+ - 198 Japanese artist makes better art in Execl than others can do with Photoshop-> 3

Submitted by cute_orc
cute_orc writes: MS Excel is notorious for being a boring spreadsheet applications. But 73 years old Japanese artist Tatsuo Horiuchi makes amazing art using autoshape tool of Excel. He makes free-form shapes spanning multiple cells and join them together in into a huge image. His artwork is really amazing and beautiful.
Link to Original Source

+ - 147 HFT nothing to worry about (at least in Australia)->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: Although software-driven high-frequency trading has got a pretty bad rap (being blamed for the so-called 'Flash Crash' in 2012 for example) Australia's chief financial regulator ASIC says that, in Australia at least, it's not cause for concern. After an in-depth study of HFT in Australian markets, ASIC decided to hold off on previously considered regulatory changes (such as implementing a 'pause' for some small trades).
Link to Original Source

+ - 97 Proposal for a New Periodic Table of the Elements-> 3

Submitted by ramorim
ramorim writes: In honor of the Chemist Day, celebrated in Brazil on this day June 18, 2013, I publish a proposal for a new Periodic Table of Elements in a modular spiral-hexagonal model, with continuity and connectivity for all constituent units of the matter. This proposal indeed permits to extrapolate the hypothetical elements of the G-block and H-block in the same model.
Link to Original Source

+ - 116 Lobster, a new game programming language, now available as Open Source

Submitted by Aardappel
Aardappel writes: Lobster ( http://strlen.com/lobster ) is a new programming language targeting game programming specifically, building on top of OpenGL, SDL 2 and FreeType. The language looks superficially similar to Python, but is its own blend of fun features. Open Source (ZLIB license) and available on GitHub ( https://github.com/aardappel/lobster ).

+ - 175 TiVo Series 5 coming this fall->

Submitted by WebGangsta
WebGangsta writes: The rumor mill continues to grow closer and closer to reality, as The Verge is reporting the upcoming SERIES 5 TiVo will have 6 tuners, support OTA recording (an old TiVo feature being brought back), storage beyond the 2TB limit, and more.

While some would say that TiVo today is nothing more than a Patent Holder (albeit a successful one), there's still a market for a cable box that doubles as a streaming player. Is hardware the future of TiVo, or should they go and just license their software to all? And don't get us started on those "TiVo Buying Hulu" or "Apple/Google buying TiVo" rumors... that's a different Slashdot story for a different day,.

Link to Original Source

+ - 183 Intel Announces New Enterprise Xeons, More Powerful Xeon Phi Cards->

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid writes: Intel announced a set of new enterprise products today aimed at furthering its strengths in the TOP500 supercomputing market. As of today, the Chinese Tiahne-2 supercomputer (aka Milky Way 2) is now the fastest supercomputer on the planet at roughly ~54PFLOPs. Intel is putting its own major push behind heterogeneous computing with the Tianhe-2. Each node contains two Ivy Bridge sockets and three Xeon Phi cards. Each node, therefore, contains 422.4GFLOP/s in Ivy Bridge performance — but 3.43TFLOPs/s worth of Xeon Phi. In addition, we'll see new Xeons based on this technology later this year, in the 22nm E5-2600 V2 family, with up to 12 cores. The new chips will be built on Ivy Bridge technology and will offer up to 12 cores / 24 threads. The new Xeons, however, aren't really the interesting part of the story. Today, Intel is adding cards to the current Xeon Phi lineup — the 7120P, 3120P, 3120A, and 5120D. The 3120P and 3120A are the same card — the "P" is passively cooled, while the "A" integrates a fan. Both of these solutions have 57 CPUs and 6GB of RAM. Intel states that they offer ~1TFLOP of performance, which puts them on par with the 5110P that launched last year, but with slightly less memory and presumably a lower price point. At the top of the line, Intel is introducing the 7120P and 7120X — the 7120P comes with an integrated heat spreader, the 7120X doesn't. Clock speeds are higher on this card, it has 61 cores instead of 60, 16GB of GDDR5, and 352GBps of memory bandwidth. Customers who need lots of cores and not much RAM can opt for one of the cheaper 3100 cards, while the 7100 family allows for much greater data sets.
Link to Original Source

+ - 94 Fast and Furious Developer Job Market 2

Submitted by datavirtue
datavirtue writes: Hello fellow Slashdot'ers. I've just entered the job market (this last month) and have been mostly using Dice.com with a smattering of CraigsList. I feel like I'm getting attacked! The question I pose is this: How do you deal with getting a job when you already have one? The recruiters literally ring my phone off the hook like a psycho girlfriend and I now spend more time on the phone, answering emails, and in interviews than I do actually working. My paid time off is starting to run out and people are getting suspicious, and I have just started looking! Please help, I need advice.
As a side note, I ran a job posting on CraigsList to get resumes and cover letters from other people looking for similar jobs and all I have gotten is almost a complete failure of applicants to submit cover letters--and the ones who did had a string of developer jobs where they lasted only a year or less. Is this the norm?

+ - 146 Scores of vulnerable SAP deployments uncovered->

Submitted by mask.of.sanity
mask.of.sanity writes: Hundreds of organisations have been detected running dangerously vulnerable versions of SAP that were more than seven years old and thousands more have placed their critical data at risk by exposing SAP applications to the public internet.

The new research found the SAP services were inadvertently made accessible thanks to a common misconception that SAP systems were not publicly-facing and remotely-accessible. The SAP services contained dangerous vulnerabilities which were since patched by the vendor but had not been applied.

Link to Original Source

+ - 158 Cerulean Studios releases IMPP specifications

Submitted by Runefox
Runefox writes: Cerulean Studios, the company behind the long-lived Trillian instant messaging client, has released preliminary specifications to their proprietary "Astra" protocol, now named IMPP (Instant Messaging and Presence Protocol), which provides continuous client functionality as well as mandatory TLS encryption for clients. According to their blog, Cerulean Studios' motivation for the release is to promote interoperability among the throngs of IM services and clients available by allowing others to also use the protocol. Future concepts include federation with XMPP.

While the documentation is in an early state and the protocol is claimed to still be in development, it is hoped that it will help decentralize the very heavily fragmented messaging ecosystem. It's implied that, in turn, greater options for privacy may become available in the wake of the PRISM scandal via privately-run federated servers, unaffiliated with major networks, yet still able to communicate with them.

+ - 208 Supreme Court Decides Your Silence May Be Used Against You->

Submitted by crackspackle
crackspackle writes: The Supreme Court ruled in favor of the State of Texas earlier today in a murder trial where the defendant whom prior to be taken into custody, had been questioned by the police and choose to remain silent on key questions, This fact was bought up at trial and used to convict him. Most of us have seen at least enough cop shows to know police must read a suspect their Miranda rights when placing them in custody. The issue was a bit murkier here in that the defendant had not yet been detained and while we all probably thought the freedom from self-incrimination was an implicit right as stated in the Constitution, apparently SCOTUS now thinks you have to claim that right or at least be properly mirandized first.
Link to Original Source

+ - 146 Trying to Learn a Foreign Language? Avoid Reminders of Home->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit writes: Show a native-born Chinese person a picture of the Great Wall, and suddenly they'll have trouble speaking English, even if they usually speak it fluently. That's the conclusion of a new study, which finds that reminders of our home country can complicate our ability to speak a new language. The findings could help explain why cultural immersion is the most effective way to learn a foreign tongue and why immigrants who settle within an ethnic enclave acculturate more slowly than those who surround themselves with friends from their new country.
Link to Original Source

+ - 228 Snowden kills "metadata" argument during live hosted by The Guardian

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: In a live chat hosted by the The Guardian, Edward Snowden has clarified that the NSA does not simply have access to metadata, as has been the media rhetoric, and that large volumes of data relating to US citizens is frequently ingested.

Answering one question, he wrote:

If I target for example an email address, for example under FAA 702, and that email address sent something to you, Joe America, the analyst gets it. All of it. IPs, raw data, content, headers, attachments, everything. And it gets saved for a very long time — and can be extended further with waivers rather than warrants.

Answering another:

US Persons do enjoy limited policy protections (and again, it's important to understand that policy protection is no protection — policy is a one-way ratchet that only loosens) and one very weak technical protection — a near-the-front-end filter at our ingestion points. The filter is constantly out of date, is set at what is euphemistically referred to as the "widest allowable aperture," and can be stripped out at any time. Even with the filter, US comms get ingested, and even more so as soon as they leave the border.

+ - 152 Google Adds Its VP9 Video Codec To Chromium Ahead Of Chrome And YouTube

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: Last month, Google revealed that it was planning to finish defining its VP9 video codec on June 17 (today), after which it will start using the next-generation compression technology in Chrome and on YouTube. The company is wasting no time: it has already enabled the free video compression standard by default in the latest Chromium build.

+ - 143 How to Turn Your Cell Phone Into a Dolphin->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit writes: In a few years, an iPhone app may give you a 3D layout of a room as soon as you step into it. Researchers have developed an algorithm that spits out the shape and countours of complex structures (including Switzerland's Lausanne Cathedral) using data compiled from four randomly placed microphones. The technology, which relies on the same sort of echolocation bats and dolphins use to navigate, could be used to develop more realistic echoes in video games and virtual reality simulations and to eliminate the echo from phone calls.
Link to Original Source

+ - 212 TSA agent tells 15 year-old girl: "Cover Up!"

Submitted by AdamnSelene
AdamnSelene writes: The daughter of Mark Frauenfelder, a founder of the website Boing Boing, was 'shamed' and 'humiliated' by a LAX Transportation Security Agency (TSA) officer who told her to 'cover up'. Frauenfelder detailed the story of his daughter’s experience with the TSA yesterday evening. The TSA is investigating the incident.

There is additional commentary on women's rights activist Maureen Herman's blog.

And we thought the TSA agents and scanning machines were there to grope and ogle fliers...

+ - 144 Geologists Discover New 'Embryonic' Subduction Zone: America and Europe Collide

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: Our planet Earth is constantly changing. Continents shift and move across oceans as the plates continuously flow beneath one another. Now, scientists have discovered a new subduction zone forming off of the coast of Portugal. The new findings heralds the beginnings of a cycle that will eventually see the Atlantic Ocean close as continental Europe moves closer to America.

+ - 142 High Tech STEAM Carnival Aims To Entertain, Inspire, And Educate->

Submitted by kkleiner
kkleiner writes: A self-described think tank of engineers and inventors called Two Bit Circus have completed a successful crowdfunding campaign to launch a high tech reinvention of carnivals form yesteryear. The campaign raised over $100k to launch the STEAM Carnival (as in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) to take place in Los Angeles and San Francisco next year. Showcasing robots, fire, and lasers, the goal of the carnival is to inspire young people into science and technology through these entertaining and educational events.
Link to Original Source

+ - 102 China Bumps U.S. Out of First Place for Fastest Supercomptuer

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: China's Tianhe-2 is the world's fastest supercomputer, according to the latest semiannual Top 500 list of the 500 most powerful computer systems in the world. Developed by China's National University of Defense Technology, the system appeared two years ahead of schedule and will be deployed at the National Supercomputer Center in Guangzho, China, before the end of the year.

+ - 218 State Photo-ID databases Mined By Police

Submitted by Rick Zeman
Rick Zeman writes: Showing once again that once a privacy door is opened every law enforcement agency will run through it, The Washington Post details how state drivers license photo databases are being mined by various LEOs in their states--and out. From the article: "[L]aw enforcement use of such facial searches is blurring the traditional boundaries between criminal and non-criminal databases, putting images of people never arrested in what amount to perpetual digital lineups. The most advanced systems allow police to run searches from laptop computers in their patrol cars and offer access to the FBI and other federal authorities.

Such open access has caused a backlash in some of the few states where there has been a public debate. As the databases grow larger and increasingly connected across jurisdictional boundaries, critics warn that authorities are developing what amounts to a national identification system — based on the distinct geography of each human face."

+ - 256 How to block the NSA from your friends list->

Submitted by Atticus Rex
Atticus Rex writes: The fact that our social networking services are so centralized is a big part of why they fall so easily to government surveillance. It only takes a handful of amoral Zuckerbergs to hand over hundreds of millions of people's data to PRISM.

That's why this Slate article makes the case for a mass migration to decentralized, free software social networks, which are much more robust to spying and interference. On top of that, these systems respect your freedom as a software user (or developer), and they're less likely to pepper you with obnoxious advertisements.

Link to Original Source

+ - 193 Can Red Hat do for OpenStack what it did for Linux? ->

Submitted by Brandon Butler
Brandon Butler writes: Red Hat made its first $1 billion commercializing Linux. Now, it hopes to make even more doing the same for OpenStack.

Red Hat executives say OpenStack – the open source cloud computing platform – is just like Linux. The code just needs to be massaged into a commercially-hardened package before enterprises will really use it. But just because Red Hat successfully commercialized Linux does not guarantee its OpenStack effort will go as well.

Proponents say businesses will trust Red Hat as an OpenStack distrbution company because of its work in the Linux world. But others say building a private cloud takes a lot more than just throwing some code on top of a RHEL OS.

Link to Original Source

+ - 149 Ocean Plastics Host Surprising Microbial Array->

Submitted by MTorrice
MTorrice writes: A surprising suite of microbial species colonizes plastic waste floating in the ocean, according to a new study. The bacteria appeared to burrow pits into the plastic. One possible explanation is that bacteria eat into the polymers, weakening the pieces enough to cause them to break down more quickly and eventually sink to the sea floor. While the microbes could speed the plastic’s decay, they might also cause their own ecological problems, the researchers say.
Link to Original Source

+ - 223 Teen's biofuel invention turns algae into fuel->

Submitted by Lasrick
Lasrick writes: This is great; she won a trip to Jet Propulsion Lab for her invention: 'For a fifth-grade science fair, Evie Sobczak found that the acid in fruit could power clocks; she connected a cut-up orange to a clock with wire and watched it tick. In seventh grade, she generated power by engineering paddles that could harness wind. And in eighth grade, she started a project that eventually would become her passion: She wanted to grow algae and turn it into biofuel.'
Link to Original Source

+ - 215 UK town of Ipswich remodelled as Zelda level

Submitted by cyclomedia
cyclomedia writes: Switch Fringe is a relatively new not-for-profit annual music and arts festival in the UK town of Ipswich, and this year's programme features a full page map of the town with details about each venue. Unlike most other maps this one is in the form of a Zelda level. This is in part due to this year's theme "Reimagining Ipswich", that PixelH8 is coming out of semi-retirement to play a gig during the preceedings and possibly due to the fact that the map's designer — The Decibel Kid — spent too much time playing Zelda on a Gameboy Color during the first Web bubble.

+ - 100 Sunflowers Use Fibonacci Numbers->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit writes: The spiraling shapes in cauliflower, artichoke, and sunflower florets) share a remarkable feature: The numbers of clockwise and counterclockwise spirals are consecutive Fibonacci numbers—the sequence 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, and so on, so that each number is the sum of the last two. What's more, those spirals pack florets as tight as can be, maximizing their ability to gather sunlight for the plant. But how do plants like sunflowers create such perfect floret arrangements, and what does it have to do with Fibonacci numbers? A plant hormone called auxin, which spurs the growth of leaves, flowers, and other plant organs, is the key: Florets grow where auxin flows. Using a mathematical model that describes how auxin and certain proteins interact to transport each other around inside plants, researchers could predict where the hormone would accumulate. Simulations of that model reproduced patterns exactly matching real "Fibonacci spirals" in sunflowers. Based on their results, the researchers suggest that such patterns might be more universal in nature than previously thought.
Link to Original Source

+ - 104 DNA Fog Helps Identify Trespassers, Thieves, and Brigands->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula writes: Applied DNA Sciences (ADNAS) has developed a new approach to solve crimes using DNA tagging. The difference is that instead of tagging the objects being stolen, the company's system tags the perpetrator with DNA. While this has been tried before by applying the DNA to a fleeing criminal with a gun, ADNAS has adopted a more subtle approach.
Link to Original Source

+ - 101 Canadian Couple Charged $5k For Finding 400-Year-Old Skeleton->

Submitted by Rebecka Schumann
Rebecka Schumann writes: Ontario couple Ken Campbell and Nicole Sauve said a recent fence installation led them to discover what is being labeled a historical find. Sauve, who said the duo originally believed the skeleton to be from bones of an animal, called the Ontario Provincial Police to investigate; Forensic Anthropologist Michael Spence confirmed the bones were that of an aboriginal woman who died at age 24 between the late 1500s to the early 1600s.

In spite of reporting their find and Spence’s evaluation, Suave and Campbell were told they were required to hire an archeologist to assess their property at their own expense under Ontario’s Funeral, Burial and Cremation Services Act. The act, which requires evaluation for all properties found to house human remains, has the Canadian couple stuck with a 5,000 bill.

Link to Original Source

+ - 135 Comcast to expand public WiFi using home internet connections->

Submitted by Bob the Super Hamste
Bob the Super Hamste writes: The St. Paul Pioneer press is reporting that Comcast is planning on expanding its network of public WiFi hot spots in the Twin Cities area by using home internet connections and user's WiFi routers. Customers will be upgraded to new wireless routers that will have 2 wireless networks, one for the home users and one for the general public. Subscribers to Comcast's Xfinity service and customers that participate in the public WiFi program will be allowed free access to the public WiFi offered by this service. Non Comcast customers get 2 free sessions a month each lasting 1 hour with additional sessions costing money. The article mentions that a similar service already exists and is provided by the Spain-based company Fon.
Link to Original Source

+ - 119 Rep. Jerrold Nadler Does Not Think the NSA Can Listen to U.S. Phone Calls 1

Submitted by mozumder
mozumder writes: Sorry Slashdot, but your faith in your high-school dropout IT support Jesus is undermined once again, as the bombshell story on Rep. Jerrold Nadler was apparently false. Looks like he just misunderstood the initial briefing.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence released a statement on this as well, saying: "The statement that a single analyst can eavesdrop on domestic communications without proper legal authorization is incorrect and was not briefed to Congress. Members have been briefed on the implementation of Section 702, that it targets foreigners located overseas for a valid foreign intelligence purpose, and that it cannot be used to target Americans anywhere in the world."

It is now time to relearn everything about the NSA programs. Sometimes you actually do need more than a GED to understand systems designs.

+ - 236 Feeling suicidal, so get help on an MMO?

Submitted by An Ominous Cow Erred
An Ominous Cow Erred writes: In an odd approach to reaching out to otherwise shut-in sufferers of mental distress, an organization called Anxiety Gaming is betting that online intervention is the best way to reach people with emotional difficulties. Their argument is that the social nature of modern gaming makes it a valid means of reaching people who might not otherwise seek help through more traditional channels. According to their Facebook page, their future intentions seem to include distributing consoles to homes for foster youth, to encourage them to look to games for positival interpersonal communication.

With much media attention focused on cyberbullying and the negative affects of online social interaction, could gaming turn out to be a path to positive mental health as well?