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+ - 162 Full Disclosure List Reborn Under New Operator->

Submitted by wiredmikey
wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Less than a week after announcing that it would suspended service indefinitely due to a conflict with an unnamed security researcher and ongoing legal threats, The Full Disclosure mailing list is coming back.

Gordon Lyon (aka Fyodor), who operates several Internet security resources and other mailing lists, has created a replacement list with the blessing of John Cartwright, one of of the creators of Full Disclosure, which served as a forum for the discussion of vulnerabilities and exploitation techniques and other security topics.

Because the list is getting a fresh start and no previous subscriber information appears to be headed to Lyon, interested users will have to manually subscribe which can be done here.

"Some have argued that we no longer need a Full Disclosure list, or even that mailing lists as a concept are obsolete," Lyon said. "I disagree. Mailing lists create a much more permanent record and their decentralized nature makes them harder to censor or quietly alter in the future.""

Link to Original Source

+ - 126 Brainswarming: because brainstorming sucks->

Submitted by JimmyQS
JimmyQS (690012) writes "The Harvard Business Review has an article/animation about a replacement to the outdated method of brainstorming: Brainswarming. Modeled after swarm intelligence, Brainswarming has people silently place ideas on problem solving graphs tailored to different types of problems. The result is many more ideas than brainstorming, brainwriting, or concept mapping. The process works because it mutes extroverts who usually dominate the conversation, while allowing for multiple simultaneous interactions and viewpoints."
Link to Original Source

+ - 188 UK Bans Sending Books to Prisoners

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Alan Travis and Mark Tran report in The Guardian that new rules introduced by the justice secretary in the UK ban anyone sending in books to prisoners as part of a new earned incentives and privileges scheme which allows better behaved prisoners getting better access to funds to buy their own books. But members of Britain's literary establishment have combined to condemn Justice Secretary Chris Grayling's ban on sending books to prisoners. "While we understand that prisons must be able to apply incentives to reward good behavior by prisoners, we do not believe that education and reading should be part of that policy," says a letter signed by more than 80 leading authors. "Books represent a lifeline behind bars, a way of nourishing the mind and filling the many hours that prisoners spend locked in their cells. In an environment with no internet access and only limited library facilities, books become all the more important." Prime Minister David Cameron's official spokesman says the prime minister backs the ban on receiving books and entirely supports Grayling, whose department imposed the ban to preserve a rigid system of rewards and punishments for prisoners and said there was no need for prisoners to be sent books as prisoners could borrow from prison libraries and keep some reading material in their cells. However a former prisoner told the Guardian that although libraries existed, access could be severely restricted, particularly in closed prisons. "I've been in places where prisoners only get 20 minutes a week to visit the library and change books.""

+ - 266 Verizon Knows your Wi-Fi SSID and Key-> 4

Submitted by FuzzyFox
FuzzyFox (772046) writes "While browsing my Verizon FIOS account settings on their web site, I happened to notice my Wi-Fi SSID was prominently displayed. Below that, I noticed a link that would also display the WPA2 password for my private network.

I was really surprised by this, because I did not tell Verizon this information, or ask them to store it on my behalf. It appears they have lifted the information remotely from the ActionTec router that they supplied me with.

It bothers me that they are storing this information about me, because it could conceivably be (1) stolen by hackers, (2) subpoena'd by the government, (3) silently borrowed by the NSA, or other uses that haven't yet come to mind.

Do other ISP's also silently store their customers' password information without the knowledge of the customer? Should we be outraged about this? I would rather that my private information not be stored without my consent, at the very least."

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+ - 97 "Cloud Week" continues: Google slashes cloud service prices->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "Google has revamped its portfolio of enterprise cloud services, by cutting prices, adding new features, and touting a refreshed enthusiasm for the cloud market. "We have been very seriously committed to the cloud as a business and product family," one executive said, noting that Google now runs over 4.75 million active applications on its services. Cloud Storage is now priced at $0.026 cents per GB per month, and $0.020 cents per GB per month for an option with reduced availability, regardless of the amount of data stored. Formerly, the company had a number of pricing tiers for storage, based on the amount of data being stored. Prices previously ranged from $0.085 per GB per month to $0.054 per GB per month. Google's news follows Cisco's pledge to put $1B into cloud services, http://www.networkworld.com/co... while Microsoft's new CEO Satya Nadella on Thursday is expected to make a big cloud announcement. http://www.networkworld.com/ne..."
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+ - 94 Apache CloudStack 4.3 Released->

Submitted by darthcamaro
darthcamaro (735685) writes "Apache CloudStack 4.3 is now out providing cloud users with a long list of new features. At the top of the list is support for Microsoft's Hyper-V, as well as support for scalable instance sizing that is unrelated to the auto-sizing feature common on all modern cloud platforms.Hugo Trippaers, vice president of Apache CloudStack explained that what Dynamic Comput provides is instead having to maintain lists of fixed compute offerings catering to all, a number of dynamic offerings can be made available, and the user has the freedom to set, for example, the number of CPUs.-"
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+ - 126 Minecraft cancels Oculus Rift released due to Facebook->

Submitted by sfcrazy
sfcrazy (1542989) writes "When Facebook bought Whatsapp a huge number of users migrated to much more open alternative Telegram and I was curious if we will see the same ‘Facebook’ effect on Oculus and that’s exactly what has happened. Minecraft has canceled their version for the virtual reality device as soon as they got the news of this acquisition. Markus Persson aka notch of Minecraft tweeted, “We were in talks about maybe bringing a version of Minecraft to Oculus. I just cancelled that deal. Facebook creeps me out.”"
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+ - 171 Waitstaff, Fast-food Workers, Other Minimum Wage Jobs Likeliest To Be Automated->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "An article at FiveThirtyEight looks at the likelihood of various occupations being replace by robot workers. It mentions President Obama's proposed increase to the federal minimum wage, saying big leaps in automation could reshape the debate. '[The wage increase] from $7.25 to $10.10 per hour could make it worthwhile for employers to adopt emerging technologies to do the work of their low-wage workers. But can a robot really do a janitor’s job? Can software fully replace a fast-food worker? Economists have long considered these low-skilled, non-routine jobs as less vulnerable to technological replacement, but until now, quantitative estimates of a job’s vulnerability have been missing from the debate.' Many minimum-wage jobs are reportedly at high risk, including restaurant workers, cashiers, and telemarketers. A study rated the probability of computerization (PDF) within 20 years at: 92% for retail salespeople, 97% for cashiers, and 94% for waitstaff. There are other jobs with a high likelihood too, but they employ fewer people and have a higher pay rate, like tax preparers (99%), freight workers (99%), and legal secretaries (98%)."
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+ - 120 Facebook Buys Oculus Rift for $2 Billion->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Hot on the heels of GDC comes word that Oculus Rift has been purchased by Facebook in a two billion dollar cash-and-stock deal.

Buckle up, the next few years are going to be a wild ride."

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+ - 102 Klingon Beer->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "We may not have Saurian Brandy or Romulan Ale, but we'll soon have Klingon Beer. Tin Man Brewing Company in Evansville, Indiana has gotten the OK from CBS to create 'Klingon Warnog,' a Dunkelweizen with 'a modern aroma [of] predominantly mild banana and clove.' It will have an ABV of 5.5%. The Klingon beer will apparently join Vulcan Ale in the Federation of Beer. I wonder what their Prime Directive is."
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+ - 140 Lasers to Solve the Black Hole Information Paradox?->

Submitted by astroengine
astroengine (1577233) writes "In an effort to help solve the black hole information paradox that has immersed theoretical physics in an ocean of soul searching for the past two years, two researchers have thrown their hats into the ring with a novel solution: Lasers. Technically, we’re not talking about the little flashy devices you use to keep your cat entertained, we’re talking about the underlying physics that produces laser light and applying it to information that falls into a black hole. According to two researchers who published a paper earlier this month to the journal Classical and Quantum Gravity, the secret to sidestepping the black hole information paradox (and, by extension, the "firewall" hypothesis that was recently argued against by Stephen Hawking) lies in stimulated emission of radiation (the underlying physics that generates laser light) at the event horizon that is distinct from Hawking radiation, but preserves information as matter falls into a black hole."
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+ - 115 Google Puts Amazon On Notice With New Cloud Platform Features

Submitted by snydeq
snydeq (1272828) writes "Google put Amazon squarely in the cloud services cross-hairs today, announcing new features and revamped pricing for its Google Cloud Platform, InfoWorld reports. The platform now includes improved testing and deployment tools and expanded VM support. 'The broad spectrum of changes announced for Google Cloud Platform revolved around a few basic sentiments: simplify the pricing structure of cloud computing; make it easier for developers to use the tools they're familiar and comfortable with; allow for easier (and cheaper) work with large amounts of data; and give developers the freedom to run their App Engine apps in IaaS-style VMs without sacrificing manageability.'"

+ - 112 Introducing Cybathlon: Championship for athletes using robotic assistive devices->

Submitted by Hallie Siegel
Hallie Siegel (2973169) writes "This new robotic competition will pair disabled athletes with robotics experts to create robotic assistive devices — and will culminate in a robotic "paralympics" in the fall of 2016. Expect to seek developments in exoskeletons, robotic prosthetics and brain-computer interface."
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+ - 122 Nvidia's Next-Gen GPU 'Pascal' To Incorporate New Technologies->

Submitted by mpicpp
mpicpp (3454017) writes "Nvidia is introducing two key technologies into Pascal with an emphasis toward machine learning and supercomputing. The first is called “NVLink,” which promises to boost PCIe speed by 5x to 12x. It does this by dramatically increasing the communication between CPU and GPU. (By the way, the reference card Nvidia touted on stage looks small than even the PCie slot itself.

The second key technology being incorporated into Pascal is 3D Memory. This is basically stacked DRAM memory which will take us from 100s of bits on a memory interfaces to 1000s of bits. It will be about 4x more energy efficient than Maxwell and is capable of 2.5x the memory capacity, at least upon launch.

Pascal will also allow for 5 times the bandwidth when it comes to multi-GPU scaling, which will be a crucial advancement for all manner of creative professionals, developers, and gamers.

Nvidia estimates that Pascal will hit the channel sometime in 2016. This is the only information I currently have based on Jen-Hsun Huang’s keynote speech, but I’ll have a closer look at the new technologies for you to read in the coming days."

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+ - 93 Diesel Books Shutting Down->

Submitted by kc_jeffro
kc_jeffro (2687189) writes "Per e-mail this afternoon from Scott Redford, "World Famous Diesel E-Books" is shutting-down: "Diesel eBooks will be closing at the end of this month. It's been a great ride! We're exploring our options — eBooks are still in the infant years and there are many opportunities opening up now and in the future. IMPORTANT: you must download your eBooks by month end. Downloads will not be possible on April 1st. We want to thank you for being such loyal customers. Understand this doesn't necessarily mean you won't see Diesel in another form in the near future." Given the timing, this could be an April Fools gag, but I don't think it is."
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+ - 102 Google Enterprise Cloud Services Get Price Cuts, More Features->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Google has made sizeable price cuts across its storage, compute and BigQuery analysis services (e.g., Google BigQuery on-demand prices have been reduced by up to 85%). Google has also introduced a number of new services, including managed virtual machines, an extension of BigQuery for live data and the ability to run copies of the enterprise-ready Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Suse Linux and Windows Server 2008 R2. Collectively, these announcements show that Google may be coming to understand that 'they really need to step it up' in the market for cloud computing services, said John Rymer, Forrester Research's principal analyst covering application development and delivery"
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+ - 218 Gasoline-Powered Cars To Emit Less CO2 Than Electric Cars?

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy (2660665) writes "One of the arguments for electric cars is that we are reducing green house gases and emitting less CO2 than vehicles with an internal combustion engine (ICE). But Mazda's saying its next-generation SkyActiv engines will be so efficient, they'll emit less CO2 than an electric car. In fact, the automaker goes so far as to say these new engines will be cleaner to run than electric cars. Is it possible? Yes, but it's all about the details. It'll depend on the test cycles for each region. Vehicles are tested differently in Europe than in the U.S., and that variation could make all the difference when it comes to these types of claims. At the end of the day whether future Mazdas with gasoline-powered engines are cleaner than electric cars or not, every little bit in the effort to reduce our carbon emissions per mile is a step in the right direction, right?"

+ - 141 IRS: Bitcoin Is Property, Not Currency->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Bloomberg reports, 'The U.S. government will treat Bitcoin as property for tax purposes, applying rules it uses to govern stocks and barter transactions, the Internal Revenue Service said in its first substantive ruling on the issue. Today’s IRS guidance will provide certainty for investors, along with potential income-tax liability. Under the ruling, purchasing a $2 cup of coffee with Bitcoins bought for $1 would trigger $1 in capital gains for the coffee drinker and $2 of income for the coffee shop. ... Under the IRS ruling, Bitcoin investors would be treated like stock investors. Bitcoins held for more than a year and then sold would pay the lower tax rates applicable to capital gains — a maximum of 23.8 percent compared with the 43.4 percent top rate on property sold within a year of purchase. For investors with losses, U.S. tax law allows taxpayers to subtract capital losses from any capital gains. They can also subtract up to $3,000 of capital losses a year from ordinary income.'"
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+ - 127 Ask Slashdot: Preparing for Windows XP EOL->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "As most of us working in IT may know, Microsoft will stop to support Windows XP on April 8th, 2014. Altough this fact has been known for quite some time, XP is still relatively popular in companies and also enjoys noticable marketshare for home users. Even ATMs are running XP and will continue to do so for some time. A lot of companies/users don't want to change because they see no additional benefit to do a costly upgrade, no reason to change a running system, and they may in some cases be right with their assumptions. So what is the best way to secure this remaining Windows XP systems? Installing the latest security patches, checking firewall status and user permissions etc. should be fairly obvious, as Microsoft Security Essentials may also not receive updates anymore, changing antivirus programs seems a sensible thing to do."
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+ - 133 Microsoft posts source code for MS-DOS and Word for Windows->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft, along with the Computer History Museum, has released the source code for MS-DOS 1.1 and 2.0, and Word for Windows 1.1a. Th DOS 2.0 was released for IBM PCs in 1983, and Word for Windows 1.1a came out in 1990. The museum has made the code available for non-commercial use with Microsoft's consent. They've also posted some historical information about the development of this software: '[In August, 1980], IBM had already contracted with Microsoft to provide a BASIC interpreter for the PC, so they asked them to investigate also providing the operating system. Microsoft proposed licensing “86-DOS”, which had been written by Tim Paterson at Seattle Computer Products (SCP) for their 8086-based computer kit because the 16-bit version of CP/M was late. When SCP signed the licensing deal [7] with Microsoft, they didn’t know for sure who the computer manufacturer was. Paterson said “We all had our suspicions that it was IBM that Microsoft was dealing with, but we didn’t know for sure.” [1] He left SCP to work for Microsoft in 1981. “The first day on the job I walk through the door and ‘Hey! It’s IBM.’” Microsoft originally licensed 86-DOS in December 1980 for a flat fee of $25,000. By the next summer they recognized the importance of owning it and being able to license it to other companies making IBM-PC clones, so they purchased all rights for an additional $50,000.'"
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+ - 165 The Mystery of the 'Only Camera to Come Back from the Moon'->

Submitted by Daniel_Stuckey
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "After a furious bidding war in Vienna on Saturday, a Japanese camera collector has bought a Hasselblad camera for $910,000 in a record-setting auction of what's been widely called the "only camera to come back from the moon."

But contrary to claims repeated across the Internet on Monday, this isn't the only camera to come back from the moon. In fact, some think it may have never landed on the moon at all. And because of rules surrounding most NASA property, its sale may actually violate US law.

One thing we know for sure, maybe: the 70mm Hasselblad 500 is one of fourteen cutting-edge cameras that astronauts used in orbit around the moon and on the lunar surface during the Apollo program. All of the images we have from those moon missions were taken by these machines, which were either mounted inside the command module that circled the moon or were attached to space suits at the chest.

This particular camera was, reports the Verge, among many other sources, "used on the moon during the Apollo 15 mission in 1971," and "is special in the fact that it's returned to Earth." That's because astronauts were often instructed to jettison their cameras on the lunar surface in order to save precious kilograms during the return trip."

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+ - 133 Regulation of Surveillance Tech Exports On the Table

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "The long shadow cast by the use of surveillance technology and so-called lawful intercept tools has spread across much of the globe and has sparked a renewed push in some quarters for restrictions on the export of these systems. Politicians and policy analysts, discussing the issue in a panel Monday, said that there is room for sensible regulation without repeating the mistakes of the Crypto Wars of the 1990s.

“There’s virtually no accountability or transparency, while he technologies are getting faster, smaller and cheaper,” Marietje Schaake, a Dutch member of the European Parliament, said during a panel discussion put on by the New America Foundation. “We’re often accused of over-regulating everything, so it’s ironic that there’s no regulation here. And the reason is that the member states [of the EU] are major players in this. The incentives to regulate are hampered by the incentives to purchase.

“There has been a lot of skepticism about how to regulate and it’s very difficult to get it right. There are traumas from the Crypto Wars. Many of these companies are modern-day arms dealers. The status quo is unacceptable and criticizing every proposed regulation isn’t moving us forward.”"

+ - 105 Mechanical hand maker group says they won't sell out->

Submitted by CannonballZ
CannonballZ (3592335) writes "The e-NABLE community has grown from a core maker group to over 500 members in a short time. Their creation? A mechanical hand device, made to function as close as possible to how a hand should, from raw and 3D printed materials, for less than $50 — $100. What they're saying now with attention and suitors at their door: No patents. No high costs. No selling out."
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+ - 103 MIT Researchers Create Platform To Build Secure Web Apps That Never Leak Data

Submitted by rjmarvin
rjmarvin (3001897) writes "Researchers in the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have developed a platform for building secure web applications and services that never decrypt or leak data http://sdt.bz/68972. MIT researcher Raluca Ada Popa, who previously worked on the Google and SAP-adopted CryptoDB, and her team have put a longstanding philosophy into practice: to never store unencrypted data on servers. They've redesigned the entire approach to securing online data by creating Mylar http://css.csail.mit.edu/mylar..., which builds and updates applications to keep data secure from server breaches with constant encryption during storage, only decrypting the data in the user's browser. Integrated with the open-source Meteor https://www.meteor.com/ framework, a Mylar prototype has already secured six application by changing only 35 lines of code."

+ - 161 Ouya Dropping 'Free-to-Play' Requirement->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "One of the Ouya micro-consoles's selling points has been that you can sample every game for free. That requirement is going away soon. In a blog post Ouya's Bob Mills said 'In the coming weeks, we’re going to let devs choose if they want to charge up front for their games. Now they’ll be able to choose between a free-to-try or paid model.' Good news for developers, perhaps not as good for customers. 'Maybe this new policy will attract new developers that can offer something compelling enough to be a system seller,' writes blogger Peter Smith."
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+ - 219 Former US President says Snowden disclosures are "good for Americans to know"->

Submitted by McGruber
McGruber (1417641) writes "Former United States President Jimmy Carter defended the disclosures by fugitive NSA contractor Edward Snowden on Monday, saying revelations that U.S. intelligence agencies were collecting meta-data of Americans' phone calls and e-mails have been "probably constructive in the long run."

"I think it's wrong," President Carter said of the NSA program. "I think it's an intrusion on one of the basic human rights of Americans, is to have some degree of privacy if we don't want other people to read what we communicate.""

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+ - 185 Remote ATM Attack Uses SMS To Dispense Cash->

Submitted by judgecorp
judgecorp (778838) writes "A newly discovered malware attack uses a smartphone connected to the computer that manages an ATM, and then sends an SMS message to instruct it to dispense cash. The attack was reported by Symantec, and builds on a previous piece of malware called Backdoor.Ploutus. It is being used in actual attacks, and Symantec has demonstrated it with an ATM in its labs, though it is not revealing the brand of the vulnerable machines."
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+ - 163 3D printer manufacturer goes to the extreme to make its printers open source

Submitted by Lemeowski
Lemeowski (3017099) writes "In a time where there's a "gold rush" for 3D printing patents, there's one company that's doing everything it can to keep its 3D printers as open as possible. Jeff Moe, CEO of Aleph Objects, said in an interview with Opensource.com that his company's strategy is "to not patent anything, but to establish prior art as soon as we can. So when we develop things we try to push it out there as soon as possible and hope to establish prior art if there isn't prior art already. That allows us to develop a lot more quickly." The company makes the Lulzbot 3D printers, and goes to the extreme of publishing every last detail about its printers, Moe said, including syncing its internal file system that it uses to share files on the development of the machine to the public every hour so you can see what they're doing. In the interview, Moe talks about his mission to be as open as possible."

+ - 143 WHO: Air Pollution "Killed 7 Million People" In 2012->

Submitted by dryriver
dryriver (1010635) writes "The BBC reports: Seven million people died as a result of air pollution in 2012, the World Health Organization estimates. Its findings suggest a link between air pollution and heart disease, respiratory problems and cancer. One in eight global deaths were linked with air pollution, making it 'the world's largest single environmental health risk', the WHO said. Nearly six million of the deaths had been in South East Asia and the WHO's Western Pacific region, it found. The WHO said about 3.3 million people had died as a result of indoor air pollution and 2.6 million deaths were related to outdoor air pollution, mainly in low- and middle-income countries in those regions. WHO public health, environmental and social determinants of health department director Dr Maria Neira said: 'The risks from air pollution are now far greater than previously thought or understood, particularly for heart disease and strokes. Few risks have a greater impact on global health today than air pollution.' 'The evidence signals the need for concerted action to clean up the air we all breathe.' Reducing air pollution could save millions of lives, said the WHO. 'Poor women and children pay a heavy price from indoor air pollution since they spend more time at home breathing in smoke and soot from leaky coal and wood cook stoves.'"
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+ - 136 Ask Slashdot: What's the fastest, cheapest way to get a Bachelor's degree? 2

Submitted by AnOminusCowHerd
AnOminusCowHerd (3399855) writes "I have an Associates degree in programming and systems analysis, and over a decade of experience in the field. I work primarily as a contractor, so I'm finding a new job/contract every year or two. And every year, it gets harder to convince potential employers/clients that 10-12 years of hands-on experience doing what they need done, trumps an additional 2 years of general IT education.

So, I'd like to get a Bachelor's degree (preferably IT-related, ideally CS, accredited of course). If I can actually learn something interesting and useful in the process, that would be a perk, but mainly, I just want a BSCS to add to my resume. I would gladly consider something like the new GA Tech MOOC-based MSCS degree program — in fact, I applied there, and was turned down. After the initial offering, they rewrote the admissions requirements to spell out the fact that only people with a completed 4-year degree would be considered, work experience notwithstanding."

+ - 119 Solar Power as cheap as conventional electricity ..->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Once all its costs are accounted for, the price of commercial solar power has pulled even with retail electricity rates in Italy and Germany, according to a new report ..

The analysis .. looked at a standard 30 kilowatt solar photovoltaic system for your average commercial building, and the built a methodology to assess its “leveled cost of energy” (LCOE) .. solar’s LCOE in Italy and Germany is now at “grid parity,” meaning it’s even with retail electricity prices in general in those countries. Spain’s already gotten there as well, and Mexico and France are coming up ..."

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+ - 137 Jimmy Wales rants at holistic healers petitioning Wikipedia ->

Submitted by Barence
Barence (1228440) writes "Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales has issued a sharp response to petitioners calling for his site to "allow for true scientific discourse" on holistic healing. The petition, currently running on the Change.org site, claims that much of the information on Wikipedia relating to holistic approaches to healing is "biased, misleading, out of date, or just plain wrong". It has attracted almost 8,000 supporters at the time of publication.

Wales's response to the petition, posted on the same page, is far from conciliatory: "No, you have to be kidding me," he writes. "Every single person who signed this petition needs to go back to check their premises and think harder about what it means to be honest, factual, truthful. What we won't do is pretend that the work of lunatic charlatans is the equivalent of 'true scientific discourse'. It isn't.""

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+ - 112 Einstein's Spooky Theory Could Bring Snowden's Encrypted Internet Dream to Life->

Submitted by concertina226
concertina226 (2447056) writes "Albert Einstein's "spooky" quantum mechanics theory about entangled particles that can stay connected even when separated by large distances could be applied to encrypt communications and improve security over the internet.

The phenomenon is known as the N-partite Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering and over half a century later in the 1990s, scientists finally succeeded in using it to securely transmit a message from one person to another.

They created a shared quantum key that decoded the message only for the sender and receiver – meaning that the message would be completely secure from interception until it was received. However, until now, the quantum key has only worked for sharing messages between two parties."

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+ - 155 Is There an Elegant Program?

Submitted by lxrslh
lxrslh (652069) writes "Since the dawn of computing, we have read about massive failed projects, bugs that are never fixed, security leaks, spaghetti code, and other flaws in the programs we use every day to operate the devices and systems upon which we depend. It would be interesting to read the code of a well-engineered, perfectly coded, intellectually challenging program. I would love to see the code running in handheld GPS units that first find a variable number of satellites and then calculate the latitude, longitude, and elevation of the unit. Do you have an example of a compact and elegant program for which the code is publicly available?"

+ - 168 Business is Booming as Credit Monitoring Firms Get a Big Boost From Hackers

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "As attacks like the one on Target have exposed up to 40 million customer payment card accounts and the names, addresses and email addresses of as many as 70 million shoppers, Tiffany Hsu and E. Scott Reckard report in the LA Times that increased activity by data hackers has produced millions of victims but there has been one big winner: credit monitoring businesses. "It's almost a terrible thing to say, but these kinds of situations raise awareness of the need to protect yourself and to be more vigilant in checking your transactions," says Yaron Samid. Meanwhile services with names such as BillGuard and Identity Guard report a surge in sign-ups from people anxious to be protected. For example, the number of AAA Southern California members opting in for the club's identity theft monitoring service — whether for free or for an extra charge — boomed in January, up 58% from December. "I have to believe part of it was these different data breaches that have been occurring, people being concerned about that," says Jeffrey Spring. The BillGuard credit monitoring application, launched in July, uses crowd-sourced reporting from its members to issue alerts about possible payment card security concerns. Since the Target breach, the app's user base has ballooned by nearly half a million participants and identified $1 million in fraud. “We have built a crowd-source system of identifying fraud on debit or credit cards,” says Samid. “The system will ask others if this charge is OK or not OK, and if system see a few people saying this is not an unauthorized charge, we alert others that it is potentially fraudulent. The more people that join the network, the more effective it gets." Card issuers and transaction processors have spent hundreds of millions of dollars dealing with electronic fraud in the last three years says Michael Moebs and consumers can soon expect increased annual fees to recoup the costs. "The view is data breaches and hacking have become a way of life, and the industry must get used to it.""

"A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices." -- William James

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