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+ - 103 Modular robots that self-assemble, coordinate and take flight->

Submitted by Sabine Hauert
Sabine Hauert (2925227) writes "“The whole is greater than the sum of its parts” — a catch phrase that aptly expresses the Distributed Flight Array: a modular robot consisting of hexagonal-shaped single-rotor units that can take on just about any shape or form. Although each unit is capable of generating enough thrust to lift itself off the ground, on its own it is incapable of flight much like a helicopter cannot fly without its tail rotor. However, when joined together, these units evolve into a sophisticated multi-rotor system capable of coordinated flight and much more."
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+ - 157 Is Whitelisting Coming of Age?->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Kaspersky recently announced their Whitelist Security Approach. It is a whole new concept to make the functioning of the antivirus program much faster and better. Whitelist is basically a database that stores information about different programs and files. You can check whether a file is safe or not by just simply entering its checksum or uploading the file itself.

Once the information is stored on the global database, you don’t need to scan the files again and again, the antivirus program would automatically retrieve information from Whitelist database. You can be sure about your files before installing or taking the risk of running them.

If you are a developer, then you may want to submit your apps to Kaspersky Whitelist, so that your users can assure themselves about the security of your application and it would also give you the program usage data.

Does this alleviate the need for signatures?
Does this stop 0-day exploits quicker?"

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+ - 122 World's Smallest Dual-Core ARM Cortex-A9 Module?->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Variscite has unveiled what it claims is the world's tiniest Cortex-A9 system-on-module, measuring 52 x 17mm. The Linux- and Android-compatible DART-4460 board is based on a 1.5GHz dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, is available with up to 1GB of DDR2 RAM and 8GB eMMC flash, and can run at 400MHz on just 44mA. The module provides interfaces for display (HDMI, RGB, DSI), wireless (Bluetooth, WiFi), audio, camera, USB, and more, and it consumes as little as 5mA in suspend and 44mA while running from a 3.7V battery at 400 MHz, according to Variscite. And in case you were wondering, the iconic Gumstix form-factor is 12 percent larger, at 58 x 17mm."
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+ - 195 Red Hat confirms GNOME Classic Mode for RHEL 7

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The H-Online is reporting that the upcoming RHEL 7 will use GNOME Classic Mode over Gnome Shell as its Default Desktop GUI. Speaking to TechTarget ahead of the 2013 Red Hat Summit, Red Hat engineering director Denise Dumas said this regarding the decision: "I think it's been hard for the Gnome guys, because they really, really love modern mode, because that's where their hearts are." She added that the same team had "done a great job putting together classic mode" and that it was eventually decided to use it in favour of the more radical modern interface to spare customers the effort of relearning their way around the desktop again."

+ - 109 Apple revises warranty policies in Europe to comply with UE laws->

Submitted by ccguy
ccguy (1116865) writes "Apple revised its warranty policy in Italy last year after being hit with a €900,000 fine for not complying with an EU-mandated two-year term. The company has today revised the terms of its warranties in France, Germany and Belgium, specifying that customers are entitled to repairs and replacements of their Apple products for a full two years after purchase, and not just one as previously stated. No word yet on when the rest of the EU will see those changes, but it would now seem to be just a matter of time before other countries get the new terms as well."
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+ - 131 Crowd-Funded Radio Beacon Will Message Aliens->

Submitted by astroengine
astroengine (1577233) writes "In the hope of uniting people around the globe in a long-duration project to send a radio "message in a bottle" METI (Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence) signal, a crowd-funded project utilizing a refurbished radio telescope in California has begun its work. Lone Signal is a project initiated by scientists, businessmen and entrepreneurs to set up a continuous radio beacon from Earth. To support the operations of the Jamesburg Earth Station radio dish in Carmel Valley, Calif. (a dish built to support the Apollo 11 moon landing in 1969), a crowd-funding effort has been set up so that for a small fee, users can send images to the stars. If you're content with sending a text message, your first message is free. The radio dish's first target is Gliese 526, a red dwarf star 18 light-years from Earth, but the project will be considering other stellar targets believed to be harboring habitable worlds."
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+ - 95 Dmitry Itskov wants to help you live forever via an android avatar->

Submitted by trendspotter
trendspotter (2931603) writes "

If Russian billionaire Dmitry Itskov has his way, the human lifespan will soon no longer depend on the limitations of the human body. Itskov, a Russian tycoon and former media mogul, is the founder of the 2045 Project — a venture that seeks to replace flesh-and-blood bodies with robotic avatars, each one uploaded with the contents of a human brain. The goal: to extend human lives by hundreds or thousands of years, if not indefinitely.

"

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+ - 118 SSDs: New King of the Data Center?->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Flash storage is more common on mobile devices than data-center hardware, but that could soon change. The industry has seen increasing sales of solid-state drives (SSDs) as a replacement for traditional hard drives, according to IHS iSuppli Research. Nearly all of these have been sold for ultrabooks, laptops and other mobile devices that can benefit from a combination of low energy use and high-powered performance. Despite that, businesses have lagged the consumer market in adoption of SSDs, largely due to the format’s comparatively small size, high cost and the concerns of datacenter managers about long-term stability and comparatively high failure rates. But that’s changing quickly, according to market researchers IDC and Gartner: Datacenter- and enterprise-storage managers are buying SSDs in greater numbers for both server-attached storage and mainstream storage infrastructure, according to studies both research firms published in April. That doesn’t mean SSDs will oust hard drives and replace them directly in existing systems, but it does raise a question: are SSDs mature enough (and cheap enough) to support business-sized workloads? Or are they still best suited for laptops and mobile devices?"
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+ - 109 Selling a DeLorean for Bitcoin; transaction advice?

Submitted by X86Daddy
X86Daddy (446356) writes "I'm selling my DeLorean for Bitcoins. Any advice for conducting large, live transactions like this? I've read about the Porsche sale from April, and my current plan is to simply use the Android Bitcoin app to ask for payment, and take the buyer to lunch while waiting for 6 confirmations, at which point I sign over the title. Anyone have other ideas or considerations for something like this?"

+ - 200 New Bill Would Declassify FISC Opinions

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "A group of eight senators from both parties have introduced a new bill that would require the attorney general to declassify as many of the rulings of the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court as possible as a way of bringing into the sunlight much of the law and opinion that guides the government’s surveillance efforts.

The bill comes in the aftermath of the National Security Agency leak scandal that revealed some pieces of the agency’s massive domestic surveillance program, including the collection of call data on millions of Verizon customers. The leaks also revealed the existence of a program called PRISM through which the NSA gets data on users from companies such as Google, Yahoo, Apple and Microsoft. Some of the key sponsors of the bill, including Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), have been vocal critics of the extent of government surveillance as well as the secrecy surrounding its interpretations of the Patriot Act.

Under the terms of the proposed law, the Justice Department would be required to declassify major FISC opinions as a way to give Americans a view into how the federal government is using the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act and Patriot Act. If the attorney general determines that a specific ruling can’t be declassified without endangering national security, he can declassify a summary of it. If even that isn’t possible, then the AG would need to explain specifically why the opinion needs to be kept secret."

+ - 104 Brain Can't Text While Driving Even With Hands Free->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "Using voice commands to send text messages and emails from behind the wheel, which is marketed as a safer alternative for drivers, actually is more distracting and dangerous than simply talking on a cellphone, a new AAA study found.

Texting a friend verbally while behind the wheel caused a “large” amount of mental distraction compared with “moderate/significant” for holding a phone conversation or talking with a passenger and “small” when listening to music or an audio book, the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found in a report released today.

Automakers have promoted voice-based messaging as a safer alternative to taking hands off the wheel to place a call and talk on a handheld phone. About 9 million infotainment systems will be shipped this year in cars sold worldwide, with that number projected to rise to more than 62 million by 2018, according to a March report by London-based ABI Research.

“As we push towards these hands-free systems, we may be solving one problem while creating another,” said Joel Cooper, a University of Utah assistant research professor who worked on the study. “Tread lightly. There’s a lot of rush to develop these systems.”

The findings from the largest U.S. motorist group bolster National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman’s call to ban all phone conversations behind the wheel, even with hands-free devices."

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+ - 188 Will Fear of Spying Drive Us to the Dark Side of the Web?->

Submitted by DavidGilbert99
DavidGilbert99 (2607235) writes "Prism and the NSA spying scandal has made a lot of people jittery about what they do online. Who is watching them and what are they doing with the information they steal? In a paranoid world like this, many people could begin to consider the deep web as a way of anonymising their online activities, but as David Gilbert says in IBTimes UK, the dark internet is not a place for the faint-hearted"
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+ - 172 Federal judge says interns should be paid

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Student interns are typically relegated to menial tasks like fetching coffee and taking out the trash, the idea being that they get paid in experience instead of money. On Tuesday, Manhattan Federal District Court Judge William H. Pauley disagreed, ruling in favor of two interns who sued Fox Searchlight Pictures to be paid for their work on the 2010 film Black Swan. The interns did chores that otherwise would have been performed by paid employees. Pauley ruled, in accordance with criteria laid out by the U.S. Department of Labor, that unpaid internships should be educational in nature and specifically structured to the benefit of the intern, and reasoned that if interns are going to do grunt work like regular employees, then they should be paid like regular employees."

+ - 101 Your license is your interface->

Submitted by dp619
dp619 (893918) writes "License free software has become a thing. Only 14.9% of repositories on GitHub have a license, according to recent Software Freedom Law Center research. Red Monk has observed that this trend is occurring principally among younger software developers. Outercurve Foundation technical evangelist Eric Schultz has offered up his opinion, saying, "As an active developer I want to add a slightly different perspective on the dangers of releasing unlicensed software. My perspective is based on a simple phrase: "Your License Is Your Interface." He adds, "A license similarly defines the interaction between the software, or more precisely the creators of the software, and users. Just like an interface, a license defines intended behavior of users of the software, such as the four essential freedoms or the ten pillars of the Open Source Definition. Just like an interface, a license prevents unintended behavior of users of the software, which depending on the open source license, may disclaim the original author of liability for use of the software, prohibit redistribution without recognizing the original author or prohibit distribution of derivatives under a more restrictive license. When it comes to legal use and distribution of your software, your license IS your interface.""
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+ - 115 Music firms secure orders blocking access to Pirate Bay in Ireland->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "UPC, Imagine, Vodafone, Digiweb, Hutchison 3G Ltd and Telefonica O2 Ireland Ltd all now have to block the Pirate Bay in Ireland. Eircom is already doing this at current. Mr Justice Brian McGovern made the decision based on changes to the current laws. Apparently the music firms were not happy about the Pirate Bay's advertising revenue generated annually being about $36 million! Willie Kavanagh is one of the muppet's who came up with this figure!"
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+ - 189 NSA Whistleblower Break Cover in Hong Kong->

Submitted by DavidGilbert99
DavidGilbert99 (2607235) writes "Edward Snowden, the ex-NSA employee who leaked the Prism files last week has stuck his head above water having gone into hiding on Monday, saying he is "neither traitor nor hear. I'm an American." Speaking to the South China Morning Post he said he chose Hong Kong as his base not to "hide from justice" but to "reveal criminality""
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+ - 216 Snowden's Big Truth: We Are All Less Free->

Submitted by chicksdaddy
chicksdaddy (814965) writes "In the days since stories based on classified information leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden hit the headlines, a string of reports and editorials claim that he had his facts wrong, accuse him of treason – or both. Others have accused journalists like Glen Greenwald of The Guardian of rushing to print before they had all the facts.

All of these criticisms could be valid. Technology firms may not have given intelligence agencies unfettered and unchecked access to their users' data. Edward Snowden may be, as the New York Times's David Brooks suggests, one of those 20-something-men leading a "life unshaped by the mediating institutions of civil society." All those critiques may be true without undermining the larger truth of Snowden's revelation: in an age of global, networked communications and interactions, we are all a lot less free than we thought we were.

I say this because nobody has seriously challenged the basic truth of Snowden's leak: that many of the world's leading telecommunications and technology firms are regularly divulging information about their users' activities and communications to law enforcement and intelligence agencies based on warrantless requests and court reviews that are hidden from public scrutiny.

It hasn't always been so. In 1877, the U.S. Supreme Court, weighing the government's ability to inspect the content of letters sent via the postal service, found that "No law of Congress can place in the hands of officials connected with the postal service any authority to invade the secrecy of letters and such sealed packages in the mail; and all regulations adopted as to mail matter of this kind must be in subordination to the great principle embodied in the fourth amendment of the Constitution." That's why all of us understand that exercising the convenience of dropping a letter in the corner post office box doesn't mean that we also consent to the government ripping open that letter and read its contents.

Sadly, we've been steadily conditioned to think differently about our electronic communications. We've been asked by both private sector firms and our government to accept a false choice: that there must be some bargain – a tradeoff between privacy and convenience."

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+ - 126 To Hack Back Or Not To Hack Back?->

Submitted by dinscott
dinscott (1951608) writes "If you think of cyberspace as a resource for you and your organization, it makes sense to protect your part of it as best you can. You build your defenses and train employees to recognize attacks, and you accept the fact that your government is the one that will pursue and prosecute those who try to hack you.

But the challenge arises when you (possibly rightfully so) perceive that your government is not able do so, and you demand to be allowed to “hack back”."

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+ - 163 KDE Plasma Can Now Run On Wayland->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "With the upcoming KDE 4.11, there's an initial Wayland backend through the KWin manager. The developer behind the code notes on his blog: "Once the system is fully started you can just use it. If everything works fine, you should not even notice any difference, though there are still limitations, like only the three mouse buttons of my touchpad are supported ;-)""
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+ - 138 German Parliament tells government to strictly limit patents on software->

Submitted by jrepin
jrepin (667425) writes "On Friday the 7th of June the German Parliament decided upon a joint motion to limit software patents. The Parliament urges the German Government to take steps to limit the granting of patents on computer programs. Software should exclusively be covered by copyright, and the rights of the copyright holders should not be devalued by third parties' software patents. The only exception where patents should be allowed are computer programs which replace a mechanical or electromagnetic component. In addition the Parliament made clear that governmental actions related to patents must never interfere with the legality of distributing Free Software."
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+ - 235 Computer memory can be read with a flash of light->

Submitted by ananyo
ananyo (2519492) writes "A new kind of computer memory can be read 10,000 times faster than flash memory using pulses of light, taking advantage of principles used in solar panel design. Researchers built the prototype device using bismuth ferrite. In conventional computer memory, information is stored in cells that hold different amounts of electric charge, each representing a binary '1' or '0'. Bismuth ferrite, by contrast, and can represent those binary digits, or bits, as one of two polarization states, and, because of its photovoltaic properties, can switch between these states in response to visible light."
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+ - 152 Irish SOPA used to block Pirate Bay Access. ISPs roll over.

Submitted by ObsessiveMathsFreak
ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) writes "Ireland's own SOPA Act has finally struck home. Today, the Irish High Court ordered all ISPs to begin censoring the The Pirate Bay. After earlier attempts were struck down, this case was brought by EMI, Sony, Warner Music and Universal music under new copyright laws brought in last year. This follows the largest ISP Eircom already having voluntarily blocked the Pirate Bay after previous legal action. Despite some early indications that some ISPs would appeal the decision, it now appears that like Eircom, they have quietly given up. Pity; IT was one of the few industires Ireland was getting right."

+ - 103 Keeping Your Data Private from the NSA (and Everyone Else)->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "If those newspaper reports are accurate, the NSA’s surveillance programs are enormous and sophisticated, and rely on the latest in analytics software. In the face of that, is there any way to keep your communications truly private? Or should you resign yourself to saying or typing, “Hi, NSA!” every time you make a phone call or send an email? Fortunately, as this article outlines, there are ways to gain a measure of security: HTTPS, Tor, SCP, SFTP, and the vendors who build software on top of those protocols. But those host-proof solutions offer security in exchange for some measure of inconvenience. If you lose your access credentials, you’re likely toast: few highly secure services include a “Forgot Your Password?” link, which can be easily engineered to reset a password and username without the account owner’s knowledge. And while "big" providers like Google provide some degree of encryption, they may give up user data in response to a court order. Also, all the privacy software in the world also can't prevent the NSA (or other entities) from capturing metadata and other information. What do you think is the best way to keep your data locked down? Or do you think it's all a lost cause?"
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+ - 117 Live hot-code reloading with Chromium browser on Linux->

Submitted by opensas
opensas (2538152) writes "Google Chrome Workspaces alows you to edit you javascript and css files right from your browser, and having them automatically updated on your file system and viceversa.

Unfortunately, getting it to work on Chromium browsers on Linux is not as easy as it should.

Here's a detailed step-by-step tutorial to start playing with this marvellous tools on your favourite operating system."

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+ - 163 Clip-Air project envisages modular aircraft you can board at a railway station->

Submitted by cylonlover
cylonlover (1921924) writes "Air travel today is a nightmare of long drives to crowded airports, long queues that move at a snail's pace, and long, boring waits in identical lobbies drinking overpriced coffee. It would be so much easier and less frustrating if catching a plane were like catching a train. If Switzerland’s École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) has its way, its Clip-Air project will one day produce modular aircraft that will allow you to board a plane at a London railway station and disembark in the middle of Rome without ever setting foot in an air terminal."
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+ - 124 IBM to bring KVM to future PowerLinux boxes 1

Submitted by Funk_dat69
Funk_dat69 (215898) writes "IBM Executive Arvind Krisha announced today during his Red Hat Summit keynote that IBM is bringing KVM to it's Power Systems next year, specifically to their Linux-only PowerLinux servers. No further details were mentioned, but adding this announcement to the effort to get OpenJDK ported to PPC64 gives a glimpse into IBM's plans for the future of their platform."

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