omitted negative results and played down harmful side effects.
Nature says it was unable to work out who the writer was but they likely worked on diabetes and the studies criticized were from the Denmark-based pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk."

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China

+ - 155 Attacks Targeting US Defense Contractors and Universities Tied to China->

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "Researchers have identified an ongoing series of attacks, possibly emanating from China, that are targeting a number of high-profile organizations, including SCADA security companies, universities and defense contractors. The attacks are using highly customized malicious files to entice targeted users into opening them and starting the compromise.

The attack campaign is using a series of hacked servers as command-and-control points and researchers say that the tactics and tools used by the attackers indicates that they may be located in China. The first evidence of the campaign was an attack on Digitalbond, a company that provides security services for ICS systems. The attack begins with a spear phishing email sent to employees of the targeted company and containing a PDF attachment.

In addition to the attack on Digitalbond, researchers have found that the campaign also has hit users at Carnegie Mellon University, Purdue University and the University of Rhode Island. Also, the Chertoff Group, a consultancy headed by former secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff, and NJVC, another defense contractor, have been targeted. Carnegie Mellon and Purdue both have high-profile computer security programs."

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Android

+ - 144 Tablet App Development - Best Reference / Cookbooks?

Submitted by LazyBoyWrangler
LazyBoyWrangler (760913) writes "I'm an ancient Linux developer (well over thirty) who has been buried in developing and maintaining code for a couple of clients for the past ten years. One of these clients is asking me for development of a remote, secure tablet based application running on (most likely) Android due to client platform distribution cost (250-500 remote clients connecting via SSL-TCP/IP). I'm not discounting Apple either — I strongly recommend use of Apple platforms to my clients. I've got a long standing hatred of Windows platforms due to my costs/pain in supporting anything on them. I just can't afford the time and misery helping one more person with Windows, and the platform instability in terms of user interface/version changes drives me insane.

In the past, I've found O'Reilly books fit my learning style weil enuogh — I have a San Diego quality zoo, not a library. What resources do people recommend for a very experienced developer who has written hundreds of thousands of lines of secure communication / banking code?

Any thoughts?"
Patents

+ - 127 The "Defensive Patent License" an open defensive patent pool

Submitted by capedgirardeau
capedgirardeau (531367) writes "Via Cory Doctorow at BoingBoing:
Ars Technica's Jon Brodkin has an in-depth look at the "Defensive Patent License," a kind of judo for the patent system created by ... EFF's Jason Schultz (who started EFF's Patent Busting Project) and ... Jen Urban (who co-created the ChillingEffects clearinghouse). As you'd expect from two such killer legal freedom fighters, the DPL is audacious, exciting, and wicked cool. It's a license pool that companies opt into, and members of the pool pledge not to sue one another for infringement. If you're ever being sued for patent infringement, you can get an automatic license to a conflicting patent just by throwing your patents into the pool. The more patent trolls threaten people, the more incentive there is to join the league of Internet patent freedom fighters."
Programming

+ - 191 Snopes.com debunks old C++ 'interview' hoax->

Submitted by
netbuzz
netbuzz writes "If this one has escaped your attention, the claim goes like this: “C++ designer Bjarne Stroustrup admitted in an interview that he developed the language solely to create high-paying jobs for programmers.” The 1998 “interview,” which never happened, also “quotes” Stroustrup saying all kinds of outrageous things about his motivations for designing C++, and has dogged him throughout the years, even earning a place on his Web site’s FAQ page. Last week Snopes stepped up and put its official “false” on the still-circulating versions of the fictitious “interview.” Does Stroustrup think it will help put the matter to rest? “Not really.”"
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Medicine

+ - 160 MIT creates glucose fuel cell to power implanted brain-computer interfaces->

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "Neuroengineers at MIT have created a implantable fuel cell that generates electricity from the glucose present in the cerebrospinal fluid that flows around your brain and spinal cord. The glucose-powered fuel cell is crafted out of silicon and platinum, using standard semiconductor fabrication processes. The platinum acts as a catalyst, stripping electrons from glucose molecules, similar to how aerobic animal cells (such as our own) strip electrons from glucose with enzymes and oxygen. The glucose fuel cell products hundreds of microwatts (i.e. tenths of a milliwatt), which is a surprisingly large amount — it comparable to the solar cell on a calculator, for example. This should be more than enough power to drive complex computers — or perhaps more interestingly, trigger clusters of neurons in the brain. In theory, this glucose fuel cell will actually deprive your brain of some energy, though in practice you probably won’t notice (or you might find yourself growing hungry sooner)"
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Businesses

+ - 207 Employees Admit They'd Walk Out With Stolen Data If Fired->

Submitted by Gunkerty Jeb
Gunkerty Jeb (1950964) writes "In a recent survey of IT managers and executives, nearly half of respondents admitted that if they were fired tomorrow they would walk out with proprietary data such as privileged password lists, company databases, R&D plans and financial reports — even though they know they are not entitled to it. So, it's no surprise that 71 percent believe the insider threat is the priority security concern and poses the most significant business risk. Despite growing awareness of the need to better monitor privileged accounts, only 57 percent say they actively do so. The other 43 percent weren't sure or knew they didn't. And of those that monitored, more than half said they could get around the current controls."
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DRM

+ - 190 Google DRM software threatens social media->

Submitted by
ericjones12398
ericjones12398 writes "The RIAA has always been a little twitchy about music copyrights, and that’s putting it mildly. The latest front in the war on piracy (or fair use, depending on where you stand) is YouTube. Filled with album cuts, live versions and amateur covers, it’s become a stronghold of sharing media without file sharing. Needless to say, this isn’t the record industry’s favorite practice. But while technology exists to catch the album version of a song or an official live release, there’s nothing that can prevent you from uploading an iPhone video from the last concert you went to or even recording your own version of a song without permission from the songwriter.

Google, however, is looking to change all that with its new Melody Identification DRM. The Mountain View-based company recently applied for a patent that will (allegedly) be able to pull a melody out of a song, allowing YouTube to recognize when your 14-year-old daughter has uploaded a video of herself singing the latest Katy Perry jam. The goal is to help the record industry crack down on copyright infringement that is currently difficult to detect."

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Privacy

+ - 165 Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have 'Nothing to Hide'->

Submitted by zer0point
zer0point (2442768) writes "When the government gathers or analyzes personal information, many people say they're not worried. "I've got nothing to hide," they declare. "Only if you're doing something wrong should you worry, and then you don't deserve to keep it private."

"The nothing-to-hide argument pervades discussions about privacy. The data-security expert Bruce Schneier calls it the "most common retort against privacy advocates." The legal scholar Geoffrey Stone refers to it as an "all-too-common refrain." In its most compelling form, it is an argument that the privacy interest is generally minimal, thus making the contest with security concerns a foreordained victory for security."

Excellent article that highlights why Mark Zuckerberg's "end of privacy" mandate will never be the norm."

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Linux

+ - 128 Linus Torvalds awarded the Millenial Technology Prize->

Submitted by Karrde712
Karrde712 (125745) writes "In a first for the Millenial Technology Prize, both Laureates were awarded the prize. Linus Torvalds was recognized for the creation of the Linux kernel and its continuing impact on enhancing scientific progress throughout the world. Dr. Shinya Yamanaka was recognized for his work in the development of induced pluripotent stem cells for medical research."
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AMD

+ - 105 AMD licenses ARM CPU for Security - First step into a larger world->

Submitted by
Vigile
Vigile writes "Today AMD is making an announcement that is the first step in a drastic transition for the company by integrating an ARM Cortex A5 processor on the same die with upcoming Fusion APUs. Starting in late 2013, all AMD APUs (processors that are combinations of x86 cores and Radeon SIMD arrays) will also integrate an ARM Cortex A5 processor to handle security for online transactions, banking, identity protection and DRM integration. The A5 is the smallest Cortex processor available, and that would make sense to use it in a full APU so it will not take up more than 10-15 square mm of die space. This marks the first time AMD has licensed ARM technology and while many people were speculating a pure ARM+Radeon hybrid, this move today is being described as the "first step" for AMD down a new road of dexterity as an IP-focused technology company with their GPU technology as “the crown jewel”. So while today's announcement might focus on using ARM processors for security purposes, the future likely holds much more these two partners."
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Microsoft

+ - 122 Windows RT will cost OEMs $85: Harakiri, or some kind of genius plan? ->

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "Good news: Last month’s unbelievable rumors that a Windows RT (Windows 8 ARM) licenses would cost OEMs $90-100 were off the mark — in actual fact, as confirmed by multiple vendors at Computex in Taiwan, the Windows RT license cost is only $80-95. At this point, we’re not entirely sure what Microsoft’s plan for Windows RT is. It would seem that Microsoft doesn’t want to flood the markets with cheap Windows RT tablets. At this rate, though, we would expect the cheapest Windows RT tablets to hit the market at around $600, with top-spec models (if they exist) in the $800-900 range — well above Android tablets or the iPad. We can only assume that Microsoft doesn’t want to go head-to-head with iOS and Android, instead trying to stake out a position at the top end of the market. Whether this is a good plan, with x86 tablets and their full 20-year PC ecosystem also vying for market share, remains to be seen."
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Blackberry

+ - 96 iOS apps made to run on the BlackBerry PlayBook->

Submitted by zer0point
zer0point (2442768) writes "Businesscat2000, over on the CrackBerry Forums, has posted multiple videos of a rather incredible feat he has achieved: porting iOS apps to run on the PlayBook OS. His initial claim has been met with a wave of dubiety and skepticism, as it should be given the general difficulty of porting anything iOS-related, but he has silenced the doubters by porting over an iPhone-only app sent to him directly by CrackBerry's Kevin Michaluk, getting it up and running on the PlayBook within an hour. We've also seen the iOS versions of Tiny Tower, TomTom's navigation app, and a number of others demonstrated."
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Wireless Networking

+ - 101 Virgin Media amends London Underground WiFi snooping clause->

Submitted by Qedward
Qedward (2499046) writes "Virgin Media has amended a clause in the terms and conditions for users of its London Underground Wi-Fi service, which went live last week, in response to complaints from privacy campaigners.

Originally, the T&Cs stated that Virgin Media “may monitor email and internet communications, including without limitation, any content or material transmitted over the services”.

The suggestion that Virgin Media could be snooping on customers' communications raised the ire of MPs and privacy campaigners alike, with conservative MP Robert Halfon suggesting that “a surveillance society is being created on the Underground”..."

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