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Apple

+ - 243 Apple fined $2.5 million for false advertising->

Submitted by
Whiney Mac Fanboy
Whiney Mac Fanboy writes "Apple has agreed to pay a $2.25 million (AUD) fine (along with 300k legal costs) to the Australian Competition & Consumer Commision for misleading advertising. Apple misrepresented their iPad product as being a '4G' device, when in fact they're only compatible with a very small percentage of 4G networks around the world. The Age online has the full story."
Link to Original Source
The Military

+ - 93 Reddit users uncover potential nuclear coverup->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Earlier today, a user on Reddit claimed to have found evidence of a nuclear incident in the vicinity of Indiana or Michigan, and suspects it is being covered up by the government.

Initially I was highly skeptical, but as the day progressed, more and more evidence has surfaced indicating that there may actually be something going on. Independent radiation monitoring stations have detected high counts-per-minute values (CPM), but those data sources were changed or pulled shortly thereafter. Throughout the day, more "evidence" has appeared: many people have reported increased numbers of military aircraft, fire stations and other sources have reported high levels of radiation, and some science labs have had radiation alerts as well.

So, what's going on? Is it merely a series of coincidences being blown up by the hyperbole machine of the internet? Or is there actually something sketchy going on — and if so, what?"

Link to Original Source
Medicine

+ - 226 California City May Tax Sugary Drinks Like Cigarettes

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens writes
Hugh Pickens writes writes "Voters in Richmond, California are set to decide in November whether to make the San Francisco Bay area city the nation's first municipality to tax soda and other sugary beverages to help fight childhood obesity as the penny-per-ounce tax, projected to raise between $2 million and $8 million, would go to soccer fields, school gardens and programs to treat diabetes and fight obesity. Councilman Jeff Ritterman, a doctor who proposed the measure, says soda is a prime culprit behind high childhood obesity rates in Richmond, where nearly 20 percent of residents live below the poverty line. "If you look at where most of our added sugar is coming, it's coming from the sugar-sweetened beverages," says Rittman. "It's actually a poison for you, because your liver can't handle that huge amount of fructose." Not everyone is please by the proposed license fee on businesses selling sweetened drinks that would require owners of bodegas, theaters, convenience stores and other outlets to tally ounces sold and, presumably, pass the cost on to customers and soda taxes have failed elsewhere — most notably in Philadelphia, where Mayor Michael A. Nutter’s attempts to impose a 2-cents-per-ounce charge on sugary drinks have sputtered twice. However Dr. Bibbins-Domingo says similar taxes on cigarettes have had a dramatic affect on public health. "It was a few decades ago when we had high rates of tobacco and we had high rates of tobacco-related illnesses. Those measures really turned the tide and really led to lower rates of tobacco across the country.""
China

+ - 178 Riot at Foxconn factory-> 1

Submitted by
Presto Vivace
Presto Vivace writes "One Thousand Foxconn Workers Riot At Chinese Dormitory

A dispute of unclear origin sparked a riot at a Chinese Foxconn plant, in which as many as 1,000 workers participated. For two hours, the workers threw bottles at security and destroyed property in the plant’s dormitory area before ultimately being subdued with the help of local law enforcement.

Retribution will be swift and terrible. I can only assume that conditions in the factory must be very bad indeed."
Link to Original Source

Security

+ - 232 IPMI: Hack a server that is turned "off"->

Submitted by
UnderAttack
UnderAttack writes "A common joke in infosec is that you can't hack a server that is turned off. You better make sure that the power cord is unplugged too. Otherwise, you may be exposed via IPMI, a component present on many servers for remote management that can be used to flash firmware, get a remote console and power cycle the server even after the normal power button has been pressed to turn the server off."
Link to Original Source
Encryption

+ - 126 How many seconds would it take to crack your password? ->

Submitted by DillyTonto
DillyTonto (793644) writes "Want to know how strong your password is? Count the number of characters and the type and calculate it yourself. Steve Gibson's Interactive Brute Force Password Search Space Calculator shows the how dramatically the time-to-crack lengthens with every additional character in your password, especially if one of them is a symbol rather than a letter or number.
Worst-case scenario with almost unlimited computing power for brute-forcing the decrypt:
6 alphanumeric characters takes 0.0000224 seconds to crack
10 alpha/nums with a symbol takes 2.83 weeks."

Link to Original Source
The Courts

+ - 120 Judges know fair use when they see it on South Park->

Submitted by WindyWonka
WindyWonka (663714) writes "You'd think that that 45 million views of your own bizarre YouTube video wouldn't prompt you to sue South Park for copyright infringement. Guess again.

No matter. A federal appeals court in Chicago affirmed a lower court's decision to toss copyright claims over the infamous "What, What (in the Butt!)" video. They cited South Park‘s “distinct animation style and scatological humor," (that fancy word means "pooh") through the eyes of Cartman's 4th grade character, as a pretty damn good example of fair use."

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Security

+ - 171 Flame malware authors hit self-destruct->

Submitted by
angry tapir
angry tapir writes "The creators of the Flame cyber-espionage threat ordered infected computers still under their control to download and execute a component designed to remove all traces of the malware and prevent forensic analysis. Flame has a built-in feature called SUICIDE that can be used to uninstall the malware from infected computers. However, late last week, Flame's creators decided to distribute a different self-removal module to infected computers that connected to servers still under their control."
Link to Original Source
The Courts

+ - 211 Samsung sues Aussie patent office in Apple suit->

Submitted by schliz
schliz (994115) writes "Samsung has sued the Australian patent commissioner — and by extension the Australian Government — in an attempt to force a review of patents key to its global battle with smartphone rival Apple. The Korean manufacturer claims that the commissioner should not have been able to grant four patents used by Apple in its case against Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1. The Government solicitor will face Samsung in court on June 25."
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Education

+ - 175 Looking for recommendations for training

Submitted by
SouthSeaDragon
SouthSeaDragon writes "I'm a computer professional who has performed most of the functions that could be expected over a 39 year career, including hardware maintenance and repair, sitting on a 800 support line, developing a help desk application from the ground up (terminal-based), writing a software manual, plus developing and teaching software courses. In recent years, I've worked for computer software vendors doing pre-sales support generally for infrastructure products including applications, app servers, integration with Java based messaging and ESB product and most recently a Business Rules product. I was laid off recently due to a restructuring and am now trying to figure out the next phase. With the WIA displaced worker grants now available I am attempting to figure out what training would be good to pursue. I am hearing that "the Cloud" is the next big thing, but I'm also looking into increasing my development skills with a current language. I wonder what the readers might suggest for new directions."
Cloud

+ - 174 CentOS Backs Linux on Windows Azure With SLA->

Submitted by
MikeatWired
MikeatWired writes "OpenLogic announced on Thursday that it will provide CentOS Linux — and service-level agreement (SLA) support — through Microsoft’s new Windows Azure gallery. Yesterday, Microsoft announced support for Linux instances on its cloud service, among other cloud news, in what Wired Enterprise’s Cade Metz dubbed an Amazonian facelift. OpenLogic’s Steven Grandchamp writes in a blog post that for 'enterprise developers and IT folks who are multi-source and multi-platform, today’s announcement is good news. The Windows and Linux worlds take one step towards each other.' However, Grandchamp notes that despite Microsoft 'maturing its views on open source' with 'significant work' with Node.js, Hadoop, and Samba, the open source community 'will meet [Linux on Azure] with overall wariness and skepticism.' (See related: Windows Azure: Misunderstood or Misguided?) 'Some will view this with hope and a positive step; others will continue to be cynical,' he writes. 'For me, it’s part of a larger overall process that continues to signal open source coming of age. What major vendor doesn’t have an open source story now? It’s such an ingrained part of development, from legacy to mobile to cloud, that we can’t live without and we are figuring out how to love living with it.'"
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Earth

+ - 228 Huge phytoplankton bloom found under Arctic ice->

Submitted by ananyo
ananyo (2519492) writes "Researchers have been shocked to find a record-breaking phytoplankton bloom hidden under Arctic ice. The finding is a big surprise — few scientists thought blooms of this size could grow in Arctic waters. The finding implies that the Arctic is much more productive than previously thought — researchers now think some 25% of the Arctic Ocean has conditions conducive to such blooms (abstract). The discovery also helps to explain why Arctic waters have proven such a good carbon dioxide sink."
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The Military

+ - 128 Trained Rats Map Minefields Automatically->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Believe it or not, but the Department of Defense is paying psychologists to train rats to find mines and circle around them. By attaching little GPS backpacks and supplying a laptop with software that looks for the 'circling around' signature, the DOD hopes its project will allow the release of platoons of rats near suspected minefields so that the laptop software creates a detailed map of where all the mines are located automatically. Not sure if they plan on picking up the rats afterward, but they do assure us that the rats are too lightweight to set off the mines!""
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Politics

+ - 228 The Art of Elections Forecasting->

Submitted by
ideonexus
ideonexus writes "Years ago Nate Silver of FiveThirtyEight.com, a blog seeking to educate the public about elections forecasting, established his model as one of the most accurate in existence, rising from a fairly unknown statistician working in baseball to one of the most respected names in election forecasting. In this article he describes all the factors that go into his predictions. A fascinating overview of the process of modeling a chaotic system."
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The Internet

+ - 109 DARPA wants electronics with radically novel liquid cooling technology ->

Submitted by
coondoggie
coondoggie writes "With increased electronic minituriztion and the density of the chips running such devices heat is a mortal enemy for the power and scalability of such systems. DARPA today announced a program called Intrachip/Interchip Enhanced Cooling (ICECool) that it hopes will go the heart of such heat problems by building chips with a drastically different way of cooling that uses what the agency calls a microfluid channel inside the chip or component that will more effectively dissipate heat than current cooling technologies."
Link to Original Source
Robotics

+ - 224 Linux for Navy Drone Ground Stations->

Submitted by
garymortimer
garymortimer writes "Raytheon will help the U.S. Navy transition to using Linux software at ground control stations for unmanned air vehicles, the Defense Department announced Wednesday.

The company’s intelligence and information systems unit won a $27,883,883 contract to implement the tactical control system software, used for directing vertical take-off UAVs."

Link to Original Source
Earth

+ - 161 Earth Approaching Tipping Point say Scientists

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens writes
Hugh Pickens writes writes "The UC Berkeley News Center reports that a prestigious group of 22 internationally known scientists from around the world is warning that population growth, widespread destruction of natural ecosystems, and climate change may be driving Earth toward an irreversible change in the biosphere, a planet-wide tipping point that would have destructive consequences absent adequate preparation and mitigation. “It really will be a new world, biologically, at that point,” warns lead author Anthony Barnosky. “The data suggests that there will be a reduction in biodiversity and severe impacts on much of what we depend on to sustain our quality of life, including, for example, fisheries, agriculture, forest products and clean water. This could happen within just a few generations." The authors note that studies of small-scale ecosystems show that once 50-90 percent of an area has been altered, the entire ecosystem tips irreversibly into a state far different from the original, in terms of the mix of plant and animal species and their interactions. Humans have already converted about 43 percent of the ice-free land surface of the planet to uses like raising crops and livestock and building cities. This situation typically is accompanied by species extinctions and a loss of biodiversity. “My view is that humanity is at a crossroads now, where we have to make an active choice,” says Barnosky. “One choice is to acknowledge these issues and potential consequences and try to guide the future (in a way we want to). The other choice is just to throw up our hands and say, ‘Let’s just go on as usual and see what happens.’"
Graphics

+ - 108 Zero Power Displays: Solution Searching for a Problem->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "E Ink--makers of the zero stand-by power electrophoretic displays used in the first Kindles--thought they were home free, ready to retire on the millions of units being shipped for eReaders. Unfortunately for them, the iPad came along and now every eReader is switching to backlit LCDs despite the fact that you have to charge their batteries daily instead of weekly like when using a E Ink display. The company's new owners--Taiwan's YFY Group--however is landing contracts for a wide variety of applications where zero standby power is still a big advantage, like smartcards and like turning the black back of an iPhone into an auxiliary display that tells you the time, how many waiting emails and messages you have, and remaining battery life all without having to power up the main LCD display. These and a bunch of other new designs are on display at this week's Society of Information Displays (SID 2012, Boston), but you can see them online here."
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Books

+ - 109 Journal: History books can be fun (but usually aren't and this is a Bad Thing) 2

Journal by jd

Most people have read "1066 and all that: a memorable history of England, comprising all the parts you can remember, including 103 good things, 5 bad kings and 2 genuine dates" (one of the longest book titles I have ever encountered) and some may have encountered "The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody", but these are the exceptions and not the rule. What interesting - but accurateish - takes on history have other Slashdotters encountered?

+ - 178 IPv6 is STILL Like Brocolli. Though 20 MIllion Facebook Users are on it now->

Submitted by darthcamaro
darthcamaro (735685) writes "So how did World IPv6 Launch go? Surprisingly well according to a participants at the event. Google said that it has seen a 150% growth in IPv6 traffic, Facebook now has 27 million IPv6 users and Akamai is serving 100x more IPv6 traffic.
But it's still a 'brocolli' technology

I've said in the past that IPv6 is a 'brocolli' technology," Leslie Daigle, CTO of the Internet Society said. "I still think it is a tech everybody knows it would be good if we ate more of it but nobody wants to eat it without the cheese sauce."

"

Link to Original Source

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