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+ - 271 Smithsonian Releasing 3D Models of Artifacts

Submitted by plover
plover (150551) writes "The Seattle Times reports "the Smithsonian Institution is launching a new 3D scanning and printing initiative to make more of its massive collection accessible to schools, researchers and the public worldwide. A small team has begun creating 3D models of some key objects representing the breadth of the collection at the world's largest museum complex. Some of the first 3D scans include the Wright brothers' first airplane, Amelia Earhart's flight suit, casts of President Abraham Lincoln's face during the Civil War and a Revolutionary War gunboat. Less familiar objects include a former slave's horn, a missionary's gun from the 1800s and a woolly mammoth fossil from the Ice Age. They are pieces of history some people may hear about but rarely see or touch."

So far they have posted 20 models on the site, with the promise of much more to come."

+ - 276 MenuetOS, an OS written entirely in assembly language, inches towards 1.0-> 2

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "MenuetOS is an open source GUI-equipped operating system written entirely in assembly language that can fit on a floppy disk (if you can find one). I originally spoke to its developers in 2009. Recently I had a chance to catch up with them to chat about what's changed and what needs to be done before the OS hits version 1.0 after 13 years of work."
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+ - 120 Military Robots Expected to Outnumber Troops by 2023->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "Autonomous robots programmed to scan city streets with thermal imaging and robotic equipment carriers created to aid in transporting ammunition and other supplies will likely outnumber U.S. troops in 10 years, according to robotic researchers and U.S. military officials. 5D Robotics, Northrop Grumman Corp., QinetiQ, HDT Robotics and other companies demonstrated a wide array of autonomous robots during a display at Ft. Benning in Georgia last month. The companies are already gaining traction in the military. For example, British military forces, use QinetiQ's 10-pound Dragon Runner robot, which can be carried in a backpack and then tossed into a building or a cave to capture and relay surveillance video. "Robots allow [soldiers] to be more lethal and engaged in their surroundings," said Lt. Col. Willie Smith, chief of Unmanned Ground Vehicles at Fort Benning, Ga. "I think there's more work to be done but I'm expecting we'll get there.""
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+ - 182 Tesla Planning an Electric Pickup Truck, Says Elon Musk

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy (2660665) writes "Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk says the company will make an electric pickup truck to compete with America's best-selling Ford F-Series pickups. Musk made the comment yesterday at the end of an interview at a tech conference in New York. Surrounded by questioners, Musk was asked if Tesla would ever make commercial fleet trucks (like for UPS or Fed Ex) and he responded that a consumer truck would be the company's best answer, because America's pickup truck sales numbers don't lie--that's what buyers want, and if Tesla wants to replace the most gasoline miles possible, that's what they should build. Musk said it will be about five years before the company builds its pickup however, giving it time to focus on another hurdle: breaking into the pickup market. Texas is where trucks rule, and Texas, as we know, is the Bermuda Triangle for Tesla."

+ - 116 HDMI Dongle Turns TVs Into Giant Android Tablets-> 2

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "The BiggiFi Indiegogo project is nearing its funding goal for a $79 HDMI dongle that essentially turns HDTVs into supersized Android tablets. The BiggiFi device is claimed to let users run unmodified Android apps on their TVs using their phone or tablet as the TV’s touchscreen — including motion input for games — without screen-mirroring overhead latency. As explained by BiggiFi creator Karl Zhao, an Android app on the user’s phone or tablet collects touch input signals and transmits them over WiFi to a server daemon in the Android Framework layer on the BiggiFi device, which passes the event data to the device driver layer. When the action finally reaches the app, it's as though the BiggiFi/TV system has its own physical touchscreen. The result is claimed to be a fairly lossless Android experience, and requires no modification to Android apps. The process supports input gestures such as slide, scroll, pinch, zoom, and soft keyboard input, and also supports vibration and accelerometer movements, enabling tilting for gameplay, according to the project. Camera and mic input will be added in the future. Oh, and an app for using iPhones and iPads as the remote touchscreen is also being developed."
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+ - 99 NFL and college football teams are racing to install Wi-Fi to attract rabid fans->

Submitted by mattydread23
mattydread23 (2793761) writes "Last year, the Philadelphia Eagles did a major upgrade to the Wi-Fi in their home stadium, and yesterday the team sponsored and event for other football teams interested in following suit. Writer Todd Weiss talked to execs from the Cincinnati Bengals and Alabama Crimson Tide to find out why they were so anxious to follow suit. Pat Neiser, sales manager for the Bengals, explains it's all about attracting rabid younger fans and turning them into lifers: "We want to make sure that young fans, who are getting out of college now, will be season ticket holders when they have future discretionary income,""
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+ - 132 Global Warming Since 1997 Underestimated by Half

Submitted by Layzej
Layzej (1976930) writes "A new paper shows that global temperature rise of the past 15 years has been greatly underestimated. The reason is that the weather station network covers only about 85% of the planet. Satellite data shows that the parts of the Earth that are not covered by the surface station network, especially the arctic, have warmed exceptionally fast over the last 15 years. Most temperature reconstructions simply omit any region not covered. A temperature reconstruction developed by NASA somewhat addresses the gaps by filling in missing data using temperatures from the nearest available observations. Now Kevin Cowtan (University of York) and Robert Way (University of Ottawa) have developed a new method to fill the data gaps using satellite data.

The researchers describe their methods and findings in this youtube video. "The most important part of our work was testing the skill of each of these approaches in reconstructing unobserved temperatures. To do this we took the observed data and further reduced the coverage by setting aside some of the observations. We then reconstructed the global temperatures using each method in turn. Finally, we compared the reconstructed temperatures to the observed temperatures where they are available... While infilling works well over the oceans, the hybrid model works particularly well at restoring temperatures in the vicinity of the unobserved regions."

The authors note that "While short term trends are generally treated with a suitable level of caution by specialists in the field, they feature significantly in the public discourse on climate change.""

+ - 240 Scientists Confirm World's Oldest Creature...But Kill it Determining Its Age-> 3

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "In 2006, climate change experts from Bangor University in north Wales found a very special clam while dredging the seabeds of Iceland. At that time scientists counted the rings on the inside shell to determine that the clam was the ripe old age of 405. Unfortunately, by opening the clam which scientists refer to as "Ming," they killed it instantly.

Cut to 2013, researchers have determined that the original calculations of Ming's age were wrong, and that the now deceased clam was actually 102 years older than originally thought. Ming was 507 years old at the time of its demise.

“But we are absolutely certain that we’ve got the right age now.""

Link to Original Source

+ - 126 ATF Tests Show 3D Printed Guns Can Explode, Injure Users->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "The ATF has been testing 3D printed guns over the past year and, not surprisingly, has found that depending on the thermoplastics, 3D printers and CAD designs used, some can explode on the first attempt to shoot them. The ATF published videos this week of the tests on YouTube showing what looked like a Liberator model of a 3D gun exploding upon being fired. Another model, created with the popular ABS polymer and an advanced printer, could fire as many as 8 shots. The tests were published at a time when a law passed in 1988 banning the sale of plastic guns made entirely of plastic is set to expire next month."
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+ - 210 More Evidence the NSA is Harming American's Economy 2

Submitted by anagama
anagama (611277) writes ""Cisco has seen a huge drop-off in demand for its hardware in emerging markets, which the company blames on fears about the NSA using American hardware to spy on the rest of the world. ... Cisco saw orders in Brazil drop 25% and Russia drop 30%. ... Analysts had expected Cisco’s business in emerging markets to increase 6%, but instead it dropped 12%, sending shares of Cisco plunging 10% in after-hours trading."

This is in addition to the harm caused to remote services that may cost $35 billion over the next three years. Then of course there are the ways the NSA has made ID theft easier. ID theft cost Americans $1.52 billion in 2011, to say nothing of the time wasted in solving ID theft issues — some of that figure is certainly attributable to holes the NSA helped build.

The NSA, its policies, and the politicians who support the same are directly responsible for massive losses of money and jobs which might cause one to wonder, why do these people hate America and Americans so much?"

+ - 264 TSA Screening Barely Working Better Than Chance ->

Submitted by rwise2112
rwise2112 (648849) writes "The General Accounting Office (GAO) has completed a study of the TSAs SPOT (Screening of Passengers by Observation Techniques) program and found the program is only slightly better than chance at finding criminals. Given that the TSA has spent almost a billion dollars on the program, that's a pretty poor record. As a result, the GAO is requesting that both Congress and the president withhold funding from the program until the TSA can demonstrate its effectiveness."
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+ - 118 All-in-one Digital Credit Card->

Submitted by NoImNotNineVolt
NoImNotNineVolt (832851) writes "Coin, a Y Combinator-backed startup, has started accepting pre-orders for a device as slim as a standard piece of payment plastic that can hold eight credit, debit, and gift cards in its dynamic magnetic stripe. Paired with the Coin smartphone app via Bluetooth low energy, card details can easily be swapped in and out of the device. A minimalist user interface on the device itself allows the owner to toggle between the loaded cards and then swipe just as they would their ordinary card. All card details are encrypted (both on the device and in the smartphone app), and the device's on-board battery is expected to last for two years of typical usage. No support for chip&pin (EMV) yet, so this may have limited utility outside of the USA. They expect to start shipping in summer of 2014."
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+ - 167 Google Books case dismissed on Fair Use Grounds

Submitted by NewYorkCountryLawyer
NewYorkCountryLawyer (912032) writes "In a case of major importance, the long simmering battle between the Authors Guild and Google has reached its climax, with the court granting Google's motion for summary judgment, dismissing the case, on fair use grounds. In his 30-page decision (PDF), Judge Denny Chin — who has been a District Court Judge throughout most of the life of the case but is now a Circuit Court Judge — reasoned that, although Google's own motive for its "Library Project" (which scans books from libraries without the copyright owners' permission and makes the material publicly available for search), is commercial profit, the project itself serves significant educational purposes, and actually enhances, rather than detracts from, the value of the works, since it helps promote sales of the works. Judge Chin also felt that it was impossible to use Google's scanned material, either for making full copies, or for reading the books, so that it did not compete with the books themselves."

+ - 208 Amazon hints at details on its CIA Franken-cloud ->

Submitted by coondoggie
coondoggie (973519) writes "Amazon Web Services recently won a reported $600 million contract to build the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) a cloud. But that cloud will not look like any other cloud on the planet. Amazon will build the cloud using AWS architectures and AWS will manage it, but executives hinted that it will not be accessed the way other customers use AWS services through the public Internet. “We’re managing the operations in the data center,” Andy Jassy, Amazon’s senior vice president and the head of the company’s cloud computing division AWS said about the CIA deal. “It’s our hardware, it’s our networking.”"
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+ - 125 PostgreSQL now available on Amazon's RDS

Submitted by wumbler
wumbler (3428467) writes "For a long time, Amazon has already provided MySQL support as part of its 'Relational Database Service' (RDS). Developers didn't have to worry about replication and high availability, since Amazon took care of this automatically, relieving site operators from the complex system administration tasks associated with setting up and running a database cluster. The big drawback of RDS? Only MySQL was supported, fans of the ever more popular PostgreSQL were left out. Today, Amazon finally announced availability for PostgreSQL. Amazon's RDS just became a whole lot more interesting."

+ - 190 NSA wants to reveal its secrets to prevent Snowden from revealing them first

Submitted by binarstu
binarstu (720435) writes "According to a recent report by Tom Gjelten of NPR, 'NSA officials are bracing for more surveillance disclosures from the documents taken by former contractor Edward Snowden — and they want to get out in front of the story. ... With respect to other information held by Snowden and his allies but not yet publicized, the NSA is now considering a proactive release of some of the less sensitive material, to better manage the debate over its surveillance program.'"

+ - 142 Stephen Wolfram Developing New Programming Language->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Stephen Wolfram, the chief designer of the Mathematica software platform and the Wolfram Alpha “computation knowledge engine,” has another massive project in the works—although he’s remaining somewhat vague about details for the time being. In simplest terms, the project is a new programming language—which he’s dubbing the “Wolfram Language”—which will allow developers and software engineers to program a wide variety of complex functions in a streamlined fashion, for pretty much every single type of hardware from PCs and smartphones all the way up to datacenters and embedded systems. The Language will leverage automation to cut out much of the nitpicking complexity that dominates current programming. “The Wolfram Language does things automatically whenever you want it to,” he wrote in a recent blog posting. “Whether it’s selecting an optimal algorithm for something. Or picking the most aesthetic layout. Or parallelizing a computation efficiently. Or figuring out the semantic meaning of a piece of data. Or, for that matter, predicting what you might want to do next. Or understanding input you’ve given in natural language.” In other words, he’s proposing a general-purpose programming language with a mind-boggling amount of functions built right in. At this year’s SXSW, Wolfram alluded to his decades of work coming together in “a very nice way,” and this is clearly what he meant. And while it’s tempting to dismiss anyone who makes sweeping statements about radically changing the existing paradigm, he does have a record of launching very big projects (Wolfram Alpha contains more than 10 trillion pieces of data cultivated from primary sources, along with tens of thousands of algorithms and equations) that function reliably. At many points over the past few years, he’s also expressed a belief that simple equations and programming can converge to create and support enormously complicated systems. Combine all those factors together, and it’s clear that Wolfram’s pronouncements—no matter how grandiose—can’t simply be dismissed. But it remains to be seen how much of an impact he actually has on programming as an art and science."
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+ - 96 Android Gains 81% of Smartphone Market->

Submitted by CowboyRobot
CowboyRobot (671517) writes "Android has a commanding lead over all other smartphone operating systems, according to data from IDC. Hardware makers shipped a combined 211.6 million Android smartphones during the third quarter of the year. Samsung alone accounted for 39.9%. At the same time, Apple saw its share of the smartphone market slip further, while Microsoft continued to make gains. "We believe the absence of a large-screen device may have contributed to Apple's inability to grow share in the third quarter," said Ryan Reith, Program Director with IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker. The sooner Apple can bring iPhones with large screens to market, the better."
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+ - 106 Facebook removing search opt-out->

Submitted by jakimfett
jakimfett (2629943) writes "Thought that you had your Facebook account locked down so people couldn't find you using your name? Think again. Facebook is now forcibly disabling the "hide me from search results" feature. Last December, Facebook removed the option for people who hadn't already opted out, but now Facebook is removing it for everyone else. Who can search for your timeline by name? Anyone you haven't blocked.

Facebook claims that this is to remove an "old setting", implying that few people use the option or that it is outdated. But for anyone who has ever been stalked, this is bad news."

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+ - 103 US Government Requests for Google User Data Double

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "In the first six months of this year, Google received seven wiretap orders from the United States government and complied with all of them. The company also received 207 pen register requests in the same period and complied with 89 percent of them, according to Google’s new transparency report.

The company’s latest report reveals a fairly dramatic increase in the volume of user data requests from the U.S. government since the beginning of 2010. In the first half of that year, Google received 4,287 requests for user data. In the latest reporting period, the company got 10,918 requests. However, the percentage of requests that Google complies with has been dropping over time, with the company providing some data in 94 percent of requests in the second half of 2010 and 83 percent in the first half of 2013. Overall, requests from all governments have more than doubled since 2010."

+ - 168 EU To Allow 3G And 4G Connections On Planes->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "In America we're celebrating the fact that we don't have to stow our Kindles during takeoff and landing anymore, but the EU is going a step further and not requiring passengers to switch their phones to "airplane" mode anymore. If you're on an airplane with a Network Control Unit that regulate cellular connections, you can text and make calls over standard 3G and 4G networks. You'll want to watch out for roaming charges, though, especially if you're on a flight crossing national borders."
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+ - 117 Sears to Convert Old Auto Centers into National Chain of Data Centers ->

Submitted by 1sockchuck
1sockchuck (826398) writes "Sears plans to convert dozens of Sears Auto Center stores into a national chain of server farms, saying it wants to be “the McDonald’s or Starbucks of data centers.” The strategy is an evolution of Sears Holdings' previously announced plan to turn old Sears and Kmart stores into IT centers. Instead, it will focus on the more than 700 Sears Auto Centers, which include many stand-alone cement buildings on mall perimeters. Ubiquity Critical Environments, the data center arm of Sears, will team with Schneider Electric to turn these sites into data centers. They'll use repeatable modular designs to add power and cooling infrastructure, targeting at least 23 smaller cities where there currently aren't many options for IT outsourcing."
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+ - 172 Court: Homeland Security Must Disclose 'Internet Kill Switch'->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) must disclose its plans for a so-called Internet “kill switch,” a federal court ruled on Tuesday.

The United States District Court for the District of Columbia rejected the agency’s arguments that its protocols surrounding an Internet kill switch were exempt from public disclosure and ordered the agency to release the records in 30 days. However, the court left the door open for the agency to appeal the ruling."

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+ - 233 Astronomers Discover Largest Structure in the Universe->

Submitted by KentuckyFC
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "Until now, the largest known structure in the Universe was the Huge-LQG (Large Quasar Group), a cluster of 73 quasars stretching over a distance of 4 billion light years. Now astronomers say they've spotted something even bigger in data from gamma ray bursts, the final explosions of energy released by stars as they die and the universe's most energetic events. Astronomers have measured the distance to 283 of these bursts and mapped their position in the universe. This throws up a surprise. At a distance of ten billion light years, there are more gamma ray bursts than expected if they were evenly distributed throughout the universe. This implies the existence of a structure at this distance that is about ten billion light years across and so dwarfs the Huge-LQG. What's odd about the discovery is that the Cosmological principle--one of the fundamental tenets of cosmology--holds that the distribution of matter in the universe will appear uniform if viewed at a large enough scale. And yet, structures clearly emerge at every scale astronomers can see. The new discovery doesn't disprove the principle but it does provide some interesting food for thought for theorists."
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+ - 131 Oops! Invisibility Cloaks Actually Make Objects Easier to See->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "It's often a case of swings and roundabouts. If you save money by buying a house out of town, you spend more time and money commuting. If you really measure the momentum of an electron, you have no idea where the little guy is located. And now, according to a new analysis by a pair of University of Texas electrical engineers, the better an object is hidden by an invisibility cloak at a given wavelength of light, the easier it is to see at other wavelengths. Swings and roundabouts."
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+ - 167 Could Slashdot (Or Any Other Company) Sue a Spy Agency Like GCHQ or NSA?->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "When the GCHQ agency (Britain’s equivalent of the National Security Agency) reportedly decided to infiltrate the IT network of Belgian telecommunications firm Belgacom, it relied on a sophisticated version of a man-in-the-middle attack, in which it directed its targets' computers to fake, malware-riddled versions of Slashdot and LinkedIn. If the attack could be proven without a doubt, would the GCHQ—or any similar spy agency engaging in the same sort of behavior—be liable for violating trademarks or copyrights, since a key part of its attack would necessitate the appropriation of intellectual property such as logos and content? We asked someone from the Electronic Frontier Foundation about that, and received a somewhat dispiriting answer. “From a trademark perspective, if a company uses another company’s marks/logos to deceive, there may be a trademark claim,” said Corynne McSherry, the EFF’s Intellectual Property Director. “But it’s complicated a bit by two problems: (1) the fact that while there may be confusion, it’s not necessarily related to the actual purchase of any goods and services; and (2) multiple TM laws are in play here—for example UK trademark law may have different exceptions and limitations.” McSherry also addressed other issues, including governments' doctrine of sovereign immunity."
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+ - 199 How Snowden Did It->

Submitted by ancientribe
ancientribe (1057834) writes "Key clues are emerging that provide a clearer picture of how Edward Snowden may have pulled off the most epic insider leak in history. Security firm Venafi says it has figured out how it all went down: Snowden fabricated SSH keys and self-signed digital certificates to access and ultimately steal the NSA documents, Venafi has concluded based on public information on the breach and their analysis. Venafi is also publicly challenging the NSA and Snowden to prove its conclusion wrong."
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+ - 280 U.S. Government Circulates Watch List of Buyers of Polygraph Book/DVD/Training 1

Submitted by George Maschke
George Maschke (699175) writes "Investigative reporter Marisa Taylor of the McClatchy newspaper group reports that a list of 4,904 individuals who purchased a book, DVD, or personal training on how to pass a polygraph test has been circulated to nearly 30 federal agencies including the CIA, NSA, DIA, DOE, TSA, IRS, and FDA. Most of the individuals on the list purchased former police polygraphist Doug Williams' book, How to Sting the Polygraph, which explains how to pass or beat a polygraph test. Williams also sells a DVD on the subject and offers in-person training. In February 2013, federal law enforcement officials seized Williams' business records, from which the watch list was primarily compiled. Williams has not been charged with a crime."

+ - 179 Bitcoin Value Passes $400 Ahead of Virtual Currency Hearing at US Senate->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The value of bitcoin has surged through the $400 barrier for the first time, as unprecedented growth sees the virtual currency's value quadruple in just three months.

Meanwhile, on 18 November, a Senate subcommittee is scheduled to hold a hearing on virtual currencies like bitcoin and its lesser-known competitors litecoin and altcoin. The hearing comes after a unit of the Treasury Department earlier this year issued guidelines stating virtual currencies should be subject to the same anti-money-laundering laws as traditional currency-transfer businesses like Western Union."

Link to Original Source

+ - 221 DRM to be used in Renault Electric Cars->

Submitted by mahiskali
mahiskali (1410019) writes "Cup holder? Check. Steering wheel? Check. DRM...for your battery? The new Renault Zoe comes with a "feature" that absolutely nobody wants. Instead of selling consumers a complete car that they can use, repair, and upgrade as they see fit, Renault has opted to lock purchasers into a rental contract with a battery manufacturer and enforce that contract with digital rights management (DRM) restrictions that can remotely prevent the battery from charging at all. This coming on the heels of the recent Trans-Pacific Partnership IP Rights Chapter leak certainly makes you wonder how much of that device (car?) you really own. Perhaps Merriam-Webster can simply change the definition of ownership."
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+ - 187 Skype Is Evaluating Adding Typing Suppression Feature

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "At a press event in Stockholm, Sweden today, Skype confirmed it is evaluating the addition of a typing suppression feature to its desktop clients that will automatically filter the sound of your fingers hitting the keys. Unfortunately, the Microsoft-owned company isn’t ready to ship the functionality yet, despite it being available in the company’s enterprise-focused Lync tool."

+ - 147 Game Dev says 10.1m illegal downloads = 176k actual lost sales->

Submitted by clickclickdrone
clickclickdrone (964164) writes "Football Manager boss Miles Jacobson has revealed the true extent of video game piracy on PC.

10.1m people have illegally downloaded Football Manager 2013, he said on stage at London Games Conference 2013.

Jacobson said that he does not believe that one pirated game equals one lost sale "That would be ridiculous to think," he said. But based on the drop in activations, he estimated piracy cost them 176,000 lost sales. He added that 1.74 per cent of illegal downloaders would potentially purchase the game had no crack been available"

Link to Original Source

+ - 212 Dart 1.0 Released->

Submitted by stoolpigeon
stoolpigeon (454276) writes "Yesterday marked the release of Dart SDK 1.0, a cross-browser, open source toolkit for structured web applications. The Dart SDK 1.0 includes everything you need to write structured web applications: a simple yet powerful programming language, robust tools, and comprehensive core libraries. The language has been somewhat controversial but Google continues to move it forward."
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+ - 93 Gutenburg project asking to Canadians to say No to Trans-Pacific Partnership->

Submitted by Direshot
Direshot (2814307) writes "The Gutenburg project is asking Canadians to write "a short and very clear email" to their respective members of Parliament and to Minister of International Trade to tell them the enormous harm that the TPP would inflict on the citizens of Canada, the U.S., and all the other TPP countries."
Link to Original Source

+ - 150 POV-Ray is now FLOSS->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Starting with version 3.7, POV-Ray is released under the AGPLv3 (or later) license and thus is Free Software according to the FSF definition.

        "Free software" means software that respects users' freedom and community. Roughly, the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. With these freedoms, the users (both individually and collectively) control the program and what it does for them.

Full source code is available, allowing users to build their own versions and for developers to incorporate portions or all of the POV-Ray source into their own software provided it is distributed under a compatible license (for example, the AGPL3 or — at their option — any later version). The POV-Ray developers also provide officially-supported binaries for selected platforms (currently only Microsoft Windows, but expected to include OS X shortly)."

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