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Businesses

+ - 207 Employees Admit They'd Walk Out With Stolen Data If Fired->

Submitted by Gunkerty Jeb
Gunkerty Jeb (1950964) writes "In a recent survey of IT managers and executives, nearly half of respondents admitted that if they were fired tomorrow they would walk out with proprietary data such as privileged password lists, company databases, R&D plans and financial reports — even though they know they are not entitled to it. So, it's no surprise that 71 percent believe the insider threat is the priority security concern and poses the most significant business risk. Despite growing awareness of the need to better monitor privileged accounts, only 57 percent say they actively do so. The other 43 percent weren't sure or knew they didn't. And of those that monitored, more than half said they could get around the current controls."
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DRM

+ - 190 Google DRM software threatens social media->

Submitted by
ericjones12398
ericjones12398 writes "The RIAA has always been a little twitchy about music copyrights, and that’s putting it mildly. The latest front in the war on piracy (or fair use, depending on where you stand) is YouTube. Filled with album cuts, live versions and amateur covers, it’s become a stronghold of sharing media without file sharing. Needless to say, this isn’t the record industry’s favorite practice. But while technology exists to catch the album version of a song or an official live release, there’s nothing that can prevent you from uploading an iPhone video from the last concert you went to or even recording your own version of a song without permission from the songwriter.

Google, however, is looking to change all that with its new Melody Identification DRM. The Mountain View-based company recently applied for a patent that will (allegedly) be able to pull a melody out of a song, allowing YouTube to recognize when your 14-year-old daughter has uploaded a video of herself singing the latest Katy Perry jam. The goal is to help the record industry crack down on copyright infringement that is currently difficult to detect."

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Privacy

+ - 165 Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have 'Nothing to Hide'->

Submitted by zer0point
zer0point (2442768) writes "When the government gathers or analyzes personal information, many people say they're not worried. "I've got nothing to hide," they declare. "Only if you're doing something wrong should you worry, and then you don't deserve to keep it private."

"The nothing-to-hide argument pervades discussions about privacy. The data-security expert Bruce Schneier calls it the "most common retort against privacy advocates." The legal scholar Geoffrey Stone refers to it as an "all-too-common refrain." In its most compelling form, it is an argument that the privacy interest is generally minimal, thus making the contest with security concerns a foreordained victory for security."

Excellent article that highlights why Mark Zuckerberg's "end of privacy" mandate will never be the norm."

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Linux

+ - 128 Linus Torvalds awarded the Millenial Technology Prize->

Submitted by Karrde712
Karrde712 (125745) writes "In a first for the Millenial Technology Prize, both Laureates were awarded the prize. Linus Torvalds was recognized for the creation of the Linux kernel and its continuing impact on enhancing scientific progress throughout the world. Dr. Shinya Yamanaka was recognized for his work in the development of induced pluripotent stem cells for medical research."
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AMD

+ - 105 AMD licenses ARM CPU for Security - First step into a larger world->

Submitted by
Vigile
Vigile writes "Today AMD is making an announcement that is the first step in a drastic transition for the company by integrating an ARM Cortex A5 processor on the same die with upcoming Fusion APUs. Starting in late 2013, all AMD APUs (processors that are combinations of x86 cores and Radeon SIMD arrays) will also integrate an ARM Cortex A5 processor to handle security for online transactions, banking, identity protection and DRM integration. The A5 is the smallest Cortex processor available, and that would make sense to use it in a full APU so it will not take up more than 10-15 square mm of die space. This marks the first time AMD has licensed ARM technology and while many people were speculating a pure ARM+Radeon hybrid, this move today is being described as the "first step" for AMD down a new road of dexterity as an IP-focused technology company with their GPU technology as “the crown jewel”. So while today's announcement might focus on using ARM processors for security purposes, the future likely holds much more these two partners."
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Microsoft

+ - 122 Windows RT will cost OEMs $85: Harakiri, or some kind of genius plan? ->

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "Good news: Last month’s unbelievable rumors that a Windows RT (Windows 8 ARM) licenses would cost OEMs $90-100 were off the mark — in actual fact, as confirmed by multiple vendors at Computex in Taiwan, the Windows RT license cost is only $80-95. At this point, we’re not entirely sure what Microsoft’s plan for Windows RT is. It would seem that Microsoft doesn’t want to flood the markets with cheap Windows RT tablets. At this rate, though, we would expect the cheapest Windows RT tablets to hit the market at around $600, with top-spec models (if they exist) in the $800-900 range — well above Android tablets or the iPad. We can only assume that Microsoft doesn’t want to go head-to-head with iOS and Android, instead trying to stake out a position at the top end of the market. Whether this is a good plan, with x86 tablets and their full 20-year PC ecosystem also vying for market share, remains to be seen."
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Blackberry

+ - 96 iOS apps made to run on the BlackBerry PlayBook->

Submitted by zer0point
zer0point (2442768) writes "Businesscat2000, over on the CrackBerry Forums, has posted multiple videos of a rather incredible feat he has achieved: porting iOS apps to run on the PlayBook OS. His initial claim has been met with a wave of dubiety and skepticism, as it should be given the general difficulty of porting anything iOS-related, but he has silenced the doubters by porting over an iPhone-only app sent to him directly by CrackBerry's Kevin Michaluk, getting it up and running on the PlayBook within an hour. We've also seen the iOS versions of Tiny Tower, TomTom's navigation app, and a number of others demonstrated."
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Wireless Networking

+ - 101 Virgin Media amends London Underground WiFi snooping clause->

Submitted by Qedward
Qedward (2499046) writes "Virgin Media has amended a clause in the terms and conditions for users of its London Underground Wi-Fi service, which went live last week, in response to complaints from privacy campaigners.

Originally, the T&Cs stated that Virgin Media “may monitor email and internet communications, including without limitation, any content or material transmitted over the services”.

The suggestion that Virgin Media could be snooping on customers' communications raised the ire of MPs and privacy campaigners alike, with conservative MP Robert Halfon suggesting that “a surveillance society is being created on the Underground”..."

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Firefox

+ - 134 Firefox 14 Beta Arrives with an Extra Shot of Security-> 1

Submitted by zer0point
zer0point (2442768) writes "Mozilla's new Firefox 13 browser may have just barely landed on users' PCs, but already forward-looking fans can check out the beta version of Firefox 14. Most notable in Firefox 14 are new security features that “make it easier for users to control their Web experience,” according to the official announcement late last week on the Mozilla blog.

Several new features in the upcoming version of this popular free and open source browser are designed to make life better for users, in fact."

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Android

+ - 134 Android's One Killer Feature That Beats the iPhone

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens writes
Hugh Pickens writes writes "Jason Hiner writes at Cnet that it's hard to argue that Android is more usable than iOS overall and the truth is that iOS is a more limited, simplified experience that makes it easy for most users to pick up and start using right away but there's still one key feature that Apple isn't likely to improve enough to catch up with Android: The alerts system on the Android is just flat out more useful and more usable than iPhone's giving the user timely updates of important information, quickly letting you know about things that need your attention, and giving you an at-a-glance look at your latest messages from various sources. "What I'm really talking about when I say "immediate glance-ability" is that when you turn on the display on your Android phone you see a bunch of little badges in the top left corner of the screen that let you know you've got new messages or that a calendar appointment is about to happen or someone is talking about you on social media or there's a severe weather alert in your area," writes Hiner. Apple made big strides with its alerts system in iOS 5 — taking obvious inspiration from Android — but even the vastly-improved alerts system still didn't match the power and efficiency of what Android offers. "Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of other things that Android does better than iPhone — for example, turn-by-turn GPS navigation and Google Voice integration," concludes Hiner. "[But] alerts represent the one area where Android is a lot more friendly and usable than iOS, and that's unlikely to change any time soon unless Apple does a more drastic redesign on the user interface of its home screen.""
The Internet

+ - 133 Conflict brewing for over 10% of new TLDs, ICANN reveals->

Submitted by
angry tapir
angry tapir writes "The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers has released statistics about the applications for new top-level domains — so-called 'dot word' domains along the lines of .web and .bank — ahead of the unveiling of the list of TLDs applied for that will occur today. Two hundred and thirty of the domains proposed by applicants will become the subject of ICANN's dispute resolution process — which involves an attempt among applicants for the same domain to come to a joint arrangement, followed by an auction if that's unsuccessful. There were 751 conflicting applications for domains in total, which in many cases are likely to involve generic suffixes like .secure."
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The Courts

+ - 147 Megaupload users have to pay for their data->

Submitted by
angry tapir
angry tapir writes "U.S. federal prosecutors are fine with Megaupload users recovering their data — as long as they pay for it. The government's position was explained in a court filing on Friday concerning one of the many interesting side issues that has emerged from the shutdown of Megaupload, formerly one of the most highly trafficked file-sharing sites. Prosecutors were responding to a motion filed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation in late March on behalf of Kyle Goodwin, an Ohio-based sports reporter who used Megaupload legitimately for storing videos. the government argues that it only copied part of the Megaupload data and the physical servers were never seized. Megaupload's 1,103 servers — which hold upwards of 28 petabytes of data — are still held by Carpathia Hosting. Goodwin's options, prosecutors said, are either pay — or sue — Carpathia, or sue Megaupload."
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Patents

+ - 125 Apple Yanks Toddler's Speech-Enabling App

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "'The bullies seem like the powerful people, but the secret of the real world is they're at the peak of their power at 15 and 16,' said an Apple employee in the company's 'It Gets Better' video. Unfortunately for four-year old Maya, the real world 'bullies' she faces include Apple, the world's most valuable company. TIME reports that Maya's speech-enabling 'Speak for Yourself' app was yanked from the App Store by Apple due to an unresolved patent dispute at the behest of Prentke Romich Company (PRC) and Semantic Compaction Systems (SCS), makers of designated communication devices (not iPad apps). 'My daughter cannot speak without this app,' writes Maya's Mom Dana. 'She cannot ask us questions. She cannot tell us that she's tired, or that she wants yogurt for lunch. She cannot tell her daddy that she loves him.' If you're so inclined, Dana suggests you drop a note to appstorenotices@apple.com."
Movies

+ - 192 The Expendables 2 Videogame outed by Aussies->

Submitted by dotarray
dotarray (1747900) writes "Would you play a game starring Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li, Dolph Lundgren, Chuck Norris, Randy Couture, Terry Crews, Liam Hemsworth, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Bruce Willis and Arnold Schwarzenegger? It looks like Ubisoft hopes you will, with the Australian Classification Board seemingly outing video game plans for upcoming film The Expendables 2."
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Linux

+ - 126 The rise of Linux: trust and selfishness-> 1

Submitted by
village fool
village fool writes "Hey, everybody see the BBC article, "The rise of Linux -
Why trust and selfishness helped the open source system succeed" at
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-18419231

Apparently, it is a "rare interview" in case Linus Torvalds wins the Millennium Technology Prize. Interesting take on trust, selfishness (not selflessness) and affordable failure (Raspberry Pi)"

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+ - 196 Why are hearing aids so expensive 7

Submitted by
solune
solune writes "Ipad 2 or 3: $399 or $499

Dell laptop computer: around $600

Smartphone, non-subsidized: $200 — $800+

Not to mention all the T.V’s, game consoles, etc, all around sub $1k prices... ...yet, a decent hearing aid for my mom will go upwards of $3000! WTF?

Excuse me if I sound a little pissed, but it seems to me with the shrinking electronics, better capabilities, and technological advancements, not to mention the rapidly increasing potential user base, quality hearing aids should be coming in a *lot* cheaper than what we can find.

Adding fuel to my fire is the fact, a hearing aid will greatly improve my mom’s—not to mention millions of others out there—life a lot more. Currently she suffers from frustration and isolation with having to ask people to “speak up”, and nodding her head to things her kids and grandkids say.

We’ve tried the cheapies, and they’re fraught with problems.

So, can someone tell me why a hearing aid should be so expensive?"
The Internet

+ - 206 A Digital Citizen's Bill of Rights-> 1

Submitted by matt.a.f
matt.a.f (2588933) writes "Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) has published a first-draft Internet Bill of Rights, and it's open for feedback. Given the value of taking an active approach agains prospective laws such as SOPA, PIPA, and ACTA, I think it's very important to try to spread awareness, participation, and encourage elected officials to support such things."
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Your Rights Online

+ - 156 Can you resell your smartphone or computer, federal court says no-> 1

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "The Supreme Court will soon hear a case that will affect whether you can sell your iPad — or almost anything else — without needing to get permission from a dozen "copyright holders." Here are some things you might have recently done that will be rendered illegal if the Supreme Court upholds the lower court decision:

1. Sold your first-generation iPad on Craigslist to a willing buyer, even if you bought the iPad lawfully at the Apple Store.
2. Sold your dad's used Omega watch on eBay to buy him a fancier (used or new) Rolex at a local jewelry store.
3. Sold an "import CD" of your favorite band that was only released abroad but legally purchased there. Ditto for a copy of a French or Spanish novel not released in the U.S.
4. Sold your house to a willing buyer, so long as you sell your house along with the fixtures manufactured in China, a chandelier made in Thailand or Paris, support beams produced in Canada that carry the imprint of a copyrighted logo, or a bricks or a marble countertop made in Italy with any copyrighted features or insignia.

Here is what's going on.

The Supreme Court case concerns something called the "first-sale doctrine" in copyright law. Simply put, the doctrine means that you can buy and sell the stuff you purchase. Even if someone has copyright over some piece of your stuff, you can sell it without permission from the copyright holder because the copyright holder can only control the "first-sale." The Supreme Court has recognized this doctrine since 1908.

The first-sale doctrine is one thing that makes it lawful to sell almost any good. The companies that have gone to court and sued over selling their "copyrights" include a watchmaker and shampoo producer. They have gone to court arguing that one part of the Copyright Act — which gives them a right against unauthorized imports — invalidates the first-sale doctrine.

In 1998, the Supreme Court ruled that the first-sale doctrine applies to any product manufactured in the United States, sold in the U.S., even if the first sale by the copyright holder was abroad and the item was imported back into the U.S. This decision was unanimous and rejected the interpretation preferred by the U.S. government's lawyer — and the biggest copyright holders.

The legal confusion today concerns only products made abroad.

Continuing a long string of similar cases, the Supreme Court will review a New York federal court decision that decided, in short, that the first-sale doctrine does not apply to any copyrighted product manufactured abroad. That case concerns textbooks."

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"And do you think (fop that I am) that I could be the Scarlet Pumpernickel?" -- Looney Tunes, The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950, Chuck Jones)

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