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Comment: Re:Time to shut down the WTO (Score -1) 327

by artor3 (#45242717) Attached to: Antigua Looks Closer To Legal "Piracy" of US-Copyrighted Works

Are you familiar with the phrase "proportionality"?

I suspect that if we were to bomb Antigua's lovely beaches, it would suddenly be on the tip of your tongue.

It's not as though the US seriously harmed Antigua by banning online gambling. They still make untold millions through tourism.

Comment: Re:Time to shut down the WTO (Score 3, Insightful) 327

by Namarrgon (#45242715) Attached to: Antigua Looks Closer To Legal "Piracy" of US-Copyrighted Works

Both should respect each others property and businesses and laws

Guess who sets out those principles of international respect for property, businesses etc? The same WTO that you want shut down.

The US agreed in 1995 to abide by the WTO's principles and rules. If they no longer want to, they're free to withdraw, but they can't expect other nations to respect the rules if they won't.

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Comment: Re: Sounds counter-productive... (Score 1) 1160

The EU could be running afoul of illegal restraint of trade with their actions on this law as well, so they're certainly playing a game of brinkmanship, and I think it's only fair that it costs them. They aren't going to jump in and violate some US-held patents, because the US had ample justification, while the EU will be seen as the villain, and probably have to answer to the WTO.

Comment: Re:Hangings (Score 1) 1160

Your argument is equally applicable in reverse, though. Think of the symbolism of a planned, carefully enacted execution of a man who is later found innocent - it's outright disgusting. If you place that much value in the symbolic aspect of it, then you should understand why this is very different from those "extra 1 in 100k chance of death" calculations you've brought up earlier.

Don't get me wrong, I fully agree that there are crimes for which death penalty is a perfectly appropriate punishment. I just don't believe that any justice system anywhere in the world is even remotely close to be good enough to consider actually applying death penalty, given the chance of mistake and the gravity of it.

Comment: Re:Advertisements (Score 2) 40

by davester666 (#45242695) Attached to: The Internet Archive Switches To HTTPS Connections By Default

It raises costs, while providing them with no value [at least until sites like ars switches to https and tells them to fuck off unless they do as well]. And with online ads decreasing in value [and decreasing even faster for mobile ads], they really don't want to increase costs.

And it's not just a one-time certificate purchase, it's a bunch more powerful servers to do this encryption and electricity to run the servers and more people to keep their cobbled together solution working with these new servers.

Comment: Re:20 year lifespan (Score 1) 372

by Agripa (#45242693) Attached to: NYC's 250,000 Street Lights To Be Replaced With LEDs By 2017

LED lighting systems don't have ballasts. True, LEDs require power conditioning (for these applications, it's some sort of switched mode AC/DC converter with constant current output), but those kinds of circuits are highly efficient and robust.

"Some sort of switched mode AC/DC converter with a constant current output" is a ballast. That is exactly what you find in an electronic ballasts designed for discharge lamps. In consumer based lighting, the electronic ballast used for either discharge lighting or LEDs is the least reliable part.

Comment: Re:Hangings (Score 1) 1160

Well I think the number should be much higher than 40 per year. It isn't a cost thing. And it isn't a deterrent thing. Far more criminals are killed by other criminals than the state will ever kill.

What it is I think is a symbolism thing. It is the society reasserting moral authority in a very powerful way. To pick an example: finding Saddam Hussein in a hole, digging him out, having him stand before his victims now helpless in court and then wrapping a rope around his neck asserted to the Iraqis, especially the Sunni and Kurds that their country was their country not a Sunni colony. It was a moment of human freedom.

Andrew Reid Lackey I think is the latest killing. He mutilated the body of a juvenile he just murdered. That's what got him executed rather than life. Lackey came to repentance and wanted the execution he understood the symbolism that through his death he does the most he can to redeem himself for his acts.

Comment: Re:Public domain (Score 5, Informative) 327

by NoMaster (#45242689) Attached to: Antigua Looks Closer To Legal "Piracy" of US-Copyrighted Works

Sounds less like 'piracy', and more like early America, where our forebears had little stake in maintaining the seemingly unjust control of foreign interests, but much interest in creating a large body of works that the public could use to generate culture in this new world.

Very true. And not just foreign interests either. Look at the history of the American film industry who, in the space of ~2 years, moved en mass from New York & New Jersey to Hollywood, at least partially to get as far away as possible from Edison and the heavies he sent out to threaten filmmakers & 'confiscate' cameras - all in the name of patents & intellectual property.

Comment: Re:In other news... (Score 1) 99

by meerling (#45242683) Attached to: Network Scientists Discover the 'Dark Corners' of the Internet
Don't forget that not all information is equal, nor is it likely to be sought out by the same individuals. I thought that kind of stuff was first term communication basics. And of course, the internet really is just a giant communications network.
Oh well, not all 'eggheads' can be AAA X-large, some of them are month old quail. :p

Comment: Re:Time to shut down the WTO (Score 1) 327

by AK Marc (#45242677) Attached to: Antigua Looks Closer To Legal "Piracy" of US-Copyrighted Works
The US signed a law stating they will enforce US law world-wide (even when that law is self-contradictory). When someone else pulls this on the US, the neo-cons whine about a New World Order and such, but when the US crushes other independent states, it's a Good Thing (tm).

Comment: Re:Hurr durr (Score 3, Insightful) 327

by swillden (#45242675) Attached to: Antigua Looks Closer To Legal "Piracy" of US-Copyrighted Works

said to be recommending the establishment by the Government of Antigua & Barbuda of a statutory body to own, manage and operate the ultimate platform to be created for the monetisation or other exploitation of the suspension of American intellectual property rights authorised

Why does this press release read like an EULA? I mean that is a retarded amount of long words to describe a very simple idea. Why can't they just write it up as "We're bringing back fair use, bitches!"

Because this has nothing to do with fair use. Fair use is restricted to non-commercial, educational, etc., use. This is about unrestricted, anything-goes use.

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Comment: Re:Time to shut down the WTO (Score 4, Insightful) 327

by swillden (#45242671) Attached to: Antigua Looks Closer To Legal "Piracy" of US-Copyrighted Works

So we aren't allowed to have any laws that might negatively impact the earnings of another nation? I'd prefer to have national sovereignty, thanks.

Sure we are. There's nothing requiring us to honor our international trade agreements. We can break 'em if we like. However, that means that other countries don't have to honor their sides of the bargains either... hence the WTO suspending US copyrights for Antigua and Barbuda. We ignore our obligations and damage them, so they can ignore their obligations to us.

No loss of sovereignty, just a consequence of what essentially boils down to international breach of contract.

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Comment: Re:1000 new medals please (Score 1) 470

by hairyfish (#45242669) Attached to: Would-Be Tesla Owners Jump Through Hoops To Skirt Wacky Texas Rules

Seriously. Come up with some better arguments. Like, maybe ones that aren't complete nonsense.

How is it nonsense? A nuclear weapon is covered by the second amendment is is not? You only call it nonsense because it exposes the flaw in your logic. The right to bear arms is clearly ends when the arms are sufficiently powerful enough to cause too much damage. The question is where you you draw the line? Clearly you agree with Nuclear weapons? How about a Tomahawk cruise missle? Sidewinder A2AM? Gau-8? M134? AK47? We both seem to agree that there is a line in there somewhere, you just refuse to admit it.

Comment: Re:I donâ(TM)t suppose... (Score 1) 622

by lgw (#45242667) Attached to: Feds Confiscate Investigative Reporter's Confidential Files During Raid

Different police states have different shapes, and any difference we have from the others is a different in degree, not a difference in kind.

For example, we don't have a network of informants, no neighbors squealing nor children tattling on parents, instead we have a government agency that records every phone call made in the country, and every email. The IRS openly targets political groups that oppose the party in power. Administration officials call people who oppose their plans "economic traitors", and while, no, they aren't being shot yet, the president maintains his right to unilaterally order assassinations.

Are we in the top 3 worst police states? No. We don't even have a fleet of execution vans. We can still pull back from the edge, maybe, if people wake up in time. Maybe.

Comment: Linked in is the ultimate sleeze company (Score 1) 122

by WaffleMonster (#45242657) Attached to: LinkedIn's New Mobile App Called 'a Dream For Attackers'

Everything about this company is seedy and disgusting. Their "engineer" openly bragging on a blog about "doing the impossible" with a little IMAP MITM is breathtaking. Just about what we've come to expect from these assholes.

At this point I have to ponder who in their right mind would associate with or hire anyone still idiotic enough to keep using this "service"?

Comment: Re:Time to shut down the WTO (Score 5, Insightful) 327

by dnavid (#45242655) Attached to: Antigua Looks Closer To Legal "Piracy" of US-Copyrighted Works

The Senate votes to modify or repeal it, and the President signs off. Same with any time the US does anything with a treaty.

That doesn't solve anything, because even if the US withdraws from the WTO, they cannot prevent Antigua from suspending US copyright within its borders. As I point out above, the WTO is the only thing that makes US copyright law valid anywhere outside the US in the first place. Withdraw from the WTO, and who's going to enforce US copyright law outside the US? Why would any country enforce US copyright law when the US acts to ignore international law in this area.

I suspect that media creation is an area where the US has a huge trade surplus. In a world where the US ignores everyone else's intellectual property law and everyone else ignores US intellectual property law, everyone else wins and the US loses. The US needs the rest of the world to play ball far, far more than everyone else needs the US to do so. This is a fact I think most sovereignty-nuts fail to understand: the US probably exports more of its laws than it imports others. In a world where the US decided not to subject itself to any international law, its own interests would be the ones most impacted.

Comment: Re:I donâ(TM)t suppose... (Score 1) 622

Not necessarily. If the warrant specified that a car could be searched, and the house were searched, instead, that's exceeding the scope. Looking in folders for guns is perfectly reasonable, as there are small guns [smartplanet.com] that will fit easily under or inside a stack of papers. Once the investigators are authorized to look somewhere, there is no requirement that they ignore anything else questionable that they see, including merely documents with FOUO markings.

Sorry I'm not buying it, and I don't think any honest judge would, either. No reasonable person would believe it, which is an actual legal standard. It's patently obvious the firearm search warrant was a fabricated excuse to toss the journalist's home to find the identity of whistle-blowers.

The searchers had no legal basis for searching documents, sorry. This was an illegal search & seizure carried out by the government to identify those in government who are revealing the government's illegal and un-Constitutional actions.

Those involved in this should be serving multiple decades in prison without parole, and the officials at the top should be swinging from a hangman's rope or facing a firing squad.

It's all fun & games until it's *your* turn under the jackboots.

Strat

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Comment: Re:Time to shut down the WTO (Score 1) 327

by Namarrgon (#45242635) Attached to: Antigua Looks Closer To Legal "Piracy" of US-Copyrighted Works

What makes you think US-passed laws have anything to do with Antigua and Barbuda, a foreign nation with its own laws? US laws aren't being "overruled", they simply don't apply outside the US.

There are international organisations such as the WTO and WIPO that set trade rules that both these nations have each agreed to abide by. The US is free to lodge a dispute with them, but they might not get very far considering it was the US who violated those rules in the first place.

And of course, the US has no power to "shut down" the WTO. They can continue to ignore it and keep violating WTO rules where it suits them, but then more nations will do simply the same and follow in Antigua/Barbuda's footsteps.

If the US wants others to follow the rules and respect its copyrights, it will have to follow the rules itself.

Comment: Re:I don't suppose... (Score 1) 622

by sjames (#45242633) Attached to: Feds Confiscate Investigative Reporter's Confidential Files During Raid

If they wanted papers related to gun purchases they should have asked for them. In particular to give the judge a chance to carefully specify what papers they might have and what safeguards would separate out the other papers.

In other words, they had no legal purpose in taking or keeping those papers. They were obtained outside the scope of a warrant.

Note that even if the warrant covered papers related to gun ownership, handwritten notes about the TSA and air marshals would obviously not be included. They would have been required to return those immediately.

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Comment: Re:This is Ellsberg-Burglary Bad (Score 1) 622

by MarkvW (#45242631) Attached to: Feds Confiscate Investigative Reporter's Confidential Files During Raid

No fucking way is that plain view. First, it has to immediately be apparent that it is evidence, contraband, etc. The cop didn't have the slightest authority to lift up the file folder to see what was inside--because a GUN (all that was authorized to search for in the warrant) could NOT be inside the file folder.

This is SERIOUS bullshit.

Comment: Re:I donâ(TM)t suppose... (Score 1) 622

There is an assumption here that due process will be followed against those "guilty" of talking to journalists. That is naive. In US government agencies (whatever the written regulations or law might specify) only those specifically cleared to speak with the media are allowed to do so. Once it is known by the heads of those agencies that someone has broken this unwritten rule, they will get him, legal niceties be damned.

Comment: Re:Bragging about torture (Score 1) 390

by hairyfish (#45242623) Attached to: Citizen Eavesdrops On Former NSA Director Michael Hayden's Phone Call
Interesting timing on this comment. Here in Australia we have a newly elected conservative Prime Minister who is a Bush wannabe. In today's news it was reported that he held a private dinner for journalists but only Murdoch's employees were invited, and they no-one was allowed to talk about it. Murdoch is old and will die soon. I can't wait for that day.

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Comment: Re:Time to shut down the WTO (Score 2) 327

by cpt kangarooski (#45242619) Attached to: Antigua Looks Closer To Legal "Piracy" of US-Copyrighted Works

The Senate votes to modify or repeal it, and the President signs off. Same with any time the US does anything with a treaty.

Well, treaties are weird under US law. It could be that, it could require the involvement of the entire Congress (especially if there is enabling legislation), or it might even be something that the President can do unilaterally. Of course, it's probably a political question, so there wouldn't be a bright line rule.

Heisenberg may have been here.

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