Comment: Re:TCO (Score 2) 158

by Rutulian (#47555067) Attached to: Valencia Linux School Distro Saves 36 Million Euro

(though Linux does have non-stock application deployment packages available, like Puppet, that partially fill that last point).

You're kidding right? In addition to Puppet, which is a relative newcomer, there has been Satellite (http://www.redhat.com/products/enterprise-linux/satellite/) and Landscape (http://www.ubuntu.com/management/landscape-features) among others (Suse has one too). Where do you think the distros make their money? Now you may have meant there is no free application deployment and management software, but last time I checked Windows Server was definitely not free. If you need free, though, you can roll some scripts fairly easily, wrapping things like Kickstart with custom repositories (yum or apt) and services like Cobbler or Spacewalk (which Satellite is based off of), rsync, cron jobs, and ssh (for remote execution).

Linux AD-via-Samba quite simply doesn't even come close for the convenience of centralized GP maintenance,

I don't know what you are trying to say here. Why would you manage linux machines with a Samba domain? If you want the same functionality as AD on linux, FreeIPA is the most mature project, and it can integrate with AD via cross-realm trusts in the latest version. So you can manage a mixed Windows/Linux environment with the same core infrastructure. If instead you meant Samba as an AD domain controller for Windows, Samba4 is (mostly, 95%) a drop-in replacement for Windows Server. There are a few features missing, but you can provision and manage an AD domain via Samba with ease.

+ - Wedding dance instruction->

Submitted by susankelly693
susankelly693 writes: Wedding dance instruction is an dance training school which help to learn dance moves with our dance professional. There is also a connection to the music and it’s roots that can create the earthly, grounded look and feel.so why are you waiting just come and learn different moves.
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Sorry to tell you... (Score 1) 544

I am pretty sure the market still exist. It is just much smaller. A changed phone a couple month ago because my previous phone (with slide out keyboard) died on me. I search for a replacement and could not find one. But when asking at my local store the girl told me I was the second guy looking for one with week.

Making a phone with an hardware keyboard would certainly be much more expensive now than it was before (relatively to current phone market prices). Now the question is how much more expensive ? And do people that want a slide out keyboard REALLY want one.

Comment: Re:I know you're trying to be funny, but... (Score 1) 739

by mike4ty4 (#47555057) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

I thought "political correctness" was about avoiding things like racism or other types of prejudice (e.g. avoiding talking about black people as being inferior or something). That's a very good thing, IMO. I didn't think it was about saying that every opinion is equally valid, which is a logical impossibility as they all contradict each other.

(And not all compilers are equally bug-free.)

Comment: That's modern capitalism (Score 1) 544

It doesn't matter what the consumer wants. What matters is what operators and manufacturers want. There is no way manufacturers are going to get feedback from consumers on such complex things. All they get is sales numbers, but they have no idea why a certain product sells or not. That's why Blackberry added colour touch screens since they don't understand what the potential of their product is. They see Apple being successful with touchscreen phones and so also try touchscreen phones.

Of course you can always use the democratic aspect of capitalism and just buy a mobile phone company, and make them build whatever device you want.

Comment: Re:"Are you doing this just to waste. . ." (Score 1) 24

by damn_registrars (#47555051) Attached to: niwdoG
This whole "moral superiority" bullshit that you are now swinging about is just as silly as most of the other memes you have been parroting from the conservative blogosphere. I never once claimed to have any such superiority over you; why would I even want to talk to you if I held that as a belief? I am indisputably better educated on several of the topics that you keep attempting to lecture on, and I point out where the gaps in your knowledge are on those topics (sometimes the gaps being so large that it is hard to tell if any knowledge exists at all, but that is another problem).

But being knowledgeable is not related to having "moral superiority". Truth and morality are orthogonal dimensions, just as socialism and fascism are orthogonal political ideas.

Comment: What about blowup blisterkeys for touchphones? (Score 0) 544

Technology is always advancing, and one of the things that's being worked on is buttons on touchphones that physically exist, but only when you need them. The first iterations will probably be dedicated buttons(still capable of being transient) for, wait for it, QWERTY keyboard setups. Later on, you'll probably be able to customize it to different games and needs, maybe something that lets you navigate tv shows by touch so you don't have to squint or turn on a light. I know some remotes kinda work like that, but a customized version would be spectacular.

Researchers know the problem exists, their solutions just aren't profitable yet.

Comment: Re:... Exclusion?! (Score 1) 544

Who said anything about drinking from a cup? Not every convenience store has a fountain, and even if they do the performance is inconsistent. Vending machines are definitely not fountains. There's no "cup" a lot of times.

There were many times in my Coke-drinking days when I'd partially empty a 20 oz. I just hated wasting the stuff; but I knew I didn't want to drink all of it. It always went flat before I wanted any more.

BTW, the Mexican cokes are still a bit too big. 12 oz. (355 ml) or half-liter. I find 12 oz., poured over ice and shared with somebody is best; although I can tolerate 12 oz. The half-liter is a disturbing trend. The Mexicans certainly don't need it, since they just surpassed the US in obesity.

BTW, I knew the original coke bottle was smaller and found this article about 6.5 oz. bottles.. Sigh... apparently this was available in the UK not that long ago? Maybe they'll bring it back to the US and finally reverse the trend. The original size was just about right. Yes, I'd pay more per oz., but I'd pay the same per *serving*.

Can the Coke executives get that through their heads? Some of us are desiring a *serving*, not a "most ounces for the buck". Wondering what to do with the excess soda, or being suckered into finishing more than you need... is not a pleasant experience. Having a right-sized glass bottle with real sugar in it, that's what some of us want.

+ - W.A. Commercial Appliances->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: You can buy a wide assortment of Commercial Kitchen Equipment in Perth from W.A Commercial Appliances. Apart from this, they provide professionally managed and prompt Commercial Equipment Repairs service in Wa. Their charges are quite reasonable that suit your demand for sure.

Address:100 Roberts Road, Kelmscott, WA 6111
Phone:0421 505 958

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Flash panic (Score 2) 161

by pipedwho (#47555043) Attached to: OKCupid Experiments on Users Too

The problem with most 'commercial experimentation' is that it isn't about getting better value for the consumer, but about how to to best convince the consumer to pay more for something, or buy something, that they otherwise would not have.

Loyalty cards are a way for a business to encourage a customer to return whether or not it is really in their best interest. Phone contracts, transaction 'fees' and 'licensing' are other ways to get people coming back for more of a beating. If you make the fine print and pricing structure too complicated to understand, while offering all sorts of shiny bling in the big print, marketers have found that they can significantly increase sales. Auto bank account debits are great in that the consumer starts to forget that they are continually paying for something, and may take a few extra months (and therefore payments) to cancel a service that they are no longer using - especially when you make it difficult to do.

Factory rebates are another example of sneaky marketing. They make it hard to claim the rebate, in some cases always 'losing' your first application, or finding something incorrect or incomplete in their overly complicated request form. In the end they pay out less than 1 in 5 rebates because most people give up trying to claim that $100. However, when buying the product the consumer factored in the rebate and probably avoided a more suitable competitor with a better more 'expensive' product.

All these techniques would have been arrived at by experimenting on consumers. It is simply about a business trying to get as close to the threshold of pain as possible to maximise profit. Too far and they go backwards - which is why they experiment on a small sample of their market before any large scale roll out.