Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot stories can be listened to in audio form via an RSS feed, as read by our own robotic overlord.

+ - 108 Global Warming Scientist Slamdown->

Submitted by phantomfive
phantomfive (622387) writes "Earlier 16 scientists said anthropogenic global warming is not something to worry about. This generated some rebuttals, "Do you consult your dentist about your heart condition? In science, as in any area, reputations are based on knowledge and expertise in a field and on published, peer-reviewed work."
Now the 16 are hitting back. "We urge readers not to depend on pompous academy pronouncements—on what we say....everyone should look at certain stubborn facts that don't fit the theory espoused in the Trenberth letter.""

Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - 173 Anonymous Cowards, Deanonymized-> 1

Submitted by mbstone
mbstone (457308) writes "Arvind Narayanan writes: What if authors can be identified based on nothing but a comparison of the content they publish to other web content they have previously authored? Naryanan has a new paper to be presented at the 33rd IEEE Symposium on Security & Privacy. Just as individual telegraphers could be identified by other telegraphers from their "fists," Naryanan posits that an author's habitual choices of words, such as, for example, the frequency with which the author uses "since" as opposed to "because," can be processed through an algorithm to identify the author's writing. Fortunately, and for now, manually altering one's writing style is effective as a countermeasure."
Link to Original Source
Facebook

+ - 188 Facebook Also Bypasses Privacy Settings In IE

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Following the news that Google is tricking Apple’s Safari browser by including privacy-circumventing code in its ads, Microsoft is now saying that Google bypassed privacy settings in Internet Explorer as well. The story goes deeper than that. Google isn’t the only one bypassing Microsoft Internet Explorer’s privacy settings: Facebook does it too, as do thousands of other companies."

+ - 125 Kinect reverse parking->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes ""A reverse parking system which utilizes the kinect depth image to generate a birds eye view of the surroundings behind the vehicle. The parking assist can switch between color camera mode, infra red camera mode, and reverse parking assist mode. Future plans include using an android phone to display camera information to the user,""
Link to Original Source

+ - 193 Hunters Shoot Down Drone of Animal Rights Group->

Submitted by Required Snark
Required Snark (1702878) writes "A remote control drone operated by an animal rights group was shot down in South Carolina by a group of thwarted hunters.
Steve Hindi, the group president said "his group was preparing to launch its Mikrokopter drone to video what he called a live pigeon shoot on Sunday when law enforcement officers and an attorney claiming to represent the privately-owned plantation near Ehrhardt tried to stop the aircraft from flying." After the shoot was halted, the drone was launched anyway, and at this point it was shot down. "Seconds after it hit the air, numerous shots rang out," Hindi said in the release. "As an act of revenge for us shutting down the pigeon slaughter, they had shot down our copter." "It is important to note how dangerous this was, as they were shooting toward and into a well-travelled highway," Hindi stated in the release."

Link to Original Source
Patents

+ - 210 European Parliament to exclude free software with FRAND

Submitted by jan.van.gent
jan.van.gent (2578677) writes "The European Parliament is on the verge to adopt a directive about reform of standards, reform which would introduce FRAND patent licensing terms (fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory), an undefined term which has been a direct attack on the fundamental principles of Free and Open source software. The Business Software Alliance (BSA) has been very active before the European Commission proposed the text on trying to get FRAND terms inside the text."
Biotech

+ - 174 Russian Scientists Revive Plant From 30,000-Year-Old Seeds->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "It was an Ice Age squirrel’s treasure chamber, a burrow containing fruit and seeds that had been stuck in the Siberian permafrost for over 30,000 years. From the fruit tissues, a team of Russian scientists managed to resurrect an entire plant in a pioneering experiment that paves the way for the revival of other species. The Silene stenophylla is the oldest plant ever to be regenerated, the researchers said, and it is fertile, producing white flowers and viable seeds. ... 'The squirrels dug the frozen ground to build their burrows, which are about the size of a soccer ball, putting in hay first and then animal fur for a perfect storage chamber,' said Stanislav Gubin, one of the authors of the study, who spent years rummaging through the area for squirrel burrows. 'It’s a natural cryobank.'"
Link to Original Source

+ - 109 Are drones silently soaring over Iran->

Submitted by
garymortimer
garymortimer writes "Long range, low level, silent, stealthy, persistent, and hand launched: certainly useful attributes in a drone. No doubt many platforms are busy in the skies in and around Iran at the moment. Could some of them be pretending to be and flying like birds?

Back in August 2011 a bird shaped drone crash landed at Chaman, Pakistan just over the border from Afghanistan. Electrically powered and with what were reported as two cameras on board.Witnesses in Chaman said that the aircraft was in the air from at least17h00 and remained circling for two hours coming down at around 19h00.

Perhaps it was limping home from points unknown and loitered waiting for friendlies to come closer and retrieve it."

Link to Original Source
Crime

+ - 213 The Pirate Bay: Banned in the UK?->

Submitted by
redletterdave
redletterdave writes "Swedish filesharing website The Pirate Bay may soon be blocked in the UK after a London judge ruled that the site breaches copyright laws on a large scale, and that both the platform and its users illegally share copyrighted material like movies and music. In addition to finding legal fault with The Pirate Bay and its users, the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) also wants all British Internet service providers (ISPs) to block access to The Pirate Bay in the UK."
Link to Original Source
Open Source

+ - 145 Hackers In Space: Hackerspace Global Grid Interview->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "At the Chaos Communication Camp 2011 Jens Ohlig, Lars Weiler, and Nick Farr proposed a daunting task: to land a hacker on the Moon by 2034. The plan calls for three separate phases:

Establishing an open, free, and globally accessible satellite communication network
Put a human into orbit
Land on the Moon
Interestingly enough, there is already considerable work being done on the second phase of this plan by the Copenhagen Suborbitals, and Google’s own Lunar X Prize is trying to spur development of robotic missions to the Moon. But what about the first phase? Answering the call is the “shackspace”, a hackerspace from Stuttgart, Germany, who’ve begun work on an ambitious project they’re calling the “Hackerspace Global Grid“.

We recently caught up with one of the core team members, hadez, who took some time to talk with us a bit about the current state of the project and what we should expect going forward."

Link to Original Source
Hardware

+ - 177 MinION $900 USB-Powered DNA Sequencer on Sale This Year->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "Oxford Nanopore (ON) has been developing a disruptive nanopore-based technology for sequencing DNA, RNA, proteins, and other long-chain molecules since its birth in 2005. The company has just announced that within the next 6-9 months it will bring to market a fast, portable, and disposable protein sequencer that will democratize sequencing by eliminating large capital costs associated with equipment required to enter the field."
Link to Original Source
Android

+ - 116 LOIC DDoS Attack Tool Goes Mobile to Android->

Submitted by wiredmikey
wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks have become a favorite weapon of hacktivists in the past several years, and especially recently. But while such attacks are typically launched from an army of PCs, researchers have found a new app for Android that ports the infamous low orbit ion cannon (LOIC) tool over to mobile devices.

Besides the new Android version LOIC, the tool has also been ported to JavaScript to perform a denial-of-service directly from the browser. Porting the tool over to Android was made easy by the fact that it was generated using a free online service that creates Android apps with just a URL, HTML code or document file, said security researcher Carlos Castillo."

Link to Original Source
Data Storage

+ - 101 Current solid-state drive technology is doomed, says MS->

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "Flash storage has its advantages, such as packing a lot of capacity in a smaller footprint than the traditional hard drive, and the ability to access that data quickly. That’s not going to last, say researchers with the University of California, San Diego and Microsoft Research: 2024 will be the year of reckoning for flash and solid-state drive technology. Using current chips as a basis, researchers set out to gauge the state of flash technology [PDF] overall. They found that latency and data errors increased as drive size increased. These issues worsened to the point of making the drive too unstable somewhere around 16TB, which the researchers say we will reach sometime in the middle of the next decade."
Link to Original Source
Cloud

+ - 186 Is it time for NoSQL 2.0? 1

Submitted by rescrv
rescrv (2575031) writes "Key-value stores (like Cassandra, Redis and DynamoDB) have been replacing traditional databases in many demanding web applications (e.g. Twitter, Google, Facebook, LinkedIn and others). But for the most part, the differences between existing NoSQL systems come down to the choice of well-studied implementation techniques; in particular, they all provide a similar API that achieves high performance and scalability by limiting applications to simple operations like GET and PUT. HyperDex, a new key-value store developed at Cornell, stands out in the NoSQL spectrum with its unique design. HyperDex employs a unique multi-dimensional hash function to enable efficient search operations — that is, objects may be retrieved without using the key under which they are stored. Other systems employ indexing techniques to enable search, or enumerate all objects in the system. In contrast, HyperDex's design enables applications to retrieve search results directly from servers in the system. The results are impressive. Preliminary benchmark results on the project website show that HyperDex provides significant performance improvements over Cassandra and MongoDB. With its unique design, and impressive performance, it seems fittng to ask: Is HyperDex the start of NoSQL 2.0?"

+ - 173 Best language for experimental GUI demo projects 1

Submitted by
GrantRobertson
GrantRobertson writes "I am not a professional software developer and never have any aspirations to become one. I've been through a generic university computer science degree-program and I can tolerate C++ begrudgingly. I do OK with Java and prefer it, though I still have to look up every API before I use it. Most of the code I want to write will be not much more than prototypes or proof of concept stuff for the research I will be doing, rather than full-on applications ready for distribution and use. I can learn any language out there, if need be, but these days it is more about the ecosystem than the core language. IDEs, libraries, cross-platform compatibility, user support, open source licensing.

My research/tinkering will be along two main lines:
1) Devising entirely new graphical user interface elements, mostly in 2-D, though often in a true or simulated 3-D space. I am working on ways to visualize, navigate, and manipulate very, VERY large data-sets of academic research information.
2) Computer based education software, though of a type never seen before. This will combine some of the GUI elements invented in (1) as well as displaying standard HTML or HTML5 content via a browser engine.

My requirements are:
A) A decent IDE ecosystem.
B) A decent set of libraries, but ones that don't lock me in to a particular mind-set like Swing does in Java. (Boxes in boxes in boxes, Oh My!)
C) An ability to easily draw what I want, where I want and make any surface of that 3-D object become a source for capturing events.
D) Ease of cross-platform use. (So others can easily look at my examples and run with them.)
E) No impediments to open-source licensing my code or for others to go commercial with it either (as I have seen when I looked into Qt).

So, should I just stick with Java and start looking outside the box for GUI toolkits? Or is there something else out there I should be looking at?"

+ - 184 Adobe employee speaks out on bloatware->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "This controversial post by Adobe's Kas Thomas asks if splash screens are just a sign of program bloat and callous disregard for users. It suggests that big programs should launch instantly (or appear to), perhaps by running against an instance in the cloud while the local instance finishes loading. Users of cell phones and tablets are accustomed to apps being instantly available. This is the new standard for performance, the author argues. Nothing short of it will do, any more."
Link to Original Source
Open Source

+ - 94 LibreOffice is the triumph of maturity over adversity->

Submitted by superapecommando
superapecommando (1667063) writes "Simon Phipps, former head of open source at Sun, points out how the story of LibreOffice is a great example of how open source communities can triumph over adversity.

"While much of what has happened has been the steady momentum you'd expect from a community-run project, the announcement this morning that parent organisation The Document Foundation has finally been officially incorporated in Germany seems a symbolic maturity point for the once-renegade project. Incorporation was made possible by the amazing week in 2011 when hundreds of individual donations provided the €50,000 starting capital for the Foundation, and while it's taken a year to happen, the entity that's been created — a German Stiftung — is as solid as rock. ""

Link to Original Source

Overdrawn? But I still have checks left!

Working...