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+ - 181 oVirt 3.4 Released Finally Enabling Management and VMs on the Same Machine->

Submitted by darthcamaro
darthcamaro (735685) writes "Red Hat's open source oVirt project hit a major milestone this week with the release of version 3.4. It's got improved storage handling so users can mix and match different resource types, though the big new feature is one that seems painfully obvious. For the first time oVirt users can have the oVirt Manager and oVirt VMs on the same physical machine.

"So, typically, customers deployed the oVirt engine on a physical machine or on a virtual machine that wasn't managed or monitored," Scott Herold, principal product manager for Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization said. "The oVirt 3.4 release adds the ability for oVirt to self-host its engine, including monitoring and recovery of the virtual machine." -

"

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+ - 164 Judge OKs Class Action Suit Against Apple for E-book Price Fixing

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Reuters reports: 'A federal judge in New York granted class certification on Friday to a group of consumers who sued Apple Inc for conspiring with five major publishers to fix e-book prices in violation of antitrust law....The plaintiffs are seeking more than $800 million in damages.' The trial will probably be in July or September. The judge who granted class certification, Denise Cote, ruled in 2013 that Apple was guilty of colluding with other publishers to raise the price of e-books and to force Amazon.com to do the same."

+ - 109 Astronomers claim dark matter found

Submitted by wbr1
wbr1 (2538558) writes ""A team of astronomers led by Tansu Daylan (Harvard University), claims that excessive gamma-rays deteceted from the center of the galaxy by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope are not from pulsars, but dark matter. More specifically, if the theory that dark matter is made up of massive particles and anti-particles, their collision should produce gamma-ray burst signatures similar to those seen.

"If our interpretation is correct, this signal would constitute the discovery of an entirely new particle that makes up the majority of the mass found in the universe," says coauthor Dan Hooper (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory). "I can't find words that are strong enough to capture the significance of such a discovery."

But others remain skeptical. " 'Extraordinary claims need extraordinary evidence,' as we said about the B-mode signal recently," says expert Kevork Abazajian (University of California, Irvine), referring to the discovery of inflation's fingerprint on the cosmic microwave background announced last week.
Article: http://www.skyandtelescope.com... ewsblog/Have-we-Spotted-Dark-Matter-in-the-Milky-Way-251964551.html
Paper on arxiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:140...""

+ - 117 "Piracy is stealing! Piracy is killing the ___ industry!"->

Submitted by hessian
hessian (467078) writes "I asked him how one went about trading software. He looked at me like total noob but he smiled anyway. “See those lists.” he said pointing to 8 foot tall listings of fan-folded paper hanging ceiling to floor behind most of the computers. “Just look down the list, find the disk number, go to the box and take the disk. Then copy it and put it back.”"
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+ - 204 Toward Better Programming->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Chris Granger, creator of the flexible, open source LightTable IDE, has written a thoughtful article about the nature of programming. For years, he's been trying to answer the question: What's wrong with programming? After working on his own IDE and discussing it with hundreds of other developers, here are his thoughts: 'If you look at much of the advances that have made it to the mainstream over the past 50 years, it turns out they largely increased our efficiency without really changing the act of programming. I think the reason why is something I hinted at in the very beginning of this post: it's all been reactionary and as a result we tend to only apply tactical fixes. As a matter of fact, almost every step we've taken fits cleanly into one of these buckets. We've made things better but we keep reaching local maxima because we assume that these things can somehow be addressed independently. ... The other day, I came to the conclusion that the act of writing software is actually antagonistic all on its own. Arcane languages, cryptic errors, mostly missing (or at best, scattered) documentation — it's like someone is deliberately trying to screw with you, sitting in some Truman Show-like control room pointing and laughing behind the scenes. At some level, it's masochistic, but we do it because it gives us an incredible opportunity to shape our world.'"
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+ - 163 Australia's Dingo May be Its Own Species-> 1

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "For centuries, scientists have debated whether Australia’s native canine, the dingo, is its own species or merely a type of wolf or dog. Now, based on physical and genetic evidence, a team of scientists is making the case that the dingo is a unique species that deserves protection under Australia’s federal conservation laws. If they can’t convince governments and landholders, the dingo may be doomed."
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+ - 135 Microsoft Promises Not To Snoop Through Email-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft took some much-deserved flack last week for admitting they examined the emails of a Hotmail user who received some leaked Windows 8 code. The company defended their actions at the time. Now, after hearing the backlash, Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith says they will not do so in the future. Instead, they'll refer it to law enforcement. He wrote, 'It’s always uncomfortable to listen to criticism. But if one can step back a bit, it’s often thought-provoking and even helpful. That was definitely the case for us over the past week. Although our terms of service, like those of others in our industry, allowed us to access lawfully the account in this case, the circumstances raised legitimate questions about the privacy interests of our customers. ...As a company we've participated actively in the public discussions about the proper balance between the privacy rights of citizens and the powers of government. We've advocated that governments should rely on formal legal processes and the rule of law for surveillance activities. While our own search was clearly within our legal rights, it seems apparent that we should apply a similar principle and rely on formal legal processes for our own investigations involving people who we suspect are stealing from us.'"
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+ - 136 Michael Abrash Joins Oculus, Calls Facebook "Final Piece of the Puzzle"-> 1

Submitted by trawg
trawg (308495) writes "Programming legend Michael Abrash has announced that he has joined the Oculus team to work on the Rift VR headset as Chief Scientist, and will be once again working with John Carmack to bring VR to life. His post covers a lot of ground, including the history of his quest for VR, and ends with his explanation of why he thinks the Facebook acquisition is ultimately a good thing — they have the engineering, resources and long-term commitment "to solve the hard problems of VR"."
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+ - 205 FTC Settles with Sites over SSL Lies->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The makers of two major mobile apps, Fandango and Credit Karma, have settled with the Federal Trade Commission after the commission charged that they deliberately misrepresented the security of their apps and failed to validate SSL certificates. The apps promised users that their data was being sent over secure SSL connections, but the apps had disabled the validation process.

The settlements with the FTC don’t include any monetary penalties, but both companies have been ordered to submit to independent security audits every other year for the next 20 years and to put together comprehensive security programs."

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+ - 93 Turkey now looking to ban YouTube Again->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Turkey’s telecoms authority has taken an ‘administrative measure’ against YouTube because of an audio leak that contains Turkish Officials discussing Syria.

I want to try and explain something, the internet isn’t just a hole you can plug and be done with this just creates even more holes and eventually you run out of appendages to block these holes and you just end up looking like a bit of a fool.

In this audio recording Turkish officials were discussing the possibility of military operations in Syria:"

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+ - 212 Ferrari Fan page creator ousted by Ferrari, Kid Sues->

Submitted by ganjadude
ganjadude (952775) writes "Sammy Wassem started the Facebook fan page for Ferrari when he was 15 and eventually grew it to over 500,000 followers. In 2009, the company congratulated him on the site's success, but said that "legal issues" forced it to take over the administration, according to Automotive News Europe. Wassem could still use the site, but managers had oversight.

Wassem asked Ferrari for financial compensation to keep working on the page but continued creating content on it for the next four years. Eventually, the company terminated his administration rights. In 2013 he and his father Olivier filed the lawsuit against the business alleging it owes payment over 5,500 hours of work and copyright infringement for taking over the page. They are asking for 10 million Swiss francs ($11.3 million)."

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+ - 102 State-Sponsored Hacking Attacks Targeting Top News Organizations->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Security engineers from Google have found that 21 out of the top 25 news organizations have been targeted by cyberattacks that are likely state-sponsored. We've heard about some high profile attacks on news sites, but Google actively tracks the countries that are launching these attacks, and even hosts email services for many of the news organizations. 'Huntley said Chinese hackers recently gained access to a major Western news organization, which he declined to identify, via a fake questionnaire emailed to staff. Most such attacks involve carefully crafted emails carrying malware or directing users to a website crafted to trick them into giving up credentials. Marquis-Boire said that while such attacks were nothing new, their research showed that the number of attacks on media organizations and journalists that went unreported was significantly higher than those made public.'"
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+ - 124 Ford's Virtual Reality Gives Engineers X-Ray Vision, Aids Design

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy (2660665) writes "Facebook bought OculusVR and the world tilted a little on its axis. But good old Ford has been using VR all along without much fanfare. VR tech effectively gives Ford engineers X-ray vision, so they can — virtually — see through a vehicle's structure, which helps to design mechanical hardware, and spot issues with designs that might interfere with vehicle "hard points." Ford's engineers also use VR headsets to check out exterior and interior designs of cars that don't exist in the physical world — at least not yet. Team members walk around virtual cars to preview designs, or "get in" to check if interior layouts will work in the real world."

+ - 118 One Person Successfully Removed From U.S. No-Fly List->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "In February, Judge William Alsup ruled in favor of Rahinah Ibrahim who sued the U.S. government in 2006 after she was mistakenly added to the no-fly list. Now, the Department of Justice has finally decided it won't appeal the ruling, making Ibrahim the first person to go to trial and get herself removed from the list. 'But Ibrahim's case, as just one of hundreds of thousands of individuals who have been placed on such lists, shows the system's opacity. First, the only surefire way to even determine if one is on such a list in the U.S. is to attempt to board a flight and be denied. Even after that happens, when a denied person inquires about his or her status, the likely response will be that the government “can neither confirm nor deny” the placement on such lists. The government's surrender in Ibrahim comes on the heels of a new report by the American Civil Liberties Union that shows just how insanely difficult it is to contest one's status on the government blacklists (PDF).'"
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+ - 129 The Language of the Future is French,say the French-> 1

Submitted by Painted
Painted (1343347) writes "By carefully cherry picking their data, the Observatory of the French Language is convinced that eventually, somehow, French is going to become the world's dominant language. Because of Africa, of all things.

This will certainly put a damper on my bugging the francophones I know by asking them what the Lingua Franca is..."

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+ - 204 Technocrat James Schlesinger Is Dead at 85->

Submitted by mdsolar
mdsolar (1045926) writes "James Schlesinger who served as Secretary of Defense under Presidents Nixon and Ford and as the first Secretary of Energy under President Carter passed away on Thursday in Baltimore at the age of 85. Schlesinger is perhaps the most technocratic person to reach such high office. He had a keen awareness of the connection between energy supply and national defense and as Administrator of the Economic Regulatory Administration, brought our Standby Gasoline Rationing Plan into existence. http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/12000/1... The existence of such a plan along with our Strategic Petroleum Reserve, which Schlesinger also brought into being, have been a bulwark against further oil embargoes and essentially broke OPEC for a period of more than a decade. The NYT has an obituary that covers more of his career."
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+ - 114 CISPA's Author Has Another Privacy-Killing Bill to Pass Before He Retires ->

Submitted by Daniel_Stuckey
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "You might remember House Intelligence Chair Mike Rogers, a Republican from Michigan, from his lovely, universally-hated (by 14-year-olds, at least) CISPA cybersecurity bill that would have allowed nearly seamless information sharing between companies and the federal government. You might also remember him from his c’est la vie attitude towards civil liberties in general.

Well, we’ve got some good news and some bad news: Rogers announced today that he won’t seek re-election and is instead retiring from politics to start a conservative talk radio show on Cumulus. The bad news? He’s got at least one terrible, civil liberties-killing bill to try to push through Congress before he goes.

Like CISPA, the newly introduced “FISA Transparency and Modernization Act,” seeks to make it easier for the federal government to get your information from companies."

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+ - 107 Synthetic Chromosomes Sucessfully Integrated in Brewer's Yeast->

Submitted by dunnomattic
dunnomattic (2590531) writes "Researchers at New York University School of Medicine have achieved a milestone in synthetic biology. A fully synthetic yeast chromosome, dubbed 'synIII', has successfully replaced chromosome 3 of multiple living yeast cells. The researchers pieced together over 250,000 nucleotide bases to accomplish this feat. Dr. Jef Boeke, the lead author of the study, says "not only can we make designer changes on a computer, but we can make hundreds of changes through a chromosome and we can put that chromosome into yeast and have a yeast that looks, smells and behaves like a regular yeast, but this yeast is endowed with special properties that normal yeasts don't have."

Work is underway to synthesize the remaining 15 chromosomes."

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+ - 163 Classified X-37B Space Plane Breaks Space Longevity Record->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "A little-known U.S. space plane quietly broke its own space endurance record this week as its current unmanned mission surpassed 469 days in space. What it was doing up there for so long is a secret closely held by the Air Force, but Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and an authority on satellites and launches, thinks it's serving a similar role as the space shuttle by carrying a science or intelligence payload. 'I believe it's testing some kind of experimental sensor for the National Reconnaissance Office; for example, a hyperspectral imager, or some new kind of signals intelligence package,' said McDowell. 'The sensor was more successful than expected, so the payload customer asked the X-37 folks to keep the spacecraft in orbit longer.'"
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+ - 124 Tesla Adds Titanium Underbody Shield and Aluminum Deflector Plates to Model S &#->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Tesla Motors made headlines several times last year for a few high-profile car fires in their Model S. Elon Musk criticized all the attention at the time, pointing out that it was disproportionate to the 200,000 fire in gas-powered cars over the same period. Musk didn't stop there, though. He's now announced that the Model S will now have a titanium underbody shield along with an aluminum bar and extrusion. He says this will prevent debris struck on the road from breaching the battery area. Musk offered this amusing example: 'We believe these changes will also help prevent a fire resulting from an extremely high speed impact that tears the wheels off the car, like the other Model S impact fire, which occurred last year in Mexico. This happened after the vehicle impacted a roundabout at 110 mph, shearing off 15 feet of concrete curbwall and tearing off the left front wheel, then smashing through an eight foot tall buttressed concrete wall on the other side of the road and tearing off the right front wheel, before crashing into a tree. The driver stepped out and walked away with no permanent injuries and a fire, again limited to the front section of the vehicle, started several minutes later. The underbody shields will help prevent a fire even in such a scenario.' Included with the article are several animated pictures of testing done with the new underbody, which survives running over a trailer hitch, a concrete block, and an alternator."
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+ - 123 Ask Slashdot: What is the best bluetooth barcode scanner for the money 1

Submitted by DorianGre
DorianGre (61847) writes "New project: iphone and android apps connected to the cloud doing stock inventory. We are targeting the low end of the market, so need the most reliable and inter-operable bar code scanner on the market at the low end of the cost spectrum. We are bootstrapping our project and need to buy a few thousand of these, so cost matters alot."

+ - 126 U.S. Court: Chinese Search Engine's Censorship Is "Free Speech"->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "You will probably not be surprised to learn that Chinese search giant Baidu censors a wide range of content, particularly political material deemed to be pro-democracy — and does so for users everywhere, not just in China. A group of activists filed suit against Baidu in New York for violating free speech laws, but the judge in the case declared that, as a private entity in the United States, Baidu has the right to provide whatever kind of search results it wants, even for political reasons."
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+ - 218 Ask Slashdot: How to handle unfixed Linux accessibility bugs?

Submitted by dotancohen
dotancohen (1015143) writes "It is commonly said that open source software is preferable because if you need something changed, you can change it yourself. Well, I am not an Xorg developer and I cannot maintain a separate Xorg fork. Xorg version 1.13.1 introduced a bug which breaks the "Sticky Keys" accessibility option. Thus, handicapped users who rely on the feature cannot use Xorg-based systems with the affected versions and are stuck on older software versions. Though all pre-bug Linux distros are soon scheduled for retirement, there seems to be no fix in sight. Should disabled users stick with outdated, vulnerable, and unsupported Linux distros or should we move to OS-X / Windows? The prospect of changing my OS, applications, and practices due to such an ostensibly small issue is frightening.

Note that we are not discussing "I don't like change" but rather "this unintentional change is incompatible with my physical disability". Thus this is not a case of every change breaks someone's workflow."

+ - 150 The Highest-Flying Wind Turbine->

Submitted by Daniel_Stuckey
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "In far-flung rural Alaska, where electricity can cost as much as $1 per kilowatt hour—more than 10 times the national average, according to the New York Times —a wind turbine encased in a giant helium balloon is about to break a world record. The Bouyant Air Turbine (BAT) is about to be floated 1,000 feet into the air in the name of cleaner, cheaper, and mobile energy. That single airborne grouper—it's sort of a hybrid of a blimp, a kite, and a turbine—will power over a dozen homes.

The BAT is the brainchild of Altaeros, a company founded by MIT alumni, and, if everything goes according to plan, it's going to be the highest-flying power generator in history. Floating turbines higher up in the air, where wind speeds are greater isn't a new concept.
"

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+ - 147 Have we found our last fundamental particle? 1

Submitted by StartsWithABang
StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "In July 2012, the CMS and ATLAS collaborations jointly announced the discovery of the Higgs boson, now confirmed at more than 6- to be between 125 and 126 GeV. But years earlier, in 2009, it was calculated what mass the Higgs would need to be in order to keep the standard model stable, so that there would be no need for new particles all the way up to the Planck scale. The prediction? 126 GeV. If this is reasoning is correct, the Higgs boson will be the last new fundamental particle ever discovered by humanity."

+ - 163 Google Sacrificed Innovation to Avoid Pissing Off Steve Jobs

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "In addition to affecting one million employees, reports PandoDaily's Mark Ames, Apple and Google's wage-fixing cartel also sacrificed innovation so as not to anger Steve Jobs. "One the most interesting misconceptions I've heard about the 'Techtopus' conspiracy," writes Ames, "is that, while these secret deals to fix recruiting were bad (and illegal), they were also needed to protect innovation by keeping teams together while avoiding spiraling costs." Not so, argues Ames, who describes how Google cancelled plans to have former Apple employee Jean-Marie Hullot run a small engineering center in Paris after Jobs expressed his disapproval. A promise from Google Sr. VP of Knowledge Alan Eustace that "Jean-Marie will not be working on anything to do with cell phone handsets" wasn't good enough for Jobs, who told Eustace, "We’d strongly prefer that you not hire these guys [Hullot and his team]." Breaking the news to Hullot, Eustace wrote, "Steve is opposed to Google hiring these engineers. He didn't say why, and I don't think it is appropriate for me to go back for clarification. I can’t risk our relationship with Apple to make this happen over his objections." In a follow-up e-mail to Jobs, Eustace wrote, "Based on your strong preference that we not hire the ex-Apple engineers, Jean-Marie and I decided not to open a Google Paris engineering center. I appreciate your input into this decision, and your continued support of the Google/Apple partnership." Ames notes, "It's worth taking a moment to reflect, again, on what was happening here: in a field as critical and competitive as smartphones, Google's R&D strategy was being dictated, not by the company's board, or by its shareholders, but by a desire not to anger the CEO of a rival company." Jobs, who reportedly took glee in Google's only-too-eager termination of an employee who crossed his path, was apparently viewed as one not to be trifled with. Asked by lawyers last year to describe Steve Jobs' view on hiring in Silicon Valley, Google co-founder Sergey Brin responded, "I think Mr. Jobs' view was that people shouldn't piss him off. And I think that things that pissed him off were — would be hiring, you know — whatever.""

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