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+ - 216 If you piss off the TSA, they will give your personal info to debt collectors->

Submitted by Jah-Wren Ryel
Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) writes "Not one single person detained by the TSA has ever been convicted on terrorism charges. So, in what appears to be a twisted attempt to stay relevant, they are getting into the debt collection business. According to this article at the NY Times, if you are even "accused of violating security regulations" they will hand over your personal information to debt collection agencies."
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+ - 289 Court Rules Probable-Cause Warrant Required for GPS Trackers->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "An appellate court has finally supplied an answer to an open question left dangling by the Supreme Court in 2012: Do law enforcement agencies need a probable-cause warrant to affix a GPS tracker to a target’s vehicle? The justices said the government’s statement “wags the dog rather vigorously,” noting that the primary reason for a search cannot be to generate evidence for law enforcement purposes. They also noted that “Generally speaking, a warrantless search is not rendered reasonable merely because probable cause existed that would have justified the issuance of a warrant.” The justices also rejected the government’s argument that obtaining a warrant would impede the ability of law enforcement to investigate crimes."
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+ - 209 Laser Communication System Sets Record with Data Transmissions from Moon ->

Submitted by sighted
sighted (851500) writes "NASA reports that it has used a pulsed laser beam to transmit data over the 384,633 kilometers (239,000 miles) between the Moon and the Earth at a download rate of 622 megabits per second. The transmissions took place between a ground station in New Mexico and the LADEE robotic spacecraft now orbiting the moon."
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+ - 215 TSA Doesn't Think Terrorists Are Plotting To Attack Airplanes-> 2

Submitted by Mikkeles
Mikkeles (698461) writes "Jonathan Corbett has been engaged in a lawsuit against the government concerning the constitutionality of scanners in the course of which, the TSA gave him classified documents. Thus he needed to file two copies of his brief: a public one with classified stuff redacted, and the full brief under seal. Someone over at Infowars noticed that apparently a clerk at the 11th Circuit appeals court forgot to file the document under seal, allowing them to find out what was under the redacts, including: "As of mid-2011, terrorist threat groups present in the Homeland are not known to be actively plotting against civil aviation targets or airports; instead, their focus is on fundraising, recruiting, and propagandizing.""
Link to Original Source

+ - 295 Tesla CEO Elon Musk: Fuel cells are 'so bullshit' ->

Submitted by Frosty Piss
Frosty Piss (770223) writes "Elon Musk is unafraid to speak his mind. Whether he's talking about other players in the electric vehicle space or sub-par reporting from The New York Times, this is a man with few filters. Musk ays that fuel cells are not part of the solution that electric vehicles offer for giving up the hydrocarbon addiction. After commenting that the only reason some automakers are pursuing hydrogen technology is for marketing purposes, that lithium batteries are superior mass and volume-wise for a given range, and that fuel cells are too expensive, Musk capped it all off with the safety issue. "Oh god, a fuel cell is so bullshit", Musk said. "Hydrogen is quite a dangerous gas. you know, it's suitable for the upper stage of rockets, but not for cars," he said."
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+ - 138 Netgear ReadyNAS Boxes Open to Remote Root Exploit

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "A popular NETGEAR network-attached storage product used primarily in medium-sized organizations has a gaping vulnerability that puts any data moving through a network in jeopardy.

The flaw in ReadyNAS, specifically its Frontview front end, was patched via a firmware update three months ago. But according to Tripwire researcher Craig Young who discovered the issue and reported it to NETGEAR, only a fraction of Internet-facing boxes have been patched. An attacker exploiting the vulnerability could gain root access to the box.

“There’s a lot of room for people to get burned on this,” Young told Threatpost. “I felt it is important to get the message out to people that if you’re running the RAIDiator firmware (prior to the current version) it’s easy to attack the system. As we’ve found with Microsoft patches, people reverse-engineer patches to find vulnerabilities. This is the type of thing that anyone could trivially compare this firmware to the previous and see in an instant where the vulnerability is.”"

+ - 178 Firefox's blocked-by-default Java isn't going down well->

Submitted by JG0LD
JG0LD (2616363) writes "The Firefox web browser will, henceforth, require users to manually activate Java objects on sites that they visit, Mozilla has confirmed. The change is aimed at improving security and moving away from a dependence on proprietary plug-ins, but critics say it will cause untold headaches for developers, admins and less-technical end-users."
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+ - 185 A look inside the 8K theater technology at the newly renovated Fiske Planetarium 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Sky gazers at CU-Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium ( http://fiske.colorado.edu/beta/ ) are getting better, clearer and deeper views. And not just of astronomy anymore.

The planetarium has been upgraded, transforming it into a digital IMAX-like theater (thread: http://np.reddit.com/r/space/comments/1owy12/a_look_inside_the_8k_theater_technology_at_the/ images: http://imgur.com/a/0vaj8 ) that’s open to the public every Saturday and Sunday with a variety of programs including shows for children. In addition to space odysseys and laser shows — longtime favorites of audiences — movies are now part of the Fiske lineup( http://www.boulderijournal.com/article.php?id=9779 http://connections.cu.edu/across-cu/modernized-fiske-planetarium-reopens/ ).

“Just like at an IMAX theater, we can take you near a black hole, through the Grand Canyon, under the ocean, or up to a super volcano,” said Doug Duncan, director of Fiske. “The sky is no longer the limit.” (http://www.colorado.edu/news/features/modernized-fiske-takes-viewers-through-universe-high-definition)"

+ - 184 Google Wants to Help You Tiptoe Around the NSA & The Great Firewall of China

Submitted by Kyle Jacoby
Kyle Jacoby (2973265) writes "The NSA was right when it postulated that the mere knowledge of the existence of their program could weaken its ability to function. Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), which serve to mask the source and destination of data by routing it through a 3rd party server, have been a popular method for maintaining internet anonymity for the paranoid and prudent. However, the all-but-silent fall of secure email server Lavabit, and VPN provider CryptoSeal, have shown us just how pervasive the government's eye on our communications is. These companies chose to fold rather than to divulge customer data entrusted to them, which begs the million-dollar question: how many have chosen to remain open and silently hand over the keys to your data?

Google has decided to put the private back in VPN by supporting uProxy, a project developed at the University of Washington with help from Brave New Software. Still using a VPN schema, their aim is to keep the VPN amongst friends (literally). Of course, you'll need a friend who is willing to let you route your net through their tubes. Their simple integration into Firefox and Chrome will lower the barrier creating a decentralized VPN architecture would make sweeping pen register orders more difficult, and would also make blocking VPNs a rather difficult task for countries like China, who block citizens' access to numerous websites.

On a related note, when will the public finally demand that communications which pass through a third party, encrypted, still retain an reasonable expectation of privacy (rendering them pen register order-resistant)?"

+ - 218 Exoplanet Count Blasts Through the 1,000 Barrier->

Submitted by astroengine
astroengine (1577233) writes "The first 1,000 exoplanets to be confirmed have been added to the Europe-based Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. For the last few weeks, astronomers (and the science media) have been waiting with bated breath as the confirmed exoplanet count tallied closer and closer to the 1,000 mark. Then, with the help of the Super Wide Angle Search for Planets (SuperWASP) collaboration, the number jumped from 999 to 1,010 overnight. All of the 11 worlds are classified as "hot-Jupiters" with orbital periods from less than 2 days to 8 days."
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+ - 192 Bell Canada to Collect User Data for Advertising->

Submitted by beerdragoon
beerdragoon (1142579) writes "One of Canada's biggest mobile and TV providers will soon begin collecting detailed information on usage patterns of its subscribers. Starting November 16th, Bell plans on using this information to provide targeted ads for subscribers. According to Bell this policy will allow customers 'to receive Internet advertising that's relevant to them rather than the random online advertising they're receiving now.' Customers have until the 16th to opt out of the targeted ads, but there doesn't appear to be a way to opt out of the data collection. Apparently this is not illegal, but it is certainly considered unethical by many."
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+ - 200 Wikipedia and the War on Sockpuppets->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Wikipedia editors are actively engaged in a wide-ranging battle against PR firms attempting to edit the crowdsourced encyclopedia’s entries to reflect their clients’ best interests. Over the past couple weeks, those Wikipedia editors have isolated several hundred user accounts linked to people “paid to write articles on Wikipedia promoting organizations or products,” according to Sue Gardner, executive director of the Wikimedia Foundation, which oversees Wikipedia’s operations. Those users’ accounts violate Wikipedia’s guidelines, “including prohibitions against sockpuppetry and undisclosed conflicts of interest.” Some 250 suspicious user accounts have already been nuked. Correcting biased text is a thankless job for those Wikipedia editors—the literary-world equivalent of killing endless hordes of zombies approaching your protective fence. But that job gets even harder when a PR agency deploys dozens, or even hundreds of writers to systematically adjust clients’ Wikipedia pages. While Gardner didn’t mention the names of such agencies in her statement, The Daily Dot cited a firm named Wiki-PR that brags on its Website about its skill in building client-friendly Wikipedia pages. “We build, manage and translate Wikipedia pages for over 12,000 people and companies,” is one of its advertising slogans. Other services include “crisis editing” and “concept development.” Wiki-PR has not yet responded to Slashdot’s request for comment, and the firm’s Twitter page is now locked. And therein lies the downside of crowdsourcing: it’s great to have a million people building something for you, but not all those hands and minds are necessarily working in your actual best interest. Whether or not Wiki-PR sticks around, other PR firms are surely doing their best to change online history."
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+ - 145 The Xbox One Also Won't Support Legacy Headsets At Launch->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Last week we learned that, at launch, USB headsets that work with the PS3 won't work with the PS4 — and the news is worse for Bluetooth headsets, which have no planned update. Now comes word that Xbox 360 owners planning to upgrade to the Xbox One will have a similar problem. While Microsoft is planning to sell an adapter that will allow third-party headsets to work with the Xbox One, it won't be available at launch."
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+ - 159 Gold in Trees May Hint at Buried Treasure-> 1

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Money may not grow on trees, but gold does—or at least it accumulates inside of them. Scientists have found that trees growing over deeply buried deposits of gold ore sport leaves with higher-than-normal concentrations of the glittering element. The finding provides an inexpensive, excavation-free way to narrow the search for ore deposits."
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+ - 209 Tesla Underground: Model S Owners Jump Through Hoops to Skirt Wacky Texas Rules-> 1

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy (2660665) writes "Texas is known for having the nation's most draconian anti-Tesla rules, based on intense and cash-rich lobbying and political donations by Texas car dealers. What's amazing is what would-be Tesla owners still have to do to get their hands on--and maintain--a Tesla Model S. How do you buy a car the laws try to stop you from owning? By jumping through wacky hoops, it turns out. Tesla store staff, for example, can't tell visitors how much a Model S costs. They can't give test drives, and they can't discuss financing options. Tesla service centers are banned from showing the company logo--or advertising that they do Tesla warranty work or service at all. So how have 1,000 Model S cars been sold? That would be sheer persistence."
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+ - 263 Call Yourself A Hacker, Lose Your 4th Amendment Rights->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "As described on the DigitalBond blog, a security researcher was subjected to a court ordered search in which a lack of pre-notification was premised on his self description as a "hacker". From the court order, "The tipping point for the Court comes from evidence that the defendants – in their own words – are hackers. By labeling themselves this way, they have essentially announced that they have the necessary computer skills and intent to simultaneously release the code publicly and conceal their role in that act. ""
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+ - 206 Review: Ubuntu Touch on a Nexus 7 is almost awesome

Submitted by colinneagle
colinneagle (2544914) writes "I installed Ubuntu Touch "1.0" on my first-generation Nexus 7 tablet and have been using it as my main tablet system for the last four days. Here's how it went. First off, the installation was surprisingly painless. I followed the official instructions and didn't encounter a single problem. That being said, the installation is really geared toward software developers, power users or people already comfortable on a Linux command line. If you're not in one of those categories, I recommend holding off for the time being. Once installed, Ubuntu Touch booted up rather quickly — in only just a few seconds (a fair bit faster than Android 4.x on the same tablet). And, immediately, I was presented with a short tutorial that appears the first time the system is booted, which, I might add, has got to be one of the slickest, least annoying tutorials I've seen.

But... there were problems. The battery life was, to put it mildly, terrible. Performance has been mixed, and the OS was prone to what I call "The Pulsating Seizure Feature" a few dozen times over the weekend. In a nutshell: launching apps (and, occasionally, moving between apps) can cause the device to freeze and begin flashing the screen rapidly.

The full review can be read here."

+ - 193 Hypothetical: Can Bruce Schneier be Trusted 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Security guru Bruce Schneier is, among other things, a world renowned cryptography expert, author of several popular books, and a second-order internet meme. He is also an outspoken critic of the NSA, in particular the massive NSA surveillance programs disclosed over the summer by Edward Snowden. Schneier has been involved in reviewing the leaked documents and has put in effort to determine which cryptosystems should still be considered safe. I'm a big fan of Bruce Schneier, but just to play devil's advocate, let's say, hypothetically, that Schneier is actually in cahoots with the NSA. Who better to reinstate public trust in weakened cryptosystems? As an exercise in security that Schneier himself may find interesting, what methods are available for proving (or at least affirming) that we can trust Bruce Schneier?"

+ - 207 TSA airport screenings now start before you arrive at the airport->

Submitted by Bob the Super Hamste
Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) writes "The New York Times is reporting that the TSA is now doing background investigations on passengers before they arrive at the airport. The publicly stated reason for this is that it is to streamline the security procedures at airports allowing more passengers to receive less scrutiny while at the air port but this new authority allows the TSA additional information about each traveler. The prescreening that is being performed for domestic travel now uses a simiar standard to that of foreign individuals who where entering the US. The new measures go beyond what is used in the Secure Flight program and while light on details mentions that the passengers passport number will be used. The article does however point out the data sources that are available to the TSA to conduct these pre-screening with such as tax identification number, past travel itineraries, property records, physical characteristics, and law enforcement or intelligence information. Also mentioned is that individuals who do not have a passport will not be subjected to the rules and from my reading will not be eligible for lesser screening at that airport. The stated goal of this program is to have 25% of all airline passengers in the US receive lighter screening at the airport so that they don't have to take their shoes off, remove jackets, or remove laptops from bags. Additionally passengers who are in higher risk categories can receive additional screenings. Also mentioned is that all passengers are currently prescreened and that airlines are required to share your passport data with the TSA if they have it."
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+ - 286 PM calls Facebook irresponsible for allowing beheading clips-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "David Cameron has attacked Facebook as irresponsible for lifting a ban on videos of beheadings being posted on its site.

The prime minister said the social network must explain its decision to allow images showing decapitations to worried parents.

Facebook has said users should be free to view such videos and then condemn the content.

Cameron wrote on Twitter: "It's irresponsible of Facebook to post beheading videos, especially without a warning. They must explain their actions to worried parents."

Facebook introduced a temporary ban on such videos in May but has since decided to remove the block on the grounds that the site is used to share information about world events, such as acts of terrorism and human rights abuses."

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+ - 217 USB Implementers Forum Will Not Play Nice With Open Hardware

Submitted by DeathToBill
DeathToBill (601486) writes "Hack A Day reports on the attempts of open hardware hackers to obtain a vendor and product ID for their devices to be able to sell them as USB compliant: "A not for profit foundation [in this case Arachnid Labs] could buy a VID, give PIDs away to foundation members making open source hardware, and we would all live in a magical world of homebrew devices that are certified as USB compliant." The USB Implementers Forum, which controls the sale of PIDs, has lawyered up, responding to the effort with a cease and desist notice, requiring Arachnid Labs to stop "raising funds to purchase a unique USB VID" and "delete all references to the USB-IF, VIDs and PIDs for transfer, resale or sublicense from your website and other marketing materials." A slight over-reaction? Or dark conspiracy against open hardware? You decide!"

+ - 138 Security experts release 'safest browser available'->

Submitted by mask.of.sanity
mask.of.sanity (1228908) writes "Security testers have released an internally-developed web browser they say is more secure and offers better privacy than the dominant offerings.

The OS X Aviator browser Chromium-based browser blocked online advertisements, cookies and cleared caches with the in-built Disconnect extension to prevent exposure to malvertising, and enforced click-to-play for Flash and Java.

It received criticism from security experts because its beta release was closed source."

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+ - 224 Company to Balloon Tourists to the Edge of Space for $75,000->

Submitted by astroengine
astroengine (1577233) writes "If the thought of a rocket ride to space — or the $250,000 price tag to get there — leaves you feeling queasy, an Arizona firm thinks it has a gentler, less expensive alternative. World View, an offshoot of privately owned Paragon Space Development Corp., is developing a balloon-launched, near-space (30 kilometers) ride for $75,000 — less than one-third the current cost to fly on Virgin Galactic's suborbital SpaceShipTwo. “It really is very gentle. You can be up at altitude for hours, for days for research if you need to be... I think we have the opportunity to give a really, really incredible experience to people — and for a lot less than most of what’s out on the market right now,” project co-founder and Paragon president Jane Poynter told Discovery News."
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