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Operating Systems

+ - 189 Ask Slashdot: Buying a Laptop that Doesn't Have Windows 8 8

Submitted by Sagan's Pie
Sagan's Pie (1944932) writes "I'm starting to look for a laptop for college, and the only thing I seem to find are laptops or tablets that have Windows 8. I have used Windows 7 for a long time now, and would not have a problem giving it up, but not for Windows 8. After visiting many major online retail sites, I've found that finding either a Windows 7 laptop, or even a laptop without an operating system is nearly impossible. So where should I go if looking for laptops sans os, or at the very least sans Windows 8?"
Python

+ - 172 Python Gets a Big Data Boost from DARPA->

Submitted by
itwbennett
itwbennett writes "According to an ITworld report, 'DARPA (the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) has awarded $3 million to software provider Continuum Analytics to help fund the development of Python's data processing and visualization capabilities for big data jobs. The money will go toward developing new techniques for data analysis and for visually portraying large, multi-dimensional data sets.'"
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Security

+ - 191 Trojan Takes Extended 'Naps' To Avoid Detection->

Submitted by
chicksdaddy
chicksdaddy writes "Even the bleakest circumstances look a bit brighter after a good nap — a fact that isn’t lost on malware authors, according to researchers at the firm FireEye, which have identified a new Trojan Horse program that uses extended sleep cycles to fool behavior based malware detection technology.

In a blog post Tuesday, researchers Abhishek Singh and Ali Islam said the new malware, dubbed Trojan Nap, has a function, dubbed SleepEx() that can be used to configure long “naps” that the malware takes after it is installed on a compromised system. The default value, 600,000 milliseconds – or 10 minutes – seems designed to fool automated analysis systems that are programmed to capture a sample of behavior for a set time frame. “By executing a sleep call with a long timeout, Nap can prevent an automated analysis system from capturing its malicious behavior,” FireEye said."

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Science

+ - 152 Is the Era of Groundbreaking Science Over?->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "In decades and centuries past, scientific genius was easy to quantify. Those scientists who were able to throw off the yoke of established knowledge and break new ground on their own are revered and respected. But as humanity, as a species, has gotten better at science, and the basics of most fields have been refined over and over, it's become much harder for any one scientist to make a mark on the field. There's still plenty we don't know, but so much of it is highly specialized that many breakthroughs are understood by only a handful. Even now, the latest generation is more likely to be familiar with the great popularizers of science, like Neil deGrasse Tyson, Bill Nye, and Carl Sagan, than of the researchers at the forefront of any particular field. "...most scientific fields aren’t in the type of crisis that would enable paradigm shifts, according to Thomas Kuhn’s classic view of scientific revolutions. Simonton argues that instead of finding big new ideas, scientists currently work on the details in increasingly specialized and precise ways." Will we ever again see a scientist get recognition like Einstein did?"
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Security

+ - 196 Semi-Automatic hacking of Masked ROM code from Microscopic images->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Decapping chips and recovering code or data is nothing new, but the old problem of recovering Masked ROM through visual inspection (binary '0' and '1' can be distinguished within the images) is normally done by crowd sourcing a manual typing effort. Now a tool that semi-automates this process and then recovers the data automatically has been released. This blog tells the tale."
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Patents

+ - 154 U.S. inventiveness at highest point since Industrial Revolution-> 2

Submitted by dcblogs
dcblogs (1096431) writes "U.S tech companies lead all other industries in patent production, and Silicon Valley has the highest patent-producing population, according to a new study by the Brookings Institution. The rate of patenting by U.S. inventors "is at its highest point since the Industrial Revolution." The leading year for patent production was 1916, when 410 patents were awarded for every one million people. Other big inventive years are, in order, 1915, 1885, 1932, but next on the Brooking's list is 2010 and 2011. In 2011, there were about 387 patents awarded per million people. The Brookings report argues that, based on R&D spending, the patenting rate reflects a real increase in the number of valuable inventions and not the actions of companies simply to trying to patent more things. When patent activity is measured on a per capita basis globally, the U.S. ranks ninth behind Sweden, Finland, Switzerland, Israel, the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, and Japan."
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Microsoft

+ - 181 Microsoft may be seeking protection from Linux with Dell loan ->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "Microsoft's $2 billion loan to Dell is a sign that the software maker wants to influence hardware designs in a post-PC world while protecting itself from the growing influence of Linux-based operating systems in mobile devices and servers, according to analysts. Michael Dell and equity firm Silver Lake on Tuesday announced a buyout of computer maker Dell in a deal valued at about $24.4 billion. The transaction includes the loan from Microsoft, which in a statement said it views the deal as a commitment to the "long term success of the entire PC ecosystem." As the world's third-largest PC maker, Dell is important to the success of Microsoft's server and PC software. Even though Microsoft's loan does not represent a big part of the total value of the transaction, the software maker does not throw around money lightly and its participation in the deal might be an attempt by the software maker to influence hardware designs in the post-PC world of touch laptops, tablets and smartphones, analysts said. It may also be an attempt to secure the partnership and to stop the PC maker from looking toward alternative operating systems like Linux, analysts said. Dell offers Linux servers and in late November introduced a thin and light XPS 13 laptop with a Linux-based Ubuntu OS, also code-named Project Sputnik. Major PC makers in recent months have also introduced laptops with Chrome OS."
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Medicine

+ - 139 New anatomical structure discovered and described in human spine ->

Submitted by mkortsha
mkortsha (2774091) writes "Researchers at The University of California, San Francisco have discovered a new anatomical feature of the human spine. Using micro-CT imaging technology the scientists were able to clearly image the presence of a secondary endplate layer in some spinal specimens. The double layer appears to provide additional support to the spinal endplate, which may help protect the vertebral body in case of endplate damage."
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+ - 178 Bill proposed in Oregon State Senate to ban "drones" puts R/C flying in jeopardy-> 2

Submitted by
TVmisGuided
TVmisGuided writes "A bill introduced into the Oregon State Senate by Floyd Prozanski (D-4th) would ban private ownership or operation of "drones" in that state. The trouble, as pointed out by the Roswell Flight Test Crew, is that the bill's definition of "drone" is so broad and vague that it actually could ban all radio-controlled flying in that state. Even OWNING "an unmanned flying machine that is capable of [among other things] capturing images of objects or people on the ground” would be a Class B misdemeanor, on a par with stealing $50 in merchandise or possessing a switchblade. Actually flying one bumps it up to a Class A misdemeanor, equivalent to drunk driving or unlicensed carriage of a concealed firearm. Text of the bill here (in PDF)."
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+ - 171 Amazon to mint virtual coins that can be spent only Kindle apps->

Submitted by tsamsoniw
tsamsoniw (1731366) writes "Amazon has announced that later this year, it will start offering Amazon Coins, a form of digital currency customers can use to buy apps, games, or in-app content for the Kindle — but not, say, music or videos or subscriptions or anything else for the device. The company said it will dole out millions of Amazon Coins to customers when the program goes live, so developers should get their apps submitted and approved by April 25th. Each coin is worth one cent, and developers will still get the same 70 percent cut they would per sale as they would if a customer used standard currency. Or to paraphrase an old episode of "The Simpsons, "It's money made just for Kindle apps, and it works like regular money, but it's, er, fun.""
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Android

+ - 182 OUYA Android Game Console Available In June->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The WSJ reports that OUYA, the $100 Android-based gaming console, will reach retail availability in June. The makers have partnered with Amazon, Best Buy, GameStop, and Target for distributing the devices. The console will come with a controller (which has the traditional thumbsticks, D-pad, buttons, and triggers as well as a built-in touchpad), and additional controllers will be sold for $50. OUYA CDEo Julie Uhrman said, 'For the last year or two years all we’ve been hearing is that the consoles are dead. The reason is there isn’t new, innovative intellectual property. It’s expensive to develop on it. You’re seeing a major shift of games being developed on the television. Our viewpoint has always been that console gaming isn’t dead, the way we think about it hasn’t changed. We’re bringing the best screen and the best device to interact with that by creating a platform that is open.' There was a recent 'Game Jam' to create game prototypes for the console; you can browse the 166 entries."
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Your Rights Online

+ - 175 Software that flagged HBO.com for piracy will power U.S. "Six Strikes" system->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A copyright monitoring program called MarkMonitor mistakenly flagged HBO.com for pirating its own shows, and sent automatic DMCA takedown notices to the network. It's a funny story, until you realize that MarkMonitor is the same software that will power the U.S. Copyright Alerts System (a.k.a. "Six Strikes"), due to be rolled out by the five largest U.S. ISPs sometime in the next month."
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Google

+ - 190 Google Redesigns Image Search - Raises Copyright and SEO Concerns->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Google has recently announced changes to its image search. The search provides larger views of the images with direct links to the full-sized source image. Although this new layout is being praised by some for its beauty and intuitiveness, it has raised concerns amongst image copyright holders and webmasters. Large images can now easily be seen and downloaded directly from the Google image search results without sending visitors to the hosting website. Webmasters have expressed concerns about a decrease in traffic and an increase in bandwidth usage since this change was rolled out. Some have set up a petition requesting Google remove the direct links to the images."
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Open Source

+ - 177 Tim O'Reilly steps into the comments to debate Open Government and Linux ->

Submitted by
PatrickRIot
PatrickRIot writes "Aeon Magazine ran this longform crtique of Open Source politics last week.
"Open Sesame: ‘Openness’ is the new magic word in politics – but should governments really be run like Wikipedia?"

It referenced Tim O'Reilly and the man himself has stepped in at the bottom of the page for a detailed and lengthy rejoinder.

'I'm a bit surprised to learn that my ideas of "government as a platform" are descended from Eric Raymond's ideas about Linux, since: a) Eric is a noted libertarian with disdain for government b) Eric's focus on Linux was on its software development methodology. From the start, I was the open source activist focused on the power of platforms, arguing the role for the architecture of Unix and the Internet in powering the open source movement. (continues)'"

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Open Source

+ - 159 open-source forensic surveillance analysis software of pre-recorded video 1

Submitted by McBooCZech
McBooCZech (1409351) writes "I am trying to set up a surveillance system.
It is NOT intended to build a real-time on-line surveillance system to watch a wall of monitors on a 24/7 basis.

The main scope is to record video (24/7) from the fixed cameras around our facility and when needed, get back to pre-recorded video and check it for particular event(s).

Of course it is possible to use a human power and go fast forward through video using a DVR-type FF function for short video sequences. Unfortunately for long sequences (one week) it is not acceptable solution.

I was googling the whole weekend for the open source software for analysis of pre-recorded video in order to retrieve events and data from
recorded video but no luck.

Because of that I would like ask you, slashdotters. Can you, please, provide some tips or links to the forensic software to analyse/find specific events in pre-recorded video?

Some examples of events: "human entering restricted zone" "movement in the restricted zone" "light in the restricted zone""
Microsoft

+ - 169 Dell Going Private in $24.4 Billion Agreement->

Submitted by
Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster writes "Dell is going private again, as the result of a $24.4 billion deal involving private-equity investors and Microsoft. The deal will close before the end of the second quarter of Dell’s fiscal 2014, according to Reuters. Dell founder and namesake Michael Dell, who owns roughly 14 percent of the company’s common shares, will continue to lead the newly privatized venture as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. He will contribute his existing shares to the new company, on top of a “substantial” additional cash investment. As with other hardware manufacturers in the space, Dell faces the specter of a softening PC market. And while Dell has made significant efforts to penetrate other markets—including the launch of a private cloud architecture based on the open-source OpenStack—that weakness has affected its bottom line: for its fiscal 2013 third quarter, the company reported an 11 percent decrease in revenue from the previous year; while it enjoyed an increase in revenue from its servers and services businesses, revenue from its Consumer division dipped 23 percent. Its Large Enterprise, Small and Medium Business, and Public revenue also declined."
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+ - 340 Kaspersky definition update breaks Internet access on Windows XP workstations->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Yesterday afternoon, Kaspersky Labs released a definition update that blocked all Internet and Intranet access on Windows XP workstations.

While there has been no official communication from Kaspersky, their forum is lit up with angry customers relying on each other to find a fix."

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AMD

+ - 234 AMD Publishes Open-Source Radeon HD 8000 Series Driver->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The hardware hasn't been released yet, but AMD has made available early open-source Linux GPU driver patches for supporting the future Radeon HD 8000 series graphics cards. At this time the Radeon HD 8800 "Oland" series is supported with the Mesa, DRM, X.Org, and kernel modifications. From the driver perspective, not many modifications are needed to build upon the Radeon HD 7000 series support."
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Math

+ - 151 New largest known prime number found: 2^57,885,161-1-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "ORLANDO, Florida — On January 25th at 23:30:26 UTC, the largest known prime number, 257,885,161-1, was discovered on Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS) volunteer Curtis Cooper's computer. The new prime number, 2 multiplied by itself 57,885,161 times, less one, has 17,425,170 digits. With 360,000 CPUs peaking at 150 trillion calculations per second, 17th-year GIMPS is the longest continuously-running global "grassroots supercomputing"[1] project in Internet history."
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+ - 154 Someone Just Leaked Obama's Rules for Assassinating American Citizens->

Submitted by
cathyreisenwitz
cathyreisenwitz writes "For over a year now journalists, civil liberties advocates, and members of Congress have been asking the Obama administration to release internal memoranda from the Office of Legal Counsel justifying Obama's targeted killing program.

While the White House continues to deny that such memos exist, NBC is reporting that it has acquired the next best thing: A secretish 16-page white paper from the Department of Justice that was provided to select members of the Senate last June."

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Australia

+ - 140 Australian Telco's Plan to Shape BitTorrent Traffic Won't Work->

Submitted by oztechmuse
oztechmuse (2323576) writes "Australian Telco Telstra is planning to trial shaping some BitTorrent traffic during peak hours. Like all other telcos worldwide, they are facing increasing traffic with a long tail of users: 20% of users consume 80% of bandwidth. The problem is, telcos in Australia are already shaping BitTorrent traffic as a study by Measurement Lab has shown and traffic use continues to increase. Also, the 20% of broadband users consuming the most content will just find a different way of accessing the content and so overall traffic is unlikely to be reduced."
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Privacy

+ - 236 HR Departments Tell Equifax Your Entire Salary History->

Submitted by chiguy
chiguy (522222) writes "From NBC News:
"The Equifax credit reporting agency, with the aid of thousands of human resource departments around the country, has assembled...[a database]...containing 190 million employment and salary records covering more than one-third of U.S. adults...[Equifax] says [it] is adding 12 million records annually."

This salary information is for sale: "Its database is so detailed that it contains week-by-week paystub information dating back years for many individuals, as well as ... health care provider, whether someone has dental insurance and if they’ve ever filed an unemployment claim.""

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Microsoft

+ - 214 Life after MS-DOS: FreeDOS keeps on kicking->

Submitted by
angry tapir
angry tapir writes "FreeDOS — the drop-in, open source replacement for MS-DOS — was started after Microsoft announced that starting from Windows 95, DOS would play a background role at best for users. Almost two decades later, FreeDOS has survived and, as its creator explains in this interview, is still being actively developed, despite achieving its initial aim of an MS-DOS compatible OS, which quite frankly is somewhat amazing."
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The IBM purchase of ROLM gives new meaning to the term "twisted pair". -- Howard Anderson, "Yankee Group"

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